Denver airport mason keypad code

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posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 01:34 PM
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first off, this topic has been beaten, stabbed, burned, shot to death. search function people!

now to my additions to this...


Originally posted by jmilici
Here is a really good site that explains all the oddities. I guarantee you will be shocked.


that site is actually crap. let me break it down for you.

EDIT: everything in quotes below is from the link provided by jmilici.


Even though the area is basically flat (with a stunning view of mountains all around, since it's in a valley), the expense and time was taken to extensively lower some areas and raise others. They moved 110 million cubic yards of earth around. This is about 1/3rd of the amount of earth they moved when they dug out the Panama Canal.


runways have to be level. one major thing is that on such large runways the curvature of the earth does take effect. this happened when detroit metro airport had a new runway built a few years ago. the engineers didn't think of it and when the survey crews came in to make sure everything was correct, they realized it wasn't. so instead of taking out tons and tons of dirt to level everything off, they just added more concrete to the runways. the runways are 2.25 inches thicker at either end than in the middle. also, runways are thick. very thick. they have to support a several hundred ton force when a plane lands and survive for the next thousands of planes.


The airport has a fiber optic communications core made of 5,300 miles of cable. That's longer than the Nile River. That's from New York City to Buenos Aires, Argentina. The airport also has 11,365 miles of copper cable communications network.


and how much of a communications system do places like the sears tower have? or other airports? hmm...



The fueling system can pump 1,000 gallons of jet fuel per minute through a 28-mile network of pipes. There are six fuel hold tanks that each hold 2.73 million gallons of jet fuel. This is somewhere in the "no one will ever ever need this much" range.


actually, that's bull#. it's in the "every airport needs that much fuel." this is especially true for an airport such as denver. a harsh winter could delay fuel supplies, and then you have stranded airplanes for however long... and even worse, stranded passengers and freight. last time i checked something like that would be very bad for business.

the pumps make sense because of the winters as well. if a pipe breaks, freezes, or malfunctions in any way, at any time, you have redundancy.
that goes back to not leaving passengers or freight stranded.

not to mention the fact that airliners use an IMMENSE amount of fuel.


Granite was imported from all over the world - Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America - and used in making the main terminal floor. This is a ridiculous expense, especially when you're already over budget. They say, "The floor pattern echoes the roof design and subtly reinforces passenger flows". Ah...subliminal messages to move your ass. It might look pretty but would any of us know Chilean granite from Chinese granite? Or care? You can dye rock if it's colors you're after. Cheaper rocks. (I wonder what the "stones have power" people say about this...)


again, how is this different from any other major airport or business center?


The huge, main terminal is Jeppesen Terminal, named after Elfrey Jeppesen, who was the first person to create maps specifically for aviation (the company is still in business today). This area is known as the "Great Hall"; it's said this is what the Masons name their meeting place.
It is 900 feet by 210 feet big. This is over 1.5 million square feet of space. All told, there is over 6 million square feet of public space at DIA. The airport brags that they have room to build another terminal and two more concourses and could serve 100 million passengers a year. The airport flew 36 million in 2001.


can anyone think of a better name for a ginormous hall other than "the great hall?" plus, that name has a sound of... well... greatness to it. i'm sure someone did suggest naming it "the hall of large proportions," but that's just cumbersome.

also, last time i checked area is equal to length times width. so 900X210 is more than 1.5 million? hmm... my brain and calculator must both be broken, since i came up with an answer of 189,000 square feet. that's NO WHERE NEAR 1.5 MILLION square feet!

another thing is that they only have the space to build more terminals and concourses. space is a very, very crucial thing to an airport. if they already have the space then they don't need to worry about buying up nearby land in order to expland the airport if they ever need to.


The only way to get to the other two concourses/terminals from the Great Hall, or vice versa, is via the airport's train system.


i've never been there, so i cannot comment on this point. but with the track record of all the other points i'm not going to believe it.


