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Police officer shot dead after pointing stun gun at man's dogs as he attended domestic dispute

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posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 



If an animal is going to attack me, regardless about the circumstances, I am going to kill it with everything at my disposal.

Its that simple.

Pets can be replaced. Human beings cannot be replaced.

Regardless about everyone's opinion, the dogs were only stunned and a human being was murdered.
If a police officer is going to unlawfully enter somebodys property without a warrant, and then attempt to electrocute his dogs at the request of the police chief, then he may also kill him with everything at his disposal.


Pets can be replaced. Human beings cannot be replaced.
What do you mean? You can buy a new pet, so why not have another child with that logic? People love their pets just like a family member, and this guy was obviously one of them.

What if a cop came onto your property without a warrant and pointed a tazer at your 10 month old baby? I mean, tazers only stun, right? Would you feel comfortable with a 20 lb child being tazed, even if you love it since it's your family member? What about a 20 lb dog that you consider a part of your family?


edit on 16-8-2011 by TupacShakur because: To edit my post




posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


Link: Freemansburg police officer Robert Lasso fatally shot

Freemansburg police officer Robert Allen Lasso was shot and killed on the job early Thursday evening while responding to a disturbance call in the borough.

George Hitcho Jr., who was taken into custody by police, owns the 440 New St. home that Lasso was responding to when he was shot at 5:06 p.m., police said.

George Hitcho was involved with a possible crime, and the Officer arrived due to someone making a phone call. When someone reports a domestic disturbance, the cop has all rights to investigate the situation.

edit on 8/16/2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 


George Hitcho was involved with a possible crime, and the Officer arrived due to someone making a phone call. When someone reports a domestic disturbance, the cop has all rights to investigate the situation.
Cops aren't above the law. They can't enter somebodys private property without a warrant because they have a piece of metal on their shirt, crime or no crime.

And the guy asked him to leave his property unless he had a warrant, but the cop instead came onto his property unlawfully and tried to taze his dogs. But hey, let's throw a pity party because the cop that screwed up got killed for his mistake.
edit on 16-8-2011 by TupacShakur because: To edit my post



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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Dare i say you stand alone with your ignorance.I sure hope so.
In my opinion you may gain some clarity by reading the entire thread and giving the ole constitution a good look through.

Originally posted by fooks
reply to post by deadeyedick
 


naw, he ain't alone on this.

read my posts here.

blaine is right on.

Now that response is telling.
Im saying that your being ignorant to the writing on the wall.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:32 PM
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All dogs growl and bear their teeth. But it doesn't make them dangerous. Unless you're a 120lb 5'2 female, you have pretty much nothing to fear from a dog other than a few puncture wounds or 5-6 stitches.

From the story the dogs were protecting their property while he was trying to trespass for quite some time. There are procedures to follow, and when you cut corners someones going to get hurt. I sit next to an enforcement officer, and the first things they told him were:

* Don't be afraid to back away, there's no shame in fleeing.
* There are no warning shots, you shoot to stop.

The man who shot the officer acted correctly since the officer didn't back away and continued to trespass and he didn't have a warrant. Once a warning is given that you're on private property and if you fail to leave, you're liable to be shot or arrested.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by TupacShakur
 


Morganelli would not say if Hitcho has a criminal record or past history of violence, but records show he has at least one criminal conviction.

Hmmm... Sounds like this dog owner has a criminal conviction.

How do you explain that?



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 



Hmmm... Sounds like this dog owner has a criminal conviction.

How do you explain that?
I explain it by the man committing a crime, and being convicted of it.

His criminal record does not change the fact that the cop entered his property without a warrant, and rather than leaving upon request of the homeowner, tried to shoot his dogs with a tazer.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by TupacShakur
reply to post by Section31
 



Hmmm... Sounds like this dog owner has a criminal conviction.

How do you explain that?
I explain it by the man committing a crime, and being convicted of it.

His criminal record does not change the fact that the cop entered his property without a warrant, and rather than leaving upon request of the homeowner, tried to shoot his dogs with a tazer.

According to the information we have, the officer was responding to a domestic disturbance at Mr. Hitcho's residence.

What if Mr. Hitcho was threatening someone with the gun, and that is what triggered off the phone call to the police?

Someone reported a crime had taken place at Mr. Hitch's house.

edit on 8/16/2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 



According to the information we have, the officer was responding to a domestic disturbance at Mr. Hitcho's residence.

What if Mr. Hitcho was threatening someone with the gun, and that is what triggered off the phone call to the police?

Someone reported a crime had taken place at Mr. Hitch's house.
Yes, that sounds like a situation where the police might need to assist. This does not give them the right to enter somebody's property without a warrant, and attempt to taze his dogs rather than leaving and getting a warrant.

