Best Digital Camera/Video Camera for Capturing UFO's?

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posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:33 AM
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I have been watching the skies intensely as of late and it has greatly increased my need for some type of documenting device. I figure many of you have had experience with this and would like some advice. I am not exactly able to spring for anything top shelf, however can probably spend in the neighborhood of 100-150. Would I be better suited with a digital camera? Any advice helps, just trying to make sure I can get a clear shot of what i'm seeing more up close.



CX

posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:41 AM
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Thanks for posting this, i have been wondering about the same thing too.


I realise much of what we would love to photograpgh is going to be well beyond the reach of most normal cameras, especially with a budget of just a couple of hundred pounds, but it would be nice to get some info on lens sizes and what ranges they can show things clear at.

I reckon half of the battle is finding something to stabilize the camera with when shooting, i understand a tripod may not always be practical, but there are other ways.

There is too much UFO footage that could have been fantastic footage, had they only steadied their hand on a wall or similar.

CX.



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:55 AM
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Google is your friend :

Paranormal Investigations

Not sure about the prices but that is the link I found instantly when searching for UFO Camera's



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:57 AM
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I think just having one around of decent quality is probably good enough if you don't pull the usual zoom in zoom out while shaking like abrowning before his morning coffee thing.

I agree with the previous poster that stabilizing the camera is VERY important. Use anything you can to stabilize it. Keep both eyes open, one on the target, one on the viewfinder and you will see the over panning go down as well.

I think other than that just buy the best you can afford. There are a TON of guides online rating cameras (I would go with something that can at least do video). Just google best camera < whatever you can afford.
edit on 5-10-2010 by abrowning because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:59 AM
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In my opinion the best device for capturing UFOs is a FILM camera. Go old school. With so much CGI out there having a true negative that can be inspected is rock solid. With video, the better and more spectacular the captured event is, the less likely people believe it. Just take a look at all the UFO video on this site and you will see what I mean. Using film with video is a great way as well. Take a photo first with film and video the event after.



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 05:23 AM
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Originally posted by d00d557 Any advice helps, just trying to make sure I can get a clear shot of what i'm seeing more up close.


If it's an Alien spaceship or a black ops craft using any type of plasma effect on its surface or EM shielding you will get a blurry image...

If its a "Critter', being energy in nature you will get a blurry picture...

If you get a clear sharp image of a UFO in midair... I am likely to call it fake


What you want is extremely high shutter speed...

So you can capture the orbs... errrr fog droplets




edit on 5-10-2010 by zorgon because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 05:38 AM
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I don't think I've seen a digital camera or video camera made for this purpose yet (no disc-shaped UFO icon on my Canon G10),

Nevertheless, if you're buying a digital camera/video camera for the purpose of skywatching, here are my thoughts.

You need a high quality, high definition camera that compensates well for the particular conditions required (outdoor, nighttime, contrast, etc). You probably need a similar type of camera/video camera as bird watchers do, so check specialized BW forums for particular brands and models.

Infrared seems to be an interesting spectrum when it comes to UFOs. Digital cameras have a special infrared-blocking filter in front of the light-sensitive CCD array, as the IR light degrades the visible-light color rendition (the CCD itself reacts to wavelengths up to 1000 nanometers and even longer).

Although, I've heard through the grapewine that some of the high end Olympus cameras have a better IR sensitivity than most, and some of the Sony models (Sony DSC-F707/717/818) allow you to move the anti-IR filter out of the light's way.

You will have to check further on this though, since I'm not an expert in any sense.



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 08:38 AM
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Greetings,

To be honest, photography [digital or 35mm] wont be any good for capturing subjects at night as a long exposure is needed, thus resulting in blurry images. Believe me, im a photographer by trade and have had to invest in an HD camcorder with low light shooting.

If your going to do it properly, purchase a half decent camcoder


Just my 20quids worth


Be safe be well

Spiro



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 04:41 PM
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Originally posted by QuantumDisciple
In my opinion the best device for capturing UFOs is a FILM camera. Go old school. With so much CGI out there having a true negative that can be inspected is rock solid. With video, the better and more spectacular the captured event is, the less likely people believe it. Just take a look at all the UFO video on this site and you will see what I mean. Using film with video is a great way as well. Take a photo first with film and video the event after.


