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A minimalist BOB

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posted on May, 25 2011 @ 12:02 AM
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You need to look at the environment that you will be bailing into. If your going to be staying Urban (this includes running into the woods/forests but staying near the burbs) the bare minimums would suffice, clothing, knife, firearm (if your that way inclined) fire lighter, first aid kit, basically anything that would fit into a day pack. Staying near the cities/suburbs would mean scavaging what you need when you need it would be easier.

On the other side of the coin are the guys like myself who if the SHTF are more than happy and capable to grab an "assault" / trekking pack, head way into the hills and comfortably live off the land. Those people are honestly few and far between, yes the average joe will be able to do a few weeks but long term stuff takes alot of practise, skills and knowledge. Myself and a few friends are more than capable of taking everything we need to survive for months on end living of the land. We only take what we cannot get from the land, first aid kits, knives, cooking equipment, clothes, emergency rations, and the odds and ends like paracord, fishing line, sewing kits, small sleeping bag, single man tent etc.

We are all very avid bow hunters, and a couple of us can fletch therefore food is not going to be hard to come by for us.

But at the end of the day, you need to plan you BOB for your situation. I've got my hunting pack packed and ready to go at all times as we love to go hunting at the drop of a hat, but I also have a small day pack for a local SHTF situation




posted on May, 25 2011 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by BalderAsir
You need to look at the environment that you will be bailing into. If your going to be staying Urban (this includes running into the woods/forests but staying near the burbs) the bare minimums would suffice, clothing, knife, firearm (if your that way inclined) fire lighter, first aid kit, basically anything that would fit into a day pack. Staying near the cities/suburbs would mean scavaging what you need when you need it would be easier.

On the other side of the coin are the guys like myself who if the SHTF are more than happy and capable to grab an "assault" / trekking pack, head way into the hills and comfortably live off the land. Those people are honestly few and far between, yes the average joe will be able to do a few weeks but long term stuff takes alot of practise, skills and knowledge. Myself and a few friends are more than capable of taking everything we need to survive for months on end living of the land. We only take what we cannot get from the land, first aid kits, knives, cooking equipment, clothes, emergency rations, and the odds and ends like paracord, fishing line, sewing kits, small sleeping bag, single man tent etc.

We are all very avid bow hunters, and a couple of us can fletch therefore food is not going to be hard to come by for us.

But at the end of the day, you need to plan you BOB for your situation. I've got my hunting pack packed and ready to go at all times as we love to go hunting at the drop of a hat, but I also have a small day pack for a local SHTF situation


I agree for the most part, but here if you leave and go to the woods, and there are hundreds or thousands of otheres doing the same thing...hunting and foraging for food will be 100x harder....example, have you ever been out in the woods on opening day of deer season? imagine that x100, and you will quickly kill off wound or use up all the natural resources in the area...and have to move on...just like everyone else...then what...where to next?
If your in rural america and do that to a farmer on HIS land you might very well end up dead before you even know your being watched or seen.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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Survival Knife *
Leatherman Tool @
Canteen (metal)
Map (Local)
Tarp
Paracord
Ration Bars
Survival Water Packs
Pistol (.22) with Ammo
Lighters
Flashlight (batteries)
First Aid Kit (small)
Change of Clothes
Collapsing Water Jug
Folding Saw (try cutting up branches for a shelter with just a knife)
Machete
Camping Mess Kit (metal pan/plate, utensils)
Book of Edible Plants
Army Survival Guide
Spare keys to your vehicle and home (and those of any loved one)

* This knife has things like a compass, fishing tackle and line, matches, firestarter, etc.
@ Typically has screwdriver heads, pliers, smaller knife blades, small saw blade, etc.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:34 AM
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I would get exactly the same gear and equipment that I used while being an Arctic Ranger in the military, which was perfect for mobility and enough to carry around on my back to survive a SHTF situation alone in the wilderness of the Arctic.

I would probably also bring one hunting rifle, my fishing gear and one fishing net on top of that!

That's my BOB!



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 05:53 PM
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reply to post by saltdog
 


As I said, you have to plan for your environment. Where I come from, our state is larger than the united kingdom yet we have the population of less than 200,000. Take outta that there won't be alot of people skilled in bush craft I think we're right.

But at the end of the day, you need to make your own decisions based on your own situations.



posted on May, 26 2011 @ 03:20 PM
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You'll notice knowledge is on my list, in the form of a map of the local area, and paperback books that can tell you what is ok to eat, various bushcraft you don't know, etc.

I'm not even a big camper, but in my youth, we practically lived out in the woods each day (in Alaska)...but there are still plenty of things I know I don't know, and the space of a paperbook book is nothing compared to the knowledge in there.

I personally throw a deck of cards in there too. Amazing how boring it could be by yourself, and amazing how having such a thing could enable you to make friends in a SHTF scenario.

I don't care how much you've prepared, or how much you know....the REAL key to survival in a SHTF scenario, will be banding together with other people. GROUPS will have all of the advantages....



posted on May, 26 2011 @ 08:14 PM
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After clearing brush out of the way numerous times in the wake of the week's tornadoes, I've added the following to my car's GHB (get home bag):


folding camp saw

It folds like an oversize pocket-knife. Yet instead of a knife's blade, it has a tapering saw blade. Turns out the thing is better at cutting through downed tree limbs than any of the "real" saws in my garage. Just the thing.

And now I've always got one in the car, so I'm ready for crisis surgery, if that comes up.



posted on May, 30 2011 @ 10:23 PM
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Hi!
Since I have a bad back and trashed shoulder from an accident, my BOB cannot weigh much. I also enjoy backpacking as a way to test my own skills and make sure my gear will work for me when the time comes. Mind you, while my gear is expensive, I have done years of research on lightweight gear, and put this together over more than 2 years time, so the expense was spread out.

One must also remember the cardinal rule of being out in mother nature....Cotton Kills!!!! Cotton doesn't dry quickly when saturated, from rain or sweat, and that means potential hypothermia.

This is what I carry, and the weight, just so you get an idea of what can be done, for those of you who need to have your BOB remain as light as possible.

My List-
Tent- Henry Shire's Tarptent- one man plus room for gear- 1lb 8oz with 1.5 oz drop cloth under neath for protection. Can eliminate cloth, but comes in handy for other things like heavy rain and such.

Sleeping Bag- Marmot's 15F Helium- 2lb or Marmot's Coulior -0F-3lb Ratings for sleeping bags vary greatly, unless they are using the European standard. Western Mountaineering makes great sleeping bags for larger folks, or those who feel confined by a standard mummy bag. =)

Sleep Mat- Exped's Downmat 7 or (for warmer climes) Synmat light- 2lb 2 oz or 14oz - The Downmat 7 is used by Everest expeditions and is rated to well below zero. The Synmat is good to about +25F.

Clothing- wear synthetics that breathe well, remembering to layer for warmth where necessary. Merino wool or synthetic socks are recommended, with the 2 sock method being the best of all worlds. Carry 2 spare pairs of sox , or 4 (2 of each) to change out during the day if on your feet all day. Your feet are your foundation. Treat them well and they will perform. Mistreat them and they will surely let you know. Added weight for 2/4 pr socks, 4-6 oz.

Boots- Merrell makes some great boots, that wear well and are comfortable right out of the box. No break in necessary. Cost less than your usual hiking boots also.

Raingear- Lightweight top and bottom from Marmot. Weight about 1lb 1oz.

Water Purification- In a true SHTF scenario, one would most likely use boiling as the method to purify your water. However, a bandana comes in handy to filter out the chunks or bad things before hand. For hiking use, I carry Aqua Mira, weight 3 oz. There are many other water filters out there, from pump style to gravitational. All have their good points and bad. =)

Cooking- I would imagine one would use whatever was at hand..wood, cow chips, whatever...to cook your meals. For hiking use and practice, since fires aren't allowed in many parts of the USA in the woods, I use a tiny stove with a small propane/iso mix bottle. Stove- 3.4 oz, fuel, 7oz

Hygiene- as a gal, I am past the "monthly" routine. So I carry a small package of kleenex (individual size packs) and a bandana, along with a few baby wipes. The bandana of course is used as a "pee rag" and I keep it in its own bag, rinsing out once a day or so. Weight- under 3 oz total.

Compass- I carry a simple Brunson compass- weight 1 oz.

Sit pad- 1 oz- used to sit when resting...works great too for keeping your bum dry, or helping to keep sand and rocks out of your tent, or can even be used to help pad your hip or shoulder area if your sleeping pad isn't enough to keep you comfortable.

The whole idea here is to keep your weight below 12 lbs for base weight- not including food, fuel or water. Ideally below 10 lbs is best.

Last but not least=
Backpack- ULA (Ultra Light Adventures) Circuit- 2lb 8 oz 60 ltr. Plenty big enough to pack all my gear, plus at least 3 weeks food.


Peace!!!
SK



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