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Sunspot 1087 growing / Solar Update

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posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


Thanks for adding those updated and awesome pictures! I appreciate everyones input as well...

Everything seems quiet at the moment. Checking earthquake activity as we should be getting hit by the 1st wave now although minor.




posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by TheDon
What I find interesting is the appearance of sun spot 1088, and when you look at the images you can see a alignment, so does that mean that our chances of being hit by a CME as doubled now as the sun spots continue on their path to align with earth?

It looks like we will soon find out.

Peace


Sunspot 1088 has faded with no flares...



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 03:50 PM
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Yeah im just trying to get to grips on how all this solor stuff works. Its kinda like a lerning curve for me but anyway. This x ray image shows a rise in something and i wonder if it will affect us?

www.solarcycle24.com...



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by DeepestOne
 


I dont think we have to worry until it reachs past 'M' or 'X', its a 'C' at the minute.

" Scientists classify solar flares according to their x-ray brightness in the wavelength range 1 to 8 Angstroms. There are 3 categories: X-class flares are big; they are major events that can trigger planet-wide radio blackouts and long-lasting radiation storms. M-class flares are medium-sized; they can cause brief radio blackouts that affect Earth's polar regions. Minor radiation storms sometimes follow an M-class flare. Compared to X- and M-class events, C-class flares are small with few noticeable consequences here on Earth."

spaceweather.com



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


Thanks for that so its the X's that we have to worry about. Right about now it seems like the sun and the spot are facing right at us so is right now all or nothing. Once it spins past does that mean were in the clear?

Soz about the questions just trying to educate myself quick



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by Lady_Tuatha
 


Thanks Lady T,

I was about to post the same, but ATS seemed to be hit by an M Class flare as I got a server error for the last 5 min. LOL



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by DeepestOne
 


Yes it usually is the case, 1087 had a major flare on the 9th, while coming around into view...



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:34 PM
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Just wondering - is there anyway to confirm when we get hit with an M flare? As the sun is facing earth right now - should we expect more outages, etc.?



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


The way I understand it is it takes 2 days for a C class to hit earth, an M Class depending on solar winds could possibly hit in a few hours time. Thankfully we have protection against it mostly, but things floating around in space don't, satellites etc.

So the sun is facing us now and that C class that just happened should hit the day after tomorrow.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 05:14 PM
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This is the HMI Magnetogram composite 14 July 2010




3-day Solar-Geophysical Forecast issued Jul 14 22:00 UTC Solar Activity Forecast: Solar activity is expected to be very low to low. There is a slight chance for an isolated M-class event from Region 1087.

Geophysical Activity Forecast: The geomagnetic field is expected to be unsettled with a chance for isolated active periods on day one (15 July) due to a coronal hole high speed stream. Quiet conditions are expected to return on days two and three (16-17 July).


www.swpc.noaa.gov...



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by redeyedwonder
 

You are confusing solar flares with Coronal Mass Ejections.

A solar flare is a burst of electromagnetic energy (sometimes accompanied by high energy particles) and arrives at Earth about 8 minutes after it occurs (speed of light). The class of a solar flare is a measure of the intensity of the x-ray energy released. The radiation is released in all directions from the source, it is not really directional. If it is on our side of the Sun, it will "hit" us.

A CME is a burst of material from the Sun and travels at much less than the speed of light. The products of a CME usually take about 3 or 4 days to arrive, however in the case of the Carrington Event (1859) it may have only taken 18 hours. CMEs are directional, whether or not they hit Earth depends on where it was headed when released and how fast it travels. If it was aimed at where Earth is now, it could miss us by the time it gets here because we will have moved out of the way (a bit). CMEs are not classed, other than; "Holy crap! That was a big 'un!"

While CMEs are often associated with solar flares it is not always the case.

[edit on 7/14/2010 by Phage]



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by redeyedwonder
 



Great info - wasn't sure how long it took an M flare to arrive! So since it would interfere with satellites then it would also interfere with communications on earth.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Thank you Phage,

I appreciate the input and I know you have studied these things a long time. So I did get them a little mixed you are right about the CME's. I also forgot that we as a planet move so the CME might never hit us dead on.

I also thought you were right about the quake thing, it only made sense to list the larger ones for a comparison, its a shame people only believe what they want to believe. Keep up the good fight.



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by crazydaisy
 


and our antiquated electrical grids as well.

2nd line



posted on Jul, 14 2010 @ 06:18 PM
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Current Coronal Hole - July 14, 2010




posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 08:15 AM
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Sunspot 1087 is starting to slowly shrink in size as the magnetic pool begins to break apart. There will remain the chance for B-Class flares and perhaps a C-Class flare.

A brief period of geomagnetic storming was observed and this was caused by a southward Bz and increasing solar wind.

Looks like a non event, I sure thought with the huge flare on the 9th, that we were going to see at least one more.

I want to thank everyone who posted in this thread. I will see you all in other threads I'm sure. Thanks.



posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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Why is the latest Lasco 3 image this:
sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...




posted on Jul, 15 2010 @ 02:07 PM
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Lol, I dont know, I just downloaded the current .gif and it only looks like that in the last frame, must be some error or something
(edit - or maybe nibiru is coming!
)

[edit on 15-7-2010 by CREAM]

[edit on 15-7-2010 by CREAM]

[edit on 15-7-2010 by CREAM]




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