Photography can be a nice hobby and adds an extra dimension to sky watching. Film cameras are on the way out. Fewer places carry the film and fewer still do developing. Ask yourself what you are going to do with any halfway decent picture you get of a UFO.

What will film prints prove, even the ngatives? How would you get a film picture to ATS or anwhere easily without it being scanned and digitalized? Film cameras just aren't practical anymore.

Keep in mind that no picture of a UFO, regardless of the camera used, clarity, or even other witnesses, will ever be accepted as proof across the board. Debunkers and denyers will always do their job. So go at this expecting to please yourself but nobody else. just get a decent digital camera with the best optical zoom you can get (forget digital zoom) and go for it. A pawn shop may have exactly what you want at a price you can afford.

There are instructional videos on You Tube for rigging up an infared camera.



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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reply to post by d00d557
 


I'm a UFO Hunter. By that I mean that whenever I'm outside I sky-watch so that I can be ready to videotape not just UFOs but any unusual aerial phenomena. I make an effort to improve my chances looking for that elusive target by training myself to constantly scan the sky not just in front of me but all around. UFOs are not going to always appear in your frontal line of sight so you have to look behind you and to the sides as well. Stopping at an intersection and waiting for the light to change gives you a chance to to scan the sky 360º. It takes an effort to constantly look up but doing so additionally provides many pleasant aerial surprises that most fail to notice. I wear Polarized sunglasses which make it easier to locate objects in the sky as the glasses not only prevent glare, keeping your eyes from being fatigued, but also at certain angles they darken the sky dramatically making white or silvery objects such as planes, helicopters, and certain birds such as seagulls stand out. Don't rule out anything that you see out of hand until you've gone through a quick mental check of possibilities. These include balloons, debris, birds, and aircraft. Airplanes at high altitudes may make you think twice since, usually, the wings are not as noticeable as the fuselage but recognition is almost instantaneous no matter how high it is. Helicopters are rarely seen at high altitudes and their loud engines will precede their appearance. Not so with balloons which will be the ones that will make you reach for your camcorder. Additionally, there are the added anomalous aerial attractions such as sun dogs, displays of rainbow-like colors, etc. The main point is to remember to look up every once in a while.

Prior to the advent of the camcorder very few carried movie film cameras, mostly tourists. Not only were they bulky and heavy but the more common 8mm (and later the Super 8) had a limit of 4 minutes worth of recording per film roll. As with still cameras, the film had to be taken to the nearby drugstore for processing which took days and the processing was expensive. It was always a mystery while you waited for the processed film to be returned because you didn't really know if you were successful at capturing what you saw and whether you were successful or not, you still had to pay the processing fees. And to see what you filmed you needed a film projector. Even less carried the bigger and heavier 16mm movie cameras. Because of the carrying facility and their lighter weight and the extended recording time with immediate playback sans processing and processing fees, millions of individuals are carrying camcorders especially the newer models which are a marvel of miniature electronics, some with featuring an optical zoom range of up to 40X! Not to mention the additional digital zoom range which goes beyond usability. Thanks to this accessibility, UFOs are being recorded all over the world with more frequency and some of these videos are available on the Internet on sites devoted to UFO videos. While camcorders, analog and digital, make hoaxing of UFOs easier, it can't be said that every camcorder owner is intent on deceiving. So we have to accept that at least the majority of UFO videos are of real objects, in all of their variety.

I was fortunate to have videotaped a UFO in 2004. But let me caution you, no matter how prepared you think you are, as I thought I was, the experience can still be unnerving to the point where if it's over in seconds, as mine was, you may forget the initial details of what was happening prior to your starting to tape although, thankfully, you may still wind up with a priceless videotape. If you always carry a camcorder and/or a film or digital still camera, you may find this article interesting and educating. Before I proceed let me digress momentarily and describe my recent sightings and how I blew those opportunities to videotape 4 UFOs.

