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McDonald’s Restaurants in Australia Will Spray Synthetic DNA on Robbers

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posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 04:31 AM
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I used to work for a business man in Preston, Lancashire, who'd bought the rights to Smartwater International.

He employed a sales director (who was one of the thickest people in the entire world) to manage a team of self employed salesmen, and myself as PA to the director, and the object was to sell it's use to big businesses. It's purpose was to act as a deterrent (like a burglar alarm), and where a break-in took place, to enable the culprit to be identified by unique composition of the chemical make-up that was sprayed on them & visible under infra-red light.

I didn't stay there long.




posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 04:50 AM
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Does not certain aspects of dna (or.. well, human fluid) show up under UV light?

No need to arrest and dna test, just wave a uv light over you whilst at an RBT. The missus might object, but .. heh.

I dunno, suspected criminals could be targeted for actual dies sprayed on them as they flee, but this then can be taken to court if they were infact not in any wrong, and suddenly have an unremovable ink all over them.

I'd say this is being used as the least objective route to identifying suspects at certain stores. All the Spraying it in the food already baloney, is quite funny tho, but I'm sure the spit and indian sweat at most of the maccas I've been to would leave little room for this.

I'd say it's for the UV revealing affect, nothing more. You're not obviously a suspect to the general public so if you've done nothing wrong, mud wont stick, but at an RBT/other police check *which I disagree with in all honesty* they can test you in the process, un intrusively and quickly. Innocent people will still get caught... as with any tag and bag effort used to catch 'suspects'.

edit> OH and an easy way around this - make your own UV light detectable spray, and spray it on every one you meet. Like spraying bong water all over the place, sniffer dogs go mad and detect everyone. lmao

edit on 11-1-2012 by mainidh because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 05:00 AM
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Originally posted by baddmove
I'm still trying to figure out how people are stealing from McD's


don't you have to order and then pay AND then you get your food?


You know I had not even thought of that. Perhaps they mean the napkins and salt/pepper packets. Or the local newspaper they have stuffed in a rack.

I've never seen someone jump the counter, go fastidiously make themselves a big mac, draw a thick shake and scarper back out the door.. But if thats the case, I know where I'm going when I'm too broke to buy a feed



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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This is a nice inventive way to mark your items however, what is stopping the thief from scanning items with their own UV and removing the tag?? I would imagine any professional thief that stolen a million dollar painting would be scanning it with a UV light and if you put a DNA sticker on that expensive item, then that is just advertising it further. Then the thief would surely be scanning it.


Now the spraying DNA thing is probably more dangerous and open to lawsuits then it's worth. Thieves that hide their identity are in the mindset that they are going to get away, changing that mindset by ink packs and sprays can alter their mindset to a more deadly mindset. So you might want to ask yourself, is that cheeseburger really worth it? Furthermore, like others have mentioned what if other people got sprayed too and what you going to do when their attorney sues you? If this method is so righteous then why make it invisible in the first place?? So many what IF's.



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 06:13 AM
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Why don't people just read the links that are already posted on here? For eg...

"Does SmartWater contain DNA?

No, SmartWater is made from metal-based inert chemical compounds, making it significantly more robust that DNA. By its very nature, DNA is extremely fragile and can be easily removed using basic household cleaning products and is destroyed under short term exposure to UV light. This makes DNA unsuitable for long term property coding."

(From the Smartwater site, the link for which was put on this thread earlier).

They're comparing it to (synthetic) DNA, purely because the chemical composition of the formula supplied is unique to that purchaser, so can tie stolen items etc to the owner irrefutably. It's just artistic licence description's wording.
edit on 11-1-2012 by Toffeeapple because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 07:34 AM
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So what the hell happens when this stuff leaks? Everyone will have the "Burgler" ID stamped on them.