There are more than 19 miles (30 km) of conveyor belt track, luggage transport cars and road in their own underground tunnels that move baggage and goods. They're so huge you can drive trucks through them, and some remain unused.


okay, well i work for UPS. in the distribution center i work at there is over a mile of conveyors. this isn't even a hub or anything, just a distrubution center that services about 6 square miles ypsilanti/ann arbor michigan area. a major airport would have a lot more packages and baggages going through, so it would need more conveyor space.

the underground tunnels make sense too. baggage cars don't move very fast, and one or more crossing a runway or running around the tarmac has the potential to cause delays. this way you go under everything and don't have to worry about that.


The entire roof of DIA is made of 15 acres of Teflon-coated, woven fiber glass. The same material is on the inside as a layer, also. The place looks like a bizarre (but kind of cool) scene out of "Dune", comprised of huge, spiked tent-like structures. The material reflects 90% of the sunlight and doesn't conduct heat. So you can't see into the place with radar or see heat signatures. I added helpfully.


i emboldened that last statement. why? because the author basically admits to hyping all of this up, and more than likely not knowing what the hell he or she is talking about! let me see some actual proof that the roof reflects so much sunlight/heat and that it blocks radars.

sorry jmilici, i wasn't ripping into you on that, just the site. so please don't take it personally. i just cannot stand people saying that that site is a source of "good" information.

[edit on 8/18/2004 by cmdrkeenkid]




posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 01:46 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
This area is known as the "Great Hall"; it's said this is what the Masons name their meeting place.


"It is said" by whom? Joe Schmo from Kokomo?

I'll give you a hint -- this is wrong. We call our meeting places "Lodge Halls," or, if we're lazy and don't mind slight inaccuracies (as is sometimes the case), "Lodges."



posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
"It is said" by whom? Joe Schmo from Kokomo?

I'll give you a hint -- this is wrong. We call our meeting places "Lodge Halls," or, if we're lazy and don't mind slight inaccuracies (as is sometimes the case), "Lodges."


whoa, sorry! no, i didn't say that. everything except for the first quote by jmilici was from the webpage in the same quote. i'll edit my post to clear that up.



posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 02:23 PM
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I'd guess that the keypad opens the time-capsule that's apparently buried right underneath it. Nothing too sneaky there.



posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
whoa, sorry! no, i didn't say that. everything except for the first quote by jmilici was from the webpage in the same quote. i'll edit my post to clear that up.


Woah, woah, woah! Wait a minute yourself. Arrgh. Stupid quoting system. I wasn't criticising you, merely the person you were quoting. Arrrrgh! Sorry! Just for your reference, I thought your post was great.



posted on Aug, 18 2004 @ 03:48 PM
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No offense taken cmdrkeenkid. We are here to deny ignorance. I am not perfect, so sometimes I miss things.

I will say that I have been there and everything about the roof EXCEPT the radar issue I can confirm.

As far as getting from one termianl to the other, the only way for the public is through the tram system. I am sure there are other ways for the employees & officials.

The things that shocked me about the whole thing are the murals. I flew into DIA in the summer of 2000, and noticed the murals then. I found that site last year somtime. Me and my wife to be spent about an hour looking at them and was appaled at what was depicted in these murals. A nother thing that shocked me was the runway layout. Like the site says, kinda looks like a swatstika. I have tried to research and find actual pics or satelite photo's of the runway's but to no avail. Oh well.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by jmilici
The fueling system can pump 1,000 gallons of jet fuel per minute through a 28-mile network of pipes. There are six fuel hold tanks that each hold 2.73 million gallons of jet fuel. This is somewhere in the "no one will ever ever need this much" range.



Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
actually, that's bull#. it's in the "every airport needs that much fuel." this is especially true for an airport such as denver. a harsh winter could delay fuel supplies, and then you have stranded airplanes for however long... and even worse, stranded passengers and freight. last time i checked something like that would be very bad for business.

...

not to mention the fact that airliners use an IMMENSE amount of fuel.