On the same day that I videotaped the UFO and prior to that I had seen another one flying above the broken cloud cover and as it disappeared into the clouds I watched to see if it would appear where there was a patch of open sky ahead of it and it did. Unfortunately, in my excitement I engaged a nearby stranger to be a witness and in trying to point out the UFO I forgot that I had my camcorder and it wasn't until the UFO was out of sight before I awoke to that fact. After that mental failure I swore that I would be ready the next time, if there was going to be a next time. The next time was, surprisingly, later that day and I was able to videotape a UFO but, again, it was almost a failure and I wound up with only a few seconds of videotape when it could have been longer. To cut to the chase, I was positioned unsteadily on steep stairs and the moment I saw the UFO through the lens, I tried to steady myself but lost my footing and almost fell.

About week after I videotaped the UFO and while standing at a bus stop I looked up and saw a solitary, small, wispy cloud in a clear sky and through it I could see a round, white object. The cloud was stationary and so was the object. Without taking my eyes off the object I reached for my camcorder which was in a shoulder bag, put my hand through the grip, removed the lens cover while turning it on and brought it up to my eyes, automatically zooming the lens to its widest ratio so that I could zoom in on the object after I located the cloud in the viewfinder. If the camcorder's lens is not at its widest, you may not be able to find the object in time since it will be like looking though a telescope. When I looked through the viewfinder I saw nothing! The viewfinder indicator said MAGICVU and I realized I had not disabled that (infra-red) feature after experimenting with it by taping fireflies in the backyard the night before. I had to take the camcorder away from my eyes to find the MAGICVU ON/OFF switch and after I did so, which took just a few seconds, I looked up at the cloud but the object was gone. Before you leave your house, examine your camcorder and make sure it's ready to go. This includes battery condition, looking through the viewfinder to see that the appropriate settings have been made, etc.

My last sighting happened a short time after the above and this time it was a superb sighting. Unfortunately, violating my own "always be ready" rule, I didn't carry my camcorder! As I turned a corner I automatically looked up and couldn't believe what I was seeing. Not only was the object extremely low but it didn't move except for a slow rotation. Thinking balloon, as they are regularly seen over New York City, I stopped and stared at it. Since I was really craning my neck, a passerby noticed and came to my side asking what I was staring at. When I pointed out the dark, round object we started comparing notes. It was round, obviously large and not a low-altitude balloon. It was stationary. We kept staring at the object, whatever it was, for about 5 minutes! Finally we both noticed that it seemed to rise very slowly and the young man walked away, convinced he had seen a UFO. I kept looking at it and I could swear that I saw the round object elongate for an instant and return to its round shape. But I thought that it might have been due to eye fatigue. Instead of great footage all I have is great memories. My camcorder is now always at my side whenever I go out.

The one certain thing about UFOs is that you never know when you'll see one let alone tape one. So the first rule in looking for UFOs is that when you see something interesting, don't look away even for a second. A couple of times I saw black balloons held together by a string. There was no doubt they were balloons with a sky full of fluffy white clouds so they stood out quite clearly. I decided to tape them just for reference but the same thing happened with both balloons: I took my eyes away from them while I removed the camcorder from my shoulder bag and when I looked up again I couldn't find either one. I don't know what I would have seen if I had kept my eyes on them but it seemed like they were plucked from the sky when I looked away. Balloons are the closest aerial object when it comes to thinking that you're seeing a UFO(s). Individual ones and groups, sometimes tied together so that they revolve around each other. Because of the occasional high winds you may see a loner catch up to a group and possibly pass them. You never know and it's better to err on the side of caution than to make an outright judgement which could be wrong. Once you've identified the object in your video as a balloon, or balloons, you can always erase the tape.