This is a load of BS. The things people come up with today. Lock the door and use camera's like everyone else... If ya still dont feel safe... Hire an X Con and tell him the metal bar is in the back of the room when needed.





posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 08:19 AM
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Ok? If they spray them, how do they find them? I bet there is some top secret hidden tracking device in this liquid. Reduction of crime rate hmmm...when you tag a cow does that make him stop doing whatever he already does? lol morons (mcd's)

Oh it glows under UV light, hmm I bet cops will be walking around with those or have UV light checkpoints lol. I don't know of anybody who would have the balls to spray and armed person in the first place...would attempting to spray somebody be worth your life?
edit on 11-1-2012 by Evanzsayz because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-1-2012 by Evanzsayz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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Why don't people just read the links that are already posted on here? For eg... "Does SmartWater contain DNA? No, SmartWater is made from metal-based inert chemical compounds, making it significantly more robust that DNA. By its very nature, DNA is extremely fragile and can be easily removed using basic household cleaning products and is destroyed under short term exposure to UV light. This makes DNA unsuitable for long term property coding." (From the Smartwater site, the link for which was put on this thread earlier). They're comparing it to (synthetic) DNA, purely because the chemical composition of the formula supplied is unique to that purchaser, so can tie stolen items etc to the owner irrefutably. It's just artistic licence description's wording.
reply to post by Toffeeapple
 


Damnit I hate to get harsh on you, but all you smartwater people are starting to sound like trolls.

THE SPRAY in the article IS NOT SMARTWATER....geniuses.....it IS SELECTADNA......it IS MADE by DIFFERENT COMPANY. and if any of you shining lights of ATS, who keep mentioning smart water would pull your heads out of your posterior and read the article and the this link I provided, then you would see that Selecta DNA DOES CONTAIN SYNTHETIC DNA as unique identifier. Man why are you people so stupid?.....You don't even bother reading the articles or the posts, before you post on threads or you smartwater people simply lack reading comprehension skills. Sorry to be harsh, but I am sure even after this someone will still further obfuscate this thread with more posts mentioning the irrelevant smartwater product......NOT THE SAME DAMN SPRAY.
SMARTWATER= rare earth minerals SELECTADNA= synthetic dna and yes it contains friggin synthetic DNA.

simple enough for you yet?
this link refutes your stupid smartwater nonsense



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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And really the more I research and think about what the company is doing with this spray, the more it actually bothers me.

They are basically taking the building blocks of DNA; adenine (abbreviated A), cytosine (C), guanine (G) and thymine (T), and combining them into small chains using the alternation of the nucleobases to form basically a identifiable key. Because they are basically building the DNA strands themselves from the bases and not taking DNA from living organisms, it technically is synthetic and is also; form the prospective of biology and nature, random.

And now having done some research unlike the "Smartwater" people, I am no longer just worried about allergic reactions, but I am also worried about the greater risk, that occur at a much smaller level, the bacterial level.




Some bacteria also transfer genetic material between cells. This can occur in three main ways. First, bacteria can take up exogenous DNA from their environment, in a process called transformation. Genes can also be transferred by the process of transduction, when the integration of a bacteriophage introduces foreign DNA into the chromosome. The third method of gene transfer is bacterial conjugation, where DNA is transferred through direct cell contact. This gene acquisition from other bacteria or the environment is called horizontal gene transfer and may be common under natural conditions.[118] Gene transfer is particularly important in antibiotic resistance as it allows the rapid transfer of resistance genes between different pathogens.[119]

quoted from source


Now, as you can see bacteria can absorb and transfer DNA, so how is this company absolutely sure that some bacteria is not going to come in contact with their "Synthetic" DNA strands, absorb and possibly transfer some of that random crap DNA code into itself, other bacteria and living organisms?

And the thing that worries the most, is it isn't some nefarious conspiracy of some shadowy agency, but I believe it is just simply a company trying to be cutting edge, "sexy" and garner more market share from their rival in the field; smartwater, by using "synthetic" DNA in their product, but I also don't think they are really thinking it all the way through.

And really just usining common sense; which is in short supply today, randomly seeding the environment with synthetic and random dna strands does not really sound like a smart idea.....at least not to me.

Anyway cudos to the OP for the article and bringing SELECTADNA to the attention of ATS

In before more "smartwater" trolls. XD


edit on 11-1-2012 by prisoneronashipoffools because: correcting typo

edit on 11-1-2012 by prisoneronashipoffools because: expanding

edit on 11-1-2012 by prisoneronashipoffools because: correcting typo



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by prisoneronashipoffools



Why don't people just read the links that are already posted on here? For eg... "Does SmartWater contain DNA? No, SmartWater is made from metal-based inert chemical compounds, making it significantly more robust that DNA. By its very nature, DNA is extremely fragile and can be easily removed using basic household cleaning products and is destroyed under short term exposure to UV light. This makes DNA unsuitable for long term property coding." (From the Smartwater site, the link for which was put on this thread earlier). They're comparing it to (synthetic) DNA, purely because the chemical composition of the formula supplied is unique to that purchaser, so can tie stolen items etc to the owner irrefutably. It's just artistic licence description's wording.
reply to post by Toffeeapple
 


Damnit I hate to get harsh on you, but all you smartwater people are starting to sound like trolls.

