Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Teenager Student the 'Major player' in LulzSec Global Hacking Plot

page: 1
6
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join

posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 01:54 AM
link   

Teenager Student the 'Major player' in LulzSec Global Hacking Plot


theage.com.au

A British teenager suspected of masterminding a global computer hacking plot from his bedroom could face a fight against extradition to the US.

Ryan Cleary was arrested at his detached family home in Essex on Tuesday as part of a Scotland Yard and FBI probe into LulzSec, a group claiming responsibility for hacking attempts on the UK's Serious Organised Crime Agency, the US Senate and the CIA.

(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.telegraph.co.uk
news.ninemsn.com.au
www.guardian.co.uk

edit on 22-6-2011 by Havick007 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 01:54 AM
link   
I guess it was only a matter of time before they tracked someone down in relation to the recent hacking issues. Although many outlets are reporting the Ryan Cleary was the mastermind behind LulzSec.
I doubt it and just because they got one person, i am sure there are many other 'members' of that group just a capable as he was.





UK 'hack' teenager could face US court



Neighbours who witnessed the dawn police swoop spoke of their shock as the "very bright" 19-year-old university student was questioned.

Detectives believe Cleary was a "major player" with LulzSec, which has also claimed security breaches at games firms Nintendo and Sony.

As American authorities were kept closely informed over the "pre-planned intelligence-led operation", lawyers said US prosecutors may demand he faces justice across the Atlantic.

NineMSN






Did anyone catch this strange clip on youtube about what was happening between Anon and LulzSec?



The pictures are kinda creepy if you ask me....


edit on 22-6-2011 by Havick007 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 01:55 AM
link   
He is a British citizen, meaning he cannot be tried in the US court of law. Sucks for US authorities I guess. How did he get caught anyway, and why did he not use free public wireless to perform his attacks boggles my mind.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
He is a British citizen, meaning he cannot be tried in the US court of law. Sucks for US authorities I guess. How did he get caught anyway, and why did he not use free public wireless to perform his attacks boggles my mind.


I would imagine this being a sting operation. also to draw out sympathizers and terminate, or perhaps incite further.
they need a scapegoat to legitimize their cause, so why not create one?

and don't worry, they will extradite him



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:06 AM
link   

Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
He is a British citizen, meaning he cannot be tried in the US court of law. Sucks for US authorities I guess. How did he get caught anyway, and why did he not use free public wireless to perform his attacks boggles my mind.


I would say hacking is illegal in England too, so he won't really escape the law. Why didn't he use free public wireless? Wouldn't he be more susceptible to being caught, I would think that England monitors its free wifi for illegal activities.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:07 AM
link   
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Really? I didnt realise that, it seems kind of strange considering the so-called 'special relationship' both countries have.
I'm sure if they really want him they will get him and if they cant extradite him, i would say there is a good chance he will recieve jail time in the UK.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:13 AM
link   

Originally posted by Havick007
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Really? I didnt realise that, it seems kind of strange considering the so-called 'special relationship' both countries have.
I'm sure if they really want him they will get him and if they cant extradite him, i would say there is a good chance he will recieve jail time in the UK.


I need not look further then the case of Marc Emery to see how this could play out if the Americans truly desire to charge him on their jurisdiction.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:17 AM
link   

Originally posted by THE_PROFESSIONAL
He is a British citizen, meaning he cannot be tried in the US court of law. Sucks for US authorities I guess. How did he get caught anyway, and why did he not use free public wireless to perform his attacks boggles my mind.


He'll be extradited to the US, same as Gary McKinnon (well, he's still holding on by a thread).

I doubt very much that he's the main man (boy) behind this. Scape goat.

"It's OK world, we have the person that caused all this!"

Jeeez, he's the geek version of Bin Laden!



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:32 AM
link   
According to the LulzSec twitter feed, he is not part of LulzSec:


LulzSec The Lulz Boat
Ryan Cleary is not part of LulzSec; we house one of our many legitimate chatrooms on his IRC server, but that's it. [youtube link included above]
12 hours ago


Of course I would expect LulzSec to say that, even if he were part of their organisation. But I find it odd that only one arrest was made. Perhaps the members of the group are isolated enough that the authorities could find one member but no others - but the whole thing does seem a bit strange.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:34 AM
link   
reply to post by TheStev
 


Well if that is indeed true then he got shafted big time.... although they may be saying that to try and help him and move blame away from him.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:42 AM
link   
reply to post by iamaperson
 




Wouldn't he be more susceptible to being caught, I would think that England monitors its free wifi for illegal activities


Sure it can be monitored, but if your traffic is encrypted and your doing it out of your car in a busy intersection, they wont be able to trace you. Encryption + public wifi = anonymous.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:47 AM
link   
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


But it all depends on who is trying to trace your connection and whether or not they have the capability of breaking the encryption.