There are two types of UFOs: moving ones and stationary ones. Moving objects could be anything. But a stationary one is food for thought. If it's moving you have to act quickly and hope to get an adequate image. But if it's stationary do all you can to videotape it in the best possible quality, from resting your arm on a nearby support to including points of reference such as buildings, trees, etc. Since the experience may make you nervous always have the EIS (Electronic Image Stabilizer) or OIS (Optical Image Stabilizer) activated. This is to minimize camera shake at a high zoom ratio, particularly when using the digital zoom which can go up to 800X and higher in some camcorders (digital zoom beyond 2X makes the image unusable especially when blowing the footage up - I prefer to use optical zoom only which on my digital camcorder goes up to 20X). If there is no nearby support, use your free hand to make a steadying platform by making a fist and resting the camcorder on it or use it to cradle the bottom of the camcorder. If you try to support the camcorder with your open hand you may induce unwanted movement. My camcorder employs a second EIS during playback to further steady the recorded image.

I suggest that you look through the viewfinder instead of relying on the LCD monitor 'cause you may not be able to see the UFO on the little screen and you'll have to look for it with your naked eyes and this could cause you to lose the UFO. While looking through the viewfinder, I also open my free eye to compare views. Your camcorder's autofocusing could also result in "hunting" (focusing in and out and losing the image momentarily) so if you see this happening, switch to manual focus. My camcorder makes this easy to do as it has a focus ring around the lens, similar in operation to a single-lens reflex camera, making fine-tuning a snap. With most camcorders this is a difficult task as they employ a small, thumb-operated wheel which doesn't allow fine tuning.

Now that you have videotaped a UFO and you're sure it's not a balloon or other object, what do you do with the footage? Besides showing it to your family and friends you can publicize it many ways from Internet sites to the local media. If you decide to cash in on your good fortune, first acquaint yourself with video rights so that when the time comes you don't make the wrong decision and lose your rights to your footage. The Internet is a great resource to learn all about rights. If you deal with media, make sure that a dub of your video is done and your original is returned to you. Better yet, you make the dub and submit that to them. However, if you head straight to a local TV station after shooting the UFO and they're interested in airing it, do not let them have the videotape before you've reached an agreement over rights. Now, go out there and start staring at the sky!



posted on Oct, 5 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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Originally posted by d00d557
I have been watching the skies intensely as of late and it has greatly increased my need for some type of documenting device. I figure many of you have had experience with this and would like some advice. I am not exactly able to spring for anything top shelf, however can probably spend in the neighborhood of 100-150. Would I be better suited with a digital camera? Any advice helps, just trying to make sure I can get a clear shot of what i'm seeing more up close.



I swear by the older Sony cameras with the X ray capabilities, I have a TRV615.. Filming during daylight hours using a 950nm IR filter and in "nightshot" mode I see and film a lot of objects not visable through normal filming.


A compilation of strange objects I have filmed over the past few years.
All have been Filmed during daylight hours using a Sony Hi8 with a 950nm IR filter and in Nightshot mode... Hence the Green color of the videos




posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 05:20 AM
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I was going to post a same thread, Im off to HK in 2 weeks to do a visa run and was hoping to pick up a decent cam for the exact same reason.
With regards to the Sony Night Shot cams, I used to own 1, great fun but with out a filter to block out the passive light you wont be able to see past a few meters. For night shooting the sony cams move the IR filter out of the way so you can film in the IR range. Problem is though they rely on a IR light source (the cams have a built in source). So you can only see as far as the light shines. Unless you can get hold of a passive light blocking filter they are not much use for ufo hunting but great forr ghost hunting indoors.
If you turn on the night shot mode in daylight the screen just goes white. This was done to stop the X-ray effect by sony (
). You can mod a night-shot cam to remedy this though but you will have to search google for the instructions.

My advice is to try get an old but decent mega-pixal cam off the net, maybe e-bay and mod it yourself. Unfortunately i dont have a credit card so i can buy online so i will be hunting 1 down in HK in 1 of the used electronics shops.