Can the cops just enter anybodys property because of a phone call? I don't think they can, that's what warrants are for, the permission to do that.

I could be wrong though, maybe this just applies to searching somebody's property rather than responding to a crime, especially one that is in progress.

Any law experts know?



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by TupacShakur
reply to post by Section31
 


Can the cops just enter anybodys property because of a phone call? I don't think they can, that's what warrants are for, the permission to do that.

I could be wrong though, maybe this just applies to searching somebody's property rather than responding to a crime, especially one that is in progress.

You see? It was not as simple as people think.

According to what we are currently hearing, someone reported a crime in progress (domestic disturbance). Mr. Hitcho's residence was where the crime had taken place.

When an officer came out to investigate the crime in progress, he was killed by the exact homeowner who was committing the crime.

What we do not understand is - What crime did Mr. Hitcho commit? What was Mr. Hitcho hiding?

edit on 8/16/2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by Section31
 



You see? It was not as simple as people think.

According to what we are currently hearing, someone reported a crime in progress (domestic disturbance). Mr. Hitcho's residence was where the crime was being taken place.

When an officer came out to investigate the crime in progress, he was killed by the exact homeowner who was committing the crime.
I know this, but what I am trying to figure out is whether or not a cop needs a warrant to enter a persons private property regardless of the situation, of if they only need warrants to search a persons private property.


What we do not understand is - What crime did Mr. Hitcho commit? What was Mr. Hitcho hiding?
I don't think he was hiding anything, I think he was protecting his dogs because the cop was about to taze them.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by TheLieWeLive
 


You also didn't notice any comments from the police in regards to the homeowner stating that he asked the officer to leave unless he had a warrant.

Rule of law is rule of law and trumps all argument: without a warrant or suspicion of illegal activities (and disturbance is not one of them) the officer cannot traipse through someones property and attempt to kill their animals. Officer learned a few lessons I'd think:

1) Badge does not make you bulletproof
2) Without reason/warrant you can't trespass and destroy someones animals/property

Granted, the right thing to do would be to call 911 and tell the dispatcher that an officer has illegally trespassed on your property and is about to kill your animal without cause/reason, but I can see where there wouldn't be time for such, and I would rather kill the officer than have my dog murdered just because someone with a badge thinks they're the Lord of the Land.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:10 PM
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How does a citizen arrest a police officer? I am really curious. How do you get a police officer to allow themselves to be under citizens arrest? How do you successfully and peacefully disarm a police officer and arrest them with a citizens arrest? Is it even possible to do? Violence seems to be the ONLY resort that there is against tyranny. Either that or become a subject, a slave to those who want you unarmed and complacent/compliant to their command.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:21 PM
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Again, Law enforcement is out of control when it comes to respecting our Constitutional rights. We see it the most in regards to domestic dispute situations. They have way too much power to come into someone's home and violate their liberties, EVEN WHEN A CRIME HAS NOT BEEN COMMITTED.

Let me give you a simple example. My neighbor and his wife were fighting a few weeks ago. She was gonna leave with the kids to her sister's house, but my neighbor told her that she was not going anywhere because she had been drinking. He tod her that her Sister was welcome to come and pick her and the kids up if she wished.

Instead, My neighbor's wife asked her sister to call the police, so the idiot did. Which created lifelong family holiday problems, but I won't go into that. Let's be clear here, they only had an arguement, and nothing physical whatsoever happened. Well, Guess what did happen?

The two officers that showed up, immediately tried to gain access to the house. One of them first showed up, and he was the first. My neighbor was sitting on the couch, and the officer entered his residence. His wife was out front speaking with the other officer that showed up just prior to the first taking her statement, and then proceeding to enter the residence.

Anyway, The first officer entered the home, and asked my neighbor to please stand up with his hands out of his pockets. He did comply. Then, he asked him what was going on. My neighbor replied that they had had a fight, and that she wanted to leave, but that he didn't want her leaving with the kids in a vehicle while under the influence. Then, all of a sudden the other officer enters the residence, and asks his partner, any problems here? My neighbor said the 2nd officer had a cold look stare at him as he asked his partner this. The 1st officer said no, it's under control, he's good.

Then, My neighbor said that he didn't understand what all the fuss was about because he was protecting the life of his children, his wife and others by preventing her from driving under the influence. Then the 2nd cop said shut up! If we want another statement from you, we will ask you! My neighbor, who is ex-Military, an avid hunter and firearms expert told me that he wanted to shoot the cop right then. Of course he didn't, but that's the kind of rage that a jerk cop can light up in a Man in his home who has done absolutely nothing. Then the same Cop asks my neighbor a question, he said why didn't you leave then? My neighbor replied, because I have been drinking too, and I didn't want to get a DUI or hurt anyone else. Then the cop walked out of the residence without saying anything more. The 1st cop then gave my neighbor's id back to him, and said as long as there are no more calls, we won't be back.