THE SPRAY in the article IS NOT SMARTWATER....geniuses.....it IS SELECTADNA......it IS MADE by DIFFERENT COMPANY. and if any of you shining lights of ATS, who keep mentioning smart water would pull your heads out of your posterior and read the article and the this link I provided, then you would see that Selecta DNA DOES CONTAIN SYNTHETIC DNA as unique identifier. Man why are you people so stupid?.....You don't even bother reading the articles or the posts, before you post on threads or you smartwater people simply lack reading comprehension skills. Sorry to be harsh, but I am sure even after this someone will still further obfuscate this thread with more posts mentioning the irrelevant smartwater product......NOT THE SAME DAMN SPRAY.
SMARTWATER= rare earth minerals SELECTADNA= synthetic dna and yes it contains friggin synthetic DNA.

simple enough for you yet?
this link refutes your stupid smartwater nonsense


Apologies, I did only notice the references to Smartwater.



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Toffeeapple
 





Apologies, I did only notice the references to Smartwater.


I would like to apologize as well, I just got a bit frustrated when I saw your post, because you were the third or so person to mention smartwater. Hopefully now though, future readers and posters will see that the SELECTADNA spray referenced in the article does indeed contain synthetic DNA. Which bothers me even more when, as you and others have pointed out there is another similar product, "Smartwater" which does not contain synthetic DNA but rare earth minerals.



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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Here in Amsterdam I have noticed a few street signs that indicate DNA spray is used in the area. I have no idea where though as these are signs on the street like normal road signs. They aren't specific to any shop or bank. I'll take a photo tomorrow and post it when I get home from work.

Just googled it to see if anyone else had photographed them and here it is



edit on 11-1-2012 by RMFX1 because: (no reason given)



A business district in Amsterdam has begun using "DNA spray," an adhesive mist triggered by store clerks, motion detectors, or by remote camera surveillance operators during a robbery or holdup. Chemical markers injected into the mist identify the precise time and location of the incident. “The procedure is simple: during a holdup a nebula of invisible liquid with a synthetic DNA code is spread in the space. the liquid attaches itself to the clothes and skin of the perpetrator and cannot simply be washed off. DNA-spray is practically invisible to the human eye, but lights up under UV-light. Suspects with traces of DNA-spray are easily traceable to the scene of the crime for the police.”


Link to article: joemygod.blogspot.com...


edit on 11-1-2012 by RMFX1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by prisoneronashipoffools
reply to post by Toffeeapple
 





Apologies, I did only notice the references to Smartwater.


I would like to apologize as well, I just got a bit frustrated when I saw your post, because you were the third or so person to mention smartwater. Hopefully now though, future readers and posters will see that the SELECTADNA spray referenced in the article does indeed contain synthetic DNA. Which bothers me even more when, as you and others have pointed out there is another similar product, "Smartwater" which does not contain synthetic DNA but rare earth minerals.



Ok, everyone is playing nice again...
Good to see.

And yes, the DNA issue is indeed troubling. I won't pretend to understand why it is used instead of the rare earth minerals. (cost?) but I do know that I see it as a precursor to more invasive technologies to keep track of us.

Many will say that I am being paranoid but look around. Did anyone living 50 yrs ago think we would be on camera wherever we go, get groped just to fly, be talking about RFID, have our purchases and online habits tracked and stored, told what we can and cannot say on our bumper stickers etc.

I'm not paranoid. It's just that when Govt. tells me one thing, I know it's another.


Peace



edit on 11-1-2012 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2012 @ 06:29 PM
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Better to be sprayed in the face then shot in the back. I wonder how this is even relevant to catching criminals when McDonalds has video cameras and police have fingerprinting/saliva swabbing it just seems like a big waste of resources.



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