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by The Shrike
reply to post by d00d557
 


I'm a UFO Hunter. By that I mean that whenever I'm outside I sky-watch so that I can be ready to videotape not just UFOs but any unusual aerial phenomena. I make an effort to improve my chances looking for that elusive target by training myself to constantly scan the sky not just in front of me but all around. UFOs are not going to always appear in your frontal line of sight so you have to look behind you and to the sides as well. Stopping at an intersection and waiting for the light to change gives you a chance to to scan the sky 360º. It takes an effort to constantly look up but doing so additionally provides many pleasant aerial surprises that most fail to notice. I wear Polarized sunglasses which make it easier to locate objects in the sky as the glasses not only prevent glare, keeping your eyes from being fatigued, but also at certain angles they darken the sky dramatically making white or silvery objects such as planes, helicopters, and certain birds such as seagulls stand out. Don't rule out anything that you see out of hand until you've gone through a quick mental check of possibilities. These include balloons, debris, birds, and aircraft. Airplanes at high altitudes may make you think twice since, usually, the wings are not as noticeable as the fuselage but recognition is almost instantaneous no matter how high it is. Helicopters are rarely seen at high altitudes and their loud engines will precede their appearance. Not so with balloons which will be the ones that will make you reach for your camcorder. Additionally, there are the added anomalous aerial attractions such as sun dogs, displays of rainbow-like colors, etc. The main point is to remember to look up every once in a while.

Prior to the advent of the camcorder very few carried movie film cameras, mostly tourists. Not only were they bulky and heavy but the more common 8mm (and later the Super 8) had a limit of 4 minutes worth of recording per film roll. As with still cameras, the film had to be taken to the nearby drugstore for processing which took days and the processing was expensive. It was always a mystery while you waited for the processed film to be returned because you didn't really know if you were successful at capturing what you saw and whether you were successful or not, you still had to pay the processing fees. And to see what you filmed you needed a film projector. Even less carried the bigger and heavier 16mm movie cameras. Because of the carrying facility and their lighter weight and the extended recording time with immediate playback sans processing and processing fees, millions of individuals are carrying camcorders especially the newer models which are a marvel of miniature electronics, some with featuring an optical zoom range of up to 40X! Not to mention the additional digital zoom range which goes beyond usability. Thanks to this accessibility, UFOs are being recorded all over the world with more frequency and some of these videos are available on the Internet on sites devoted to UFO videos. While camcorders, analog and digital, make hoaxing of UFOs easier, it can't be said that every camcorder owner is intent on deceiving. So we have to accept that at least the majority of UFO videos are of real objects, in all of their variety.

I was fortunate to have videotaped a UFO in 2004. But let me caution you, no matter how prepared you think you are, as I thought I was, the experience can still be unnerving to the point where if it's over in seconds, as mine was, you may forget the initial details of what was happening prior to your starting to tape although, thankfully, you may still wind up with a priceless videotape. If you always carry a camcorder and/or a film or digital still camera, you may find this article interesting and educating. Before I proceed let me digress momentarily and describe my recent sightings and how I blew those opportunities to videotape 4 UFOs.

On the same day that I videotaped the UFO and prior to that I had seen another one flying above the broken cloud cover and as it disappeared into the clouds I watched to see if it would appear where there was a patch of open sky ahead of it and it did. Unfortunately, in my excitement I engaged a nearby stranger to be a witness and in trying to point out the UFO I forgot that I had my camcorder and it wasn't until the UFO was out of sight before I awoke to that fact. After that mental failure I swore that I would be ready the next time, if there was going to be a next time. The next time was, surprisingly, later that day and I was able to videotape a UFO but, again, it was almost a failure and I wound up with only a few seconds of videotape when it could have been longer. To cut to the chase, I was positioned unsteadily on steep stairs and the moment I saw the UFO through the lens, I tried to steady myself but lost my footing and almost fell.