OK, here's some quick math:

DFW press releases say they handle nearly 2,000 flights per day.

A Boeing 737 can hold 6,875 gallons of fuel.

A Boeing 757 can hold 11,466 gallons of fuel.

So, let's generalize it and say a plane uses 9,170 gallons.

The site mentioned says they have a total of 16,380,000 gallons of fuel at DFW, and that "no one will ever ever need this much".

Well, 2,000 planes, using 9,170 gallons each = 18,340,000 gallons. So in reality, it looks like there's not enough fuel for them to make it through 1 day!*

* In reality, not all planes will fully fuel up for each flight, and there's many other considerations, but it doesn't look like there's anything out of the ordinary with their fuel capacity.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 02:10 PM
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Originally posted by media_assassin

Originally posted by jmilici
The fueling system can pump 1,000 gallons of jet fuel per minute through a 28-mile network of pipes. There are six fuel hold tanks that each hold 2.73 million gallons of jet fuel. This is somewhere in the "no one will ever ever need this much" range.



Originally posted by cmdrkeenkid
actually, that's bull#. it's in the "every airport needs that much fuel." this is especially true for an airport such as denver. a harsh winter could delay fuel supplies, and then you have stranded airplanes for however long... and even worse, stranded passengers and freight. last time i checked something like that would be very bad for business.

...

not to mention the fact that airliners use an IMMENSE amount of fuel.


OK, here's some quick math:

DFW press releases say they handle nearly 2,000 flights per day.

A Boeing 737 can hold 6,875 gallons of fuel.

A Boeing 757 can hold 11,466 gallons of fuel.

So, let's generalize it and say a plane uses 9,170 gallons.

The site mentioned says they have a total of 16,380,000 gallons of fuel at DFW, and that "no one will ever ever need this much".

Well, 2,000 planes, using 9,170 gallons each = 18,340,000 gallons. So in reality, it looks like there's not enough fuel for them to make it through 1 day!*

* In reality, not all planes will fully fuel up for each flight, and there's many other considerations, but it doesn't look like there's anything out of the ordinary with their fuel capacity.


Nice work!


It is a very interesting building complex. I'm sure it will make for good reading, if nothing else.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by media_assassin
DFW press releases say they handle nearly 2,000 flights per day.


Wrong state, but nice attempt.

Try 1,398 flights a day for 2003, for a total of 12,819,660 gallons by your methods.

It still seems reasonable to have that much on-site, though.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:01 PM
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Hey, does anyone else think that an overhead view of DIA looks sort of like a Swastika?

DIA From Overhead



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:09 PM
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Originally posted by Loki
Hey, does anyone else think that an overhead view of DIA looks sort of like a Swastika?


Yes, the author of the article mentioned above does


And speaking of runways, runway 16R-34L is the longest commercially certified runway in the U.S. Since it's the only one that large, whatever needs that much room to take off / land can only do it there.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:11 PM
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Ah, Actually, I think that they may have built that runway so that DIA could serve as an emergency landing point for the Space shuttle.

Not 100% sure on that, but I'm thinking that's why it's so long.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:12 PM
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Originally posted by Midnight Watchman

Originally posted by media_assassin
DFW press releases say they handle nearly 2,000 flights per day.


Wrong state, but nice attempt.



Heheh oops, didn't catch that...

Yeah it kind of has the look of a swastika, but I think it is a practicality thing as opposed to a symbolism thing. I mean think about it. You have an airport sitting on top of a mountain range. Set aside the fact that you can have more than one plane inbound at one time, it gives (almost) every option for the ATC and the pilots to get a plane down safely in high wind or other weather conditions. If you can come in from 4 directions you have a better chance and the pilot doesn't have to circle waiting for the wind to cooperate. What do I know about it? Nothing, but it makes sense to me.

If I'm wrong, it wouldn't be the first time, nor likely to be the last.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by Midnight Watchman
And speaking of runways, runway 16R-34L is the longest commercially certified runway in the U.S. Since it's the only one that large, whatever needs that much room to take off / land can only do it there.


