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‘Top kill’ stops oil leak says US Admiral...(Maybe?)

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posted on May, 28 2010 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Thank you for pointing out what I had been missing! For whatever reason, it had not occurred to me that there would be restrictions and other places in the pipe where the mud would be able to stick. I was thinking it would be like filling the barrel of a gun with mud, then firing a bullet and expecting the mud to not be expelled. However, with kinks and valves and other stuff in the pipe that the mud would be able to cling to, I can see how it might build up a blockage over time. And I especially like the artery analogy.




Originally posted by getreadyalready

BP's lack of mud and shortcutting by using too much sea water during the drilling process is what allowed the original Methane bubble to traverse the pipe and cause the explosion.


Question: was this BP's fault, or the fault of the company BP hired to perform the drillling? Source please?




posted on May, 28 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by curioustype
Anyone seen this, appearing post 'Top-Kill' failure as far as I recall...

ATS thread
"Prominent Oil Industry Insider: "Theres Another Leak, Much Bigger, 5 to 6 Miles Away"

Yes shorting allegation sounds possible...especially if this fresh post has anything to it (damage limitation would seem a good idea at this stage to them I'd guess, they may even have the support of the government - shorting - in an attempt to raise funds for compensation...?)


I shorted BP when this first happened. I made about $8,000 in one portfolio and $4,000 in another one. I covered it yesterday, now I'm wishing I held out a little longer.

If a small time trader like me is making some pocket change you can bet the Big Boys are really cleaning up.

[edit on 5/28/2010 by Sparky63]



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 06:54 PM
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I don't know about their claims to have reduced the flow. I am watching the leaks from the kinked riser pipe and it looks a lot like it did 3 days ago, except for the color change.

If this is all mud then that's good, but if they stop pumping mud before they pump in the concrete to form the cap the mud is just going to be expelled at an even faster rate. Have they shown the open end of the riser pipe since they started pumping? I would love to see the color and consistency of the flow coming out the end of the pipe.

Evidently the next step is the junk shots, more pumping, more Junk shots. If all else fails they will go back to the container. If they do that I think it means that they have given up on stopping the leak.



[edit on 5/28/2010 by Sparky63]



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 10:09 PM
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They halted pumping for 16 hours, began a mud/junkshot mix, and are now asking for another 48-hours to 'assess'.

I'm not encouraged.


Failure (Source validity has been questioned... )

[edit on 28-5-2010 by Maxmars]



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
They halted pumping for 16 hours, began a mud/junkshot mix, and are now asking for another 48-hours to 'assess'.

I'm not encouraged.


Failure (Source validity has been questioned... )

[edit on 28-5-2010 by Maxmars]


I doubt that they are even earnestly trying to plug that well. As long as the oil flows they can maintain the claim to the well.

With a moretorium set on future drilling permits, the only way BP can truley ensure they end up with a valid claim to that well, and an operating well is to let the broken well keep flowing until they get a relief well drilled.

I predict that it will take them all of 72 hours once the relief well is in place and operational to cap the damaged one.

Which is about how long it should have taken them to cap the damaged one from the beginning.

The easiest thing for BP to do right now is just put on a show and throw money at the problem.

They have plenty of money to throw at the problem, and the deposit that they have tapped into may be worth trillions.

Do the math.



[edit on 29/5/10 by ProtoplasmicTraveler]



posted on May, 28 2010 @ 11:24 PM
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I don't know if this has been posted yet but there are two industry experts claiming that the massive 20 mile oil plume must be from a different even more massive leak than the one we are all watching.




posted on May, 29 2010 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 





Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler

...the deposit that they have tapped into may be worth trillions.


Yep. Based on my calculations and sources in one of my previous posts, and assuming the price of oil averages $100 a barrel (its currently about $75, but it will obviously continue to go up), the total value of the oil is...

$100 per barrel X 76,650,000,000 gallons / 42 gallons per barrel = $182,500,000,000

Of course, the average price may very end up being more than $100 dollars per barrel. I just picked that number because the math was be easy.



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 07:42 AM
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reply to post by anonymous lurker
 


We are not going to get the truth from BP or the Government on this one. There is to much at stake and too much at play.

The evironmental impact may be staggering on this as time goes on, including eventually leading to a catostrophic loss of human life depending on how toxic the rain becomes as result of all the oil and chemicals now floating in the gulf.

It might take months or even years before the full enviornmental impact can be measured, and in the meantime every politician and oil executive in the land will be looking for ways to cover their behinds and shift blame on to anything that the blame could possibly be shifted on.

I think for those of us who live in the effected area, the smart thing to do is cross our fingers and hope for the best, but to seek out our own independent sources of answers.

I plan to start collecting and testing rain samples periodically and have them tested for toxins by a local chemist here in Miami as the only real means to determine their makeup.

Counting on BP and the U.S. Government to tell us the truth in this case, just might be deadly to us in my humble opinion.

They have every reason in the world to lie to us, and every means to at their disposal to do so.



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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top kill failed
weel it worked and now its still leaking
i call failure not that i expected anything else
good news
holland has ben finally called 4 help clean the oil
6 og our 25 ships will go 2 clean
woopdie doo
we are so #ed



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 01:47 PM
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All the oil from this relief well should be confiscated into perpetuity and diverted towards the restoration of the gulf. Once the gulf has been restored if that can ever happen then the proceeds can go towards some type of oil rig monitoring group who will ensure this never happens again.



posted on May, 29 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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Latest news:
Update on Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill - 29 May BP started the "top kill" operations to stop the flow of oil from the MC252 well in the Gulf of Mexico at 1300 CDT on May 26, 2010. Despite successfully pumping a total of over 30,000 barrels of heavy mud, in three attempts at rates of up to 80 barrels a minute, and deploying a wide range of different bridging materials, the operation did not overcome the flow from the well.

EPIC FAIL! hahaha anyone else see this coming?

SOURCE = Horses Mouth

Release date: 29 May 2010
BP started the "top kill" operations to stop the flow of oil from the MC252 well in the Gulf of Mexico at 1300 CDT on May 26, 2010.

The procedure was intended to stem the flow of oil and gas and ultimately kill the well by injecting heavy drilling fluids through the blow-out preventer on the seabed, down into the well.

Despite successfully pumping a total of over 30,000 barrels of heavy mud, in three attempts at rates of up to 80 barrels a minute, and deploying a wide range of different bridging materials, the operation did not overcome the flow from the well.

The Government, together with BP, have therefore decided to move to the next step in the subsea operations, the deployment of the Lower Marine Riser Package (LMRP) Cap Containment System.
The operational plan first involves cutting and then removing the damaged riser from the top of the failed Blow-Out Preventer (BOP) to leave a cleanly-cut pipe at the top of the BOP’s LMRP. The cap is designed to be connected to a riser from the Discoverer Enterprise drillship and placed over the LMRP with the intention of capturing most of the oil and gas flowing from the well. The LMRP cap is already on site and it is currently anticipated that it will be connected in about four days.

This operation has not been previously carried out in 5,000 feet of water and the successful deployment of the containment system cannot be assured.

Drilling of the first relief well continues and is currently at 12,090 feet. Drilling of the second relief well is temporarily suspended and is expected to recommence shortly from 8,576 feet.

[edit on 29-5-2010 by Majestyka]



posted on Jun, 2 2010 @ 02:16 PM
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It's really sad that this has been going on as long as it has, also that it may be due to money. Also, what the hell are we gonna do about the ocean?? I mean, there's a lot of f**king oil in the water! I know they're cleaning it up, but will they get it all?



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