About week after I videotaped the UFO and while standing at a bus stop I looked up and saw a solitary, small, wispy cloud in a clear sky and through it I could see a round, white object. The cloud was stationary and so was the object. Without taking my eyes off the object I reached for my camcorder which was in a shoulder bag, put my hand through the grip, removed the lens cover while turning it on and brought it up to my eyes, automatically zooming the lens to its widest ratio so that I could zoom in on the object after I located the cloud in the viewfinder. If the camcorder's lens is not at its widest, you may not be able to find the object in time since it will be like looking though a telescope. When I looked through the viewfinder I saw nothing! The viewfinder indicator said MAGICVU and I realized I had not disabled that (infra-red) feature after experimenting with it by taping fireflies in the backyard the night before. I had to take the camcorder away from my eyes to find the MAGICVU ON/OFF switch and after I did so, which took just a few seconds, I looked up at the cloud but the object was gone. Before you leave your house, examine your camcorder and make sure it's ready to go. This includes battery condition, looking through the viewfinder to see that the appropriate settings have been made, etc.

My last sighting happened a short time after the above and this time it was a superb sighting. Unfortunately, violating my own "always be ready" rule, I didn't carry my camcorder! As I turned a corner I automatically looked up and couldn't believe what I was seeing. Not only was the object extremely low but it didn't move except for a slow rotation. Thinking balloon, as they are regularly seen over New York City, I stopped and stared at it. Since I was really craning my neck, a passerby noticed and came to my side asking what I was staring at. When I pointed out the dark, round object we started comparing notes. It was round, obviously large and not a low-altitude balloon. It was stationary. We kept staring at the object, whatever it was, for about 5 minutes! Finally we both noticed that it seemed to rise very slowly and the young man walked away, convinced he had seen a UFO. I kept looking at it and I could swear that I saw the round object elongate for an instant and return to its round shape. But I thought that it might have been due to eye fatigue. Instead of great footage all I have is great memories. My camcorder is now always at my side whenever I go out.

The one certain thing about UFOs is that you never know when you'll see one let alone tape one. So the first rule in looking for UFOs is that when you see something interesting, don't look away even for a second. A couple of times I saw black balloons held together by a string. There was no doubt they were balloons with a sky full of fluffy white clouds so they stood out quite clearly. I decided to tape them just for reference but the same thing happened with both balloons: I took my eyes away from them while I removed the camcorder from my shoulder bag and when I looked up again I couldn't find either one. I don't know what I would have seen if I had kept my eyes on them but it seemed like they were plucked from the sky when I looked away. Balloons are the closest aerial object when it comes to thinking that you're seeing a UFO(s). Individual ones and groups, sometimes tied together so that they revolve around each other. Because of the occasional high winds you may see a loner catch up to a group and possibly pass them. You never know and it's better to err on the side of caution than to make an outright judgement which could be wrong. Once you've identified the object in your video as a balloon, or balloons, you can always erase the tape.

There are two types of UFOs: moving ones and stationary ones. Moving objects could be anything. But a stationary one is food for thought. If it's moving you have to act quickly and hope to get an adequate image. But if it's stationary do all you can to videotape it in the best possible quality, from resting your arm on a nearby support to including points of reference such as buildings, trees, etc. Since the experience may make you nervous always have the EIS (Electronic Image Stabilizer) or OIS (Optical Image Stabilizer) activated. This is to minimize camera shake at a high zoom ratio, particularly when using the digital zoom which can go up to 800X and higher in some camcorders (digital zoom beyond 2X makes the image unusable especially when blowing the footage up - I prefer to use optical zoom only which on my digital camcorder goes up to 20X). If there is no nearby support, use your free hand to make a steadying platform by making a fist and resting the camcorder on it or use it to cradle the bottom of the camcorder. If you try to support the camcorder with your open hand you may induce unwanted movement. My camcorder employs a second EIS during playback to further steady the recorded image.

I suggest that you look through the viewfinder instead of relying on the LCD monitor 'cause you may not be able to see the UFO on the little screen and you'll have to look for it with your naked eyes and this could cause you to lose the UFO. While looking through the viewfinder, I also open my free eye to compare views. Your camcorder's autofocusing could also result in "hunting" (focusing in and out and losing the image momentarily) so if you see this happening, switch to manual focus. My camcorder makes this easy to do as it has a focus ring around the lens, similar in operation to a single-lens reflex camera, making fine-tuning a snap. With most camcorders this is a difficult task as they employ a small, thumb-operated wheel which doesn't allow fine tuning.