My point is this. It only takes one asshole with power who has a chip on his shoulder to throw gas on an already lit flame. That 2nd Cop spoke with my neighbor's wife prior to entering the residence with bad intentions, and she is very attractive, and I am sure that he felt like playing the hero that night. Only for what? Nothing happened but a simple arguement between Husband and Wife.

Yeah, I have seen myself these Ray Liota (Unlawful Entry) types who are most likely twice divorced, single and hard up. I will say this, they are in the minority, and most Law Enforcement officers are good men and women. Nevertheless, this happens quite alot. My advice to Law enforcement is this. Respect a Man when you're entering his cave. If he has broken no law, atleast treat him with respect in his own home. Don't over-react so much. That's it, pretty simple right?

With all that being said, I have a very good friend who is an Oakland cop out here in California, and an Uncle who is Fish and Game. I know how difficult and dangerous their jobs can be and I considered making it a career myself. Only, I am way too aggressive to be a Police officer. This officer in this threads story died for a meaningless reason. He did not deserve to have his life taken from him. Nothing can change that fact. Not officers with a chip on their shoulders, Not Constitutional Liberties, and certainly not dog lovers. ~SheopleNation
edit on 16-8-2011 by SheopleNation because: Spelling TypO



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by Limbo
 


lol it's like they are trying to convince everybody that he's some sort of dangerous viking bersekerganger
i mean, if you just go by that google eyed mugshot
and failing
a long string of offenses
traffic tickets? drug paraphernalia what bambu papers?

has anybody noticed how small, mr hitcho is, in terms of height?


edit on 16-8-2011 by DerepentLEstranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:34 PM
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Originally posted by Section31
If an animal is going to attack me, regardless about the circumstances, I am going to kill it with everything at my disposal.


That is all well and good, but it still does not excuse being on someone else's property without their permission.



Pets can be replaced. Human beings cannot be replaced.


Rights are more important than pets or human lives, including my own.


Regardless about everyone's opinion, the dogs were only stunned and a human being was murdered.


It is not about the dogs. The dogs were the catalyst. It is about this man's rights being infringed upon.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 


It is indeed, a shame. It could have played out much different if just one actor in this case had taken a different approach



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by AnimositisominA
 


I agree that the officer should have went to the FRONT door...especially if the back yard was fenced.He had
no business being there...without a warrant and if he had that probably all sides of house should have been
covered..IF the backyard was fenced ....the dogs should have been there do to the recent heat from the
neighbor.The cop should have went to the front...door...Given the officers neg. past with the shooter...
perhaps the cop was even looking for a problem by going in through the backyard...
I have some c j background and I believe there are some real serious prosecution problems here...despite
the low character reports of the shooter...More likely to get convictions on,' in house' violations if all that
isnt thrown out (fruit of forbidden tree)
Police nation wide to be reminded ...there are people that are very attached to their animals ...and wanton
killing is not going to be tolerated...every effort should be made to not harm life.Not happy about this
officers death...but he did not do everything he could have to avoid that...
Just because you can shoot something ....doesnt mean you should....in retro...even a few dog bites leaving
the backyard to go to front to appease the owner....looks kinda better than....the way it ended ...right??
I mean his wife and kids would have preferred he come home even with a few dog bites ...then not coming home??
This became a loose /loose situation ...that did not have to happen....



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by Section31

. . .
Owner's dogs were only stunned.


Which they would not have been if this man's rights had been respected.


Now the Cop's kids will have to live without a father,


Appeal to emotion. Again, please leave emotion out of the equation. Rights and most laws are black and white. Adding emotion to the mix only serves to cloud judgement.


for some homeowner couldn't exercise common sense.


The reverse could also be said. "For some police officer who couldn't exercise common sense."

Common sense tells you that one can't infringe upon another's rights, ESPECIALLY as a government agent.



posted on Aug, 16 2011 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by Section31

. . .
George Hitcho was involved with a possible crime, and the Officer arrived due to someone making a phone call. When someone reports a domestic disturbance, the cop has all rights to investigate the situation.

edit on 8/16/2011 by Section31 because: (no reason given)


You are correct that officers have to investigate the situation. It is wrong to trample on rights during the investigation, though.

Please look up exigent circumstances for acting without a warrant. After you do that, name one that applies.


edit on 8/16/2011 by Lemon.Fresh because: (no reason given)




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