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The Sky Was Black On The Moon?

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posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:19 AM
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mmm so these highly skilled astronauts couldn't even take the visor off for a second to look at the stars ? ... oh wait ... they did.

But in this case Armstrong wasn't looking at harmless starlight .. he was looking down at the brightly lit moon with it's 'damaging rays'.

www.redicecreations.com...

>>'Armstrong raised his outer visor, the gold reflective visor that normally obscures an astronaut's face,' explained Mr Chaikin.
'Right after he collects the sample, he turns towards the lunar module and it's at that time that time, as he's standing there, that we can see his face inside the helmet. >>


Originally posted by Apex Predator
Also, please remember that the astronauts on the moon were wearing giant visors coated in gold, yes, gold! These visors were made with the intent of filtering out the extreme brightness and damaging rays of direct sunlight that was unfiltered by an atmosphere.

I seriously doubt they took off their helmets just for a bit of stargazing.[edit on 20-4-2010 by Apex Predator]




posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


That's a very interesting article. Thanks for sharing. Here's the news linked in that site News.

I wonder why they didn't release that before?

It seems more and more interesting now.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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Well, if the Apollo 11 crew were all Masons, it sitts in a new light all together, atleast for me, it just goes to show the the Faking could be even more possible as they are, well, not an 'Open' organization..

And I cant figure that on the moon you cant see stars, there is nothing there to create light-pollution to such an extent that all stars all over the moon-sky is blacked out..



(Additionol Info:
Apollo was the son of Zeus, and the Rig Veda said they went to the moon, 6500 years ago..)



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by MR BOB
 


reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


I think what MR BOB may be thinking of is the need for light to bounce off an object in order for that object to be seen. For example, if the light from the light bulb above my head goes straight into my eyes, I can just see light; but the light from the bulb bouncing off my water bottle and then into my eyes allows me to see said water bottle.

Is this along the lines of what you are thinking? Could you be getting this confused with the star-atmosphere thing? In this case, since the stars are the things emitting the light, that light need only go into your eyes for you to see them, not bounce.

Sorry if I'm way off - I'll stay out of it!



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 



Why would you spent your limited time on the moon looking at something you can already see from earth?



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by -PLB-
 


Because you are looking at them from another world. Another world where, in theory, you should be able to see them far clearer. Just a guess...



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by -PLB-
 


They could have played golf all day long at any time on Earth. So why were they playing golf on the moon?



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:49 AM
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So taking time to play golf is more important than looking up to see what the stars look like from another world ?


Originally posted by -PLB-
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 



Why would you spent your limited time on the moon looking at something you can already see from earth?



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:07 AM
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You can't play low gravity golf on earth. And you can see the stars clearly from the spacecraft already. So they had been watching stars in a very clear sky for hours and hours already. I just don't see anything odd about this. If it were a conspiracy they could as well just have said they seen stars. But then I guess the argument would be about how they could ever have seen stars
.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:14 AM
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Similarly, the astronauts eyes are adapted to the daylight scenes around them so they didn't see stars in the sky either. As an experiment to verify this affect, go from a brightly lit room to a dark location just outside and see if you see any stars when you first look up at the sky. Stars were seen, however, when the conditions were right and the crew was dark adapted.


74.125.95.132...:pirlwww.lpl.arizona.edu...

Oh, they did see stars after all. Never mind.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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Wow, so after all, they can see the stars and even captured them with cameras.


Another interesting remark from Edward Lu:
It is fun to watch stars as they rise or set through the atmosphere as we circle the Earth. They start to twinkle as the light rays bend while passing through the uneven density of the atmosphere. Then, as they get closer to the actual horizon, they start to look orange and then red before blinking out. Sometimes they even turn green briefly.

Why didn't any of the 21 Apollo astronauts talk about the stars?

That anonymous person also sent me links to several sites that have photographs taken by the astronauts. The image below is a portion of one of the photos taken by Don Pettit from a window in the space station. Note that stars are everywhere. You can find this and other photos at this NASA page.


Source - www.erichufschmid.net...

[edit on 20-4-2010 by Deaf Alien]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by -PLB-
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 



Why would you spent your limited time on the moon looking at something you can already see from earth?


Just because everything no matter what you do is a first on another world... (moon)...

What you are suggesting is that the stars are so mundane that you wouldn't attempt to see them???

Its human nature to think I wonder what this will be like, when entering a new situation...

So I find it very odd that they didn't think I wonder what the stars will be like from the moon...

I personally think looking up would be one of the first things to do because out there is surely where the next step would be...

Also to look into the abyss.... Ever walked close to the edge of cliff? Have you felt the almost irresistible urge to look over the side??

Looking out into space from the moon would surely draw the same kind of irresistible feeling..??

Korg.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:23 AM
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"Flying the U-2 is real interesting. Unlike flying down lower in the atmosphere like most airplanes, some of the visual sights you see up there are incredible. In daytime, the sky looks a lot different up there. Above all the haze and everything in the atmosphere, the sky is a lot darker, almost purple. It is really an amazing sight. Every once in a while during a mission, you just have to stop and really take a look around and appreciate what you've got up there.

"Night time is a little different also. The air is so much clearer up there; you can see what seems to be 10 times more stars. They just carpet the sky.


www.erichufschmid.net...



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:26 AM
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Ok then ... why did they say this at the press conference then..

www.youtube.com...

Also, apologies deaf alien if this is a little off topic, but what the hell are these 'optics' they talk about in the youtube clip.
Are they referring to the view finder of the camera ? because if that's the case .. oops, they didn't have one. They were chest mounted, fixed hasselblad cameras. Wow, if only I could take such great pics without a viewfinder.


Originally posted by DJW001
Stars were seen, however, when the conditions were right and the crew was dark adapted.




[edit on 20-4-2010 by ppk55]

[edit on 20-4-2010 by ppk55]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien


Wow, so after all, they can see the stars and even captured them with cameras



Woooow
That what I’m talking about... Though surely this camera had a very very long shutter speed.... what a beautiful picture....


Why didn't any of the 21 Apollo astronauts talk about the stars?


Maybe they were brainwashed into believing they went to the moon by the CIA and so their memories have integrated with the pictures...??

Just a thought...

Korg.


[edit on 20-4-2010 by Korg Trinity]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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reply to post by ppk55
 


I wish I could give you more stars but alas I can only give you one big fat star.

It's just not possible that they couldn't see any star.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:36 AM
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Although stars would not normally be visible to the naked eye during daylight, whether from the Earth, the Moon, or on orbit, the planet Venus (which is much brighter than any of the stars) was actually recorded on film by astronaut Alan Shepard at the conclusion of his second extravehicular activity, during the Apollo 14 mission. Shepard was preparing to ascend the ladder to re-enter the lunar module Antares, when he likely noticed Venus shining brightly next to the crescent Earth. He made a series of photographs with his chest-mounted Hasselblad camera, likely all at 1/250th second exposure, and differing f-stops. Owing to its position closer to the Sun and its complete coverage by clouds, Venus has a higher surface brightness than Earth, and is indeed visible to the unaided eye in broad daylight from Earth, given a sufficiently transparent sky. It would have been plainly visible to Shepard in the lunar sky, and easily recorded on film. For a complete explanation, consult the "Images" section of the Apollo 14 Lunar Surface Journal.[5]
In the Apollo 11 press conference, Neil Armstrong states that he was "never able to see stars from the lunar surface or on the daylight side of the moon by eye" [6] Stars were visible with the naked eye only when they were in the shadow of the Moon. All of the landings were in daylight.[7]


en.wikipedia.org