Now that you have videotaped a UFO and you're sure it's not a balloon or other object, what do you do with the footage? Besides showing it to your family and friends you can publicize it many ways from Internet sites to the local media. If you decide to cash in on your good fortune, first acquaint yourself with video rights so that when the time comes you don't make the wrong decision and lose your rights to your footage. The Internet is a great resource to learn all about rights. If you deal with media, make sure that a dub of your video is done and your original is returned to you. Better yet, you make the dub and submit that to them. However, if you head straight to a local TV station after shooting the UFO and they're interested in airing it, do not let them have the videotape before you've reached an agreement over rights. Now, go out there and start staring at the sky!


www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by GammaRayBurst
 


I am also into using Near Infrared for day-time UFO filming. I used to have three old analogue Sony camcorders (2 x TRV615 and 1 x TRV95). I have also converted some Sony Digital 8 camcorders (TRV310 and TRV510). Digital is better for picture quality. Nowadays I don't even use Sony. Instead I use a converted digital camcorder.

The sort of footage that you have provided is something that can be seen almost anyday with daytime nightshot. There are diverse things flying about in the sky. They range from solid objects to just flashes of light. What is seen in this particular footage of yours is what I believe to be some form of intelligent 'light' beings rather than crafts.Sometimes you can even catch what appears to be an organic craft - i.e giant living object.

What I really want to say in response to the OP is that a camcorder is always better than a still camera for capturing UFO. It is essential to capture movement or else it is all flat and meaningless.



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 06:08 PM
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This is what you need.

usa.canon.com...

A bit pricey but set on the video setting it is state of the art for indy film makers.



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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How much money can you/are you willing to spend? That's an important question.

I very recently got a very nice Sony 'pro-sumer' (professional+consumer quality) camera, the HDR-AX2000, but that's because I am going to be using it to shoot indie films/documentary material, etc. It's a $3500 camera, though I got a used one in flawless shape from B&H for $2800. (This camera doesn't have low-light shooting capability, btw, so if that's what you want to do, this one isn't for you.)

Now, most likely you aren't looking to spend quite that much, but Sony does offer less expensive cameras that offer many of the same features so you might look into that. Sony makes fantastic cameras and use great lenses.

One thing about the AX2000 that could be useful for any UFO hunter is the 20x zoom lens - seems to me a great zoom lens like that should be key, if you can find something cheaper that is comparable. I would also go 1080 HD, because the higher the resolution you film with, the better the chance whatever you are seeing can be well resolved and studied.

Get yourself the biggest battery possible for your camera, and get two or more of them if you plan to be out in the field. A good external charger could be useful, too. These ain't cheap, either. The big batteries for the AX2000 are about $100 each, as is the double charger. But, you don't want to be out in the middle of nowhere filming and suddenly your batteries die - if that happens, then the camera is useless, so extra batteries are key and one or two extras are a good idea, too, because sometimes they can just fail on you or they don't carry the charge they are supposed to. I'm using some good Sony batteries and haven't had these problems yet, but I know pros who have gone through this on documentary shoots - photo shoots, etc. It can ruin your shooting day if you aren't prepared with back-ups.



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 06:31 PM
link   

Originally posted by QuantumDisciple
In my opinion the best device for capturing UFOs is a FILM camera. Go old school. With so much CGI out there having a true negative that can be inspected is rock solid. With video, the better and more spectacular the captured event is, the less likely people believe it. Just take a look at all the UFO video on this site and you will see what I mean. Using film with video is a great way as well. Take a photo first with film and video the event after.


you know Ive kinda been thinking this myself. you know there are some very reasonable older movie film motion picture cameras being sold on Ebay, that will shoot panoramic views and pull tight focuses. although I'm not quite sure what the film and developing would cost? but if you could film in black and white, you might be able to pull some amazing footage when the opportunity presented its self.



posted on Oct, 6 2010 @ 11:29 PM
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reply to post by big_BHOY
 


Thanks for finding that, I forgot all about it.





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