Although it's not an easy task for the average person or even a hacker, there are government agencies (NSA) and even private companies that have the capability. What if a federal agency went to the phone carrier and asked for the details of the person connected at the time and approx place, as long as they had the right type of warrant it could be done, especially with all the new privacy/security laws passed in the past few years.

Although it's public Wifi, there is always some type of link or trace that you were there, all they would need is an IMEI or Simcard number register.

edit on 22-6-2011 by Havick007 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:48 AM
link   
reply to post by Havick007
 


Even the NSA cannot break 8192 bit RSA encryption or AES-256. You sit out with your laptop from a wireless access point far away. Heck even use an old satellite dish to sit hundreds of yards away and increase the range. Laptops have no simcard dude. Your connection is untraceable. Just change the MAC address. Untraceable. I just picked up an old satellite dish that enables me 1/2 mile range on my wifi card. Meaning I could be sitting in a car half a mile away and using public wifi with encryption. How can anyone be traced?

This baby will increase your wifi range 4 miles:
www.radiolabs.com...
edit on 22-6-2011 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:53 AM
link   
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Yeah but we are talking about WEP or WPA2, with WPA2 being more recent and more secure but they would still be breakable with the right know-how.

Well thats my opinion, i may be wrong.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:55 AM
link   
reply to post by Havick007
 


No no no. I am talking about using free public no WPA2 or WEP networks. Networks that allow you to get on as public access. WPA2 does not mean your internet traffic is encrypted. It only means your connection to the router is encrypted by a password. Once you connect to a router, anyone who is in charge of that router can read your internet traffic unless you use software on your laptop to encrypt your internet traffic.

Once again, WPA2/WEP does not mean your internet traffic is encrypted. It just means no one can get on to your router without a password unless they crack it. I am advocating the use of unsecured free public wifi, and then encrypt the traffic on your end so that their can be no one snooping on you.
edit on 22-6-2011 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 02:57 AM
link   
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 


Sorry when i said simcard i was thinking about Wireless Broadband etc from your carrier, yeah not the same i know.

Think about this from a common sense point of view and from that of a government agency. Would they create Wifi and public hotspots etc knowing that it would be totally impossible to trace activity. Hackers would have a field day along with other types of cyber criminal.

It just seems logical to assume there is always a way you can be traced.

Although using a completly clean laptop on public Wifi with no trace to your name.... maybe your right.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 03:00 AM
link   
reply to post by Havick007
 


Buy a netbook from the mall in 200 bux cash, change the MAC address. Buy a long range antenna. Encrypt the traffic at your end and use a free public wifi. The anonymous/lulz hackers dont do this because they are too young to drive or leave their moms basement.



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 03:03 AM
link   
reply to post by THE_PROFESSIONAL
 

the usa has a one sided extradition treaty with the uk , they can apply for extradition of a british subject with little or no evidence of crime .
as i understood that some one could not be extradited to a country where they would receive a more harsher penalty than they would in their own country as in the case of gary mckinnon , this caused a lot of bad feelings towards the usa .
in the case of this teenager accused of the hacking plot i think that is only right that he is tried in a british court of law , from what i have read ,the courts in the usa do hand down some barbaric sentences .



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 03:06 AM
link   
reply to post by tom.farnhill
 


No one can make him fly to the USA. If I was him, I would get a good lawyer. He is not a US citizen and not subject to US laws. All he would have to do is show that the US is attempting to hack into british networks or foreign networks and he is just defending himself from foreign attack.

I was under the impression that you have to be on US soil to commit a crime in the US?
edit on 22-6-2011 by THE_PROFESSIONAL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 22 2011 @ 03:48 AM
link   
I feel like if they can't trace the hacks back to everyone involved, then these guys are skilled enough to know how to elude the authorities, and there's no way a weak link that could be caught would be a "major player".





new topics

top topics



 
6
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join