No it's not, the runway at Albuquerque International Airport is 1,375 feet longer.

The reason these airports have long runways is because of the elevation, and heat index (in Albuquerque's case) that decrease lift at takeoff.

ABQ

DIA

Please also note that Albuquerque's airport, which sits at the bottom of a valley, is higher in elevation than Denver's which sits atop a plateau.

Concession that the above is incorrect, damn the failure to udate data bases.


[edit on 20/8/2004 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:34 PM
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I don't know if DIA is the only one that's not this way, but it seems to me most airports have parallel runways. MM (or anyone else) do you have any ideas on why DIA is laid out in such a way?



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me
No it's not, the runway at Albuquerque International Airport is 1,375 feet longer.


You didn't do your homework - DEN 16R/34L is the longest in North America at 16,000 feet. There's some info here.

(ABQ's is only 13,375, so DEN beats it by 2,625 feet). This is why you should always double-check facts, especially on the internet.

Multiple sources keep you you from allowing ignorance.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 03:49 PM
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it does look like a swastika but if you think about it in terms of construction such runways in such a fashion would make things alot easier for the planes to land when they need to. instead of circling the sky waiting for another plane to land. just as posted above this one.

but one thing that does make me think is the twin towers that are on those murals, these murals were painted in the 90's ive heard? wierd stuff.

why would they have nazis in the murals, i mean yes america is still a british country in some ways but putting nazis on there is just rediculous.

and about that mason stoned keypbad thingamabobber. reminds me of when i read about the masons having control of our banking systems, but airports as well? who knows maybe were all just looking into this too much. but underground tunnels does make alot of sense. since ive heard of things like this in the past. but i wont get into that.



posted on Aug, 19 2004 @ 04:51 PM
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there is no keypad here. it is a stone cap over the "time capsule",
with a metal and stone arm extending above it, ending in a podium looking thing, on which is an off center wooden block. i understand that less than i would a keypad. the mural however, is several sections and tells the progression of the world from armed tyrrany(darth vader and the destroyed city scape) to global unity as seen in the mural with all the children of the world handing their weapons to the german boy with the iron fist. other sections show include four women of different races in coffins. i have heard many different analyses of the mural, but most fail to account for everything, except for the artists statement. makes sense.
the statement can be found somewhere, but i am to busy to find it right now. i really dont get the podium with the wood block though. in reicheian energy theory metal reflects orgonic energy while wood and other organics absorb it. maybe a place for executive serpent illuminati to stop and charge their pineals so that they dont accidentaly shape shift on the way from dallas to new york.lol



posted on Aug, 20 2004 @ 11:17 AM
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I will tell you about the runway. If it is the one that was built withen the last 2 years.

I was out of work from my normal job so to pick up some work I did temporary labor through labor ready. The assignment they put me on was unloading loose cement from trains. The company I did this for was/is called Holcim. I do not know anything about them. Well they built a seperate unloading dock just to handle the unloading. This was what I was told. A runway that is approx 20,000 feet long by 100 yards wide by I believe 3-5 feet deep was being built to handle the growing international flights. That what was told to me.

I only did this assignment for three days. Basically we unloaded the loose cement from the train directly to the truck(18 wheeler). We got approx 8 to 10 trucks per train car. In a typical 8 hr day we unloaded about 10 to 12 train cars. They typically did 12 to 14 hour days. I only work 8 hrs for legal reasons. So they probably unloaded around 20 cars a day 7 days a week. This project lasted for 9 months I was only there for 3 days(hardest work I ever done in my life). That's 9 months of unloading cement for a runway.

The more & more I have thought about it the more & more fishy things seem with the whole thing. Then again, I just might be pulling conspiracies out of my a$$. Never actually done the math on this.



posted on Aug, 20 2004 @ 11:34 AM
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from the figures i,ve run, you guys didn't unload enough concrete.





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