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The little things that make a crisis easier to deal with.

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CX

posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by AlreadyGone
 


Some great ones there, thank you.


Toilet paper is such a must....when TSHTF, you really don't want to run out of that!


CX.



CX

posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 01:34 PM
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reply to post by JDBlack
 


Ah i see.

Thanks for the explaination.


CX.



posted on Dec, 9 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


They sometimes come with carbon monoxide detecters. Another thing I just thought of, wood, nails and a hammer. After all, things do break, and being able to make temporary repares is important.


CX

posted on Dec, 16 2010 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by JDBlack
reply to post by CX
 


They sometimes come with carbon monoxide detecters. Another thing I just thought of, wood, nails and a hammer. After all, things do break, and being able to make temporary repares is important.


Good one, you can guarantee that you won't have them to hand when you need them, so a good supply of basic tools is a good idea.

Another simple one i like is to use denture tablet tubes for storing light/glow sticks. I just buy the cheapest tablets, give them to somone who needs them then use them as a tough waterproof case for the sticks...



I keep a few of these in my 72 hour bag and BOB, and one in each of my EDC backpacks.

Obviously you can store whatever you want in them, matches and other stuff you'd like to keep dry.

CX.



posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


I fully understand the lighter and think that is a spot on idea. I'm not so understanding of the Chem-light. Can you...wait for the pun...enlighten me?


CX

posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by Sideband
reply to post by CX
 


I fully understand the lighter and think that is a spot on idea. I'm not so understanding of the Chem-light. Can you...wait for the pun...enlighten me?


Lol very funny


Now i'm unsure if thats a proper question or a joke lol.


Just incase it was a genuine question though, the chem light, or glow sticks/light sticks as they are often called are filled with a liquid that reacts when crushed. A more detailed description is here...


What is a Lightstick and How Does it Operate?
Lightsticks or glowsticks are used by trick-or-treaters, divers, campers, and for decoration and fun! A lightstick is a plastic tube with a glass vial inside of it. In order to activate a lightstick, you bend the plastic stick, which breaks the glass vial. This allows the chemicals that were inside the glass to mix with the chemicals in the plastic tube. Once these substances contact each other, a reaction starts taking place. The reaction releases light, causing the stick to glow!

Source: How Do Lightsticks Work?


So here is an unused one...



They are tough, don't get me wrong, so will take a little bashing, but to be totaly sure they don't break in your bag you can put them in the tubes i describe above.

Here is a cool video explaining them too, complete with glow stick disection.




Hope that is usefull info for anyone.


CX.
edit on 18/12/10 by CX because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


It was a real question, but I guess my attempt at houmor masked it. I know what a chem light is. My question is, why attach one to the side of a lantern? Isn't that kind of like taping a candle to the side of a flashlight?


CX

posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 05:52 PM
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Originally posted by Sideband
reply to post by CX
 


It was a real question, but I guess my attempt at houmor masked it. I know what a chem light is. My question is, why attach one to the side of a lantern? Isn't that kind of like taping a candle to the side of a flashlight?


Aha, i gotcha now.


Yes i guess it doesn't make much sense, but whether if it be for me or if i was giving the lamp to someone else who needed it, i thought it would be handy to have a spare light source attached.

If the lamp fuel runs out, you have another 8 or 12 hours of light attached to it without having to run around looking for one.

Just saves time i guess, and like i said, if i give one to someone i know they have heat for a few hours and many hour of light whether it be from the lantern or the glowstick.

CX.



posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


No. Explained that way it makes sense. I was just wondering if there was something else I was missing. Thanks.



posted on Dec, 18 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


Add 6 to 10 feet of cord to the light stick. Spin it over your head in a circle. This helicopter blade effect is an unmistakeable distress signal at night.

Hawklover


CX

posted on Dec, 19 2010 @ 04:23 AM
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Originally posted by Hawklover
reply to post by CX
 


Add 6 to 10 feet of cord to the light stick. Spin it over your head in a circle. This helicopter blade effect is an unmistakeable distress signal at night.

Hawklover


What an excellent idea.


Also, you can crack the stick and use the neon liquid for a trail marker or similar at night. When i was 17 and used to frequent raves, i covered my dancing shoes in the stuff and it kept glowing for months. Don't judge me, i was young and stupid.


Also stuck some on my backpack so the traffic couldn't miss me.

CX.



posted on Dec, 21 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by CX

Originally posted by JDBlackHow well do they do in the wind, rain, etc?


To be honest i'm not sure how they are outside.

Next bit of wind i get here, i'll check them out.

I don't think they are waterproof though and the top gets very hot so covering it wouldn't be an option. Will have a think about that one.

CX.


A good lantern should tolerate a windless heavy rain
It should tolerate a high wind. Try holding it in front of a fan.

Lanterns of decent construction that are assembled properly are “self extinguishing” when tipped over. As long as the glass doesn’t break. And as long as you are using the proper fuel.

Try it some time. Take it outside somewhere safe and tip it over. It should go out.

The problem with a lot of the cheaper lamps is the burner doesn’t fit properly into the fuel tank and it allows fuel to splash out between the large gap.

Some of the larger lamps can tolerate a strong wind blown rain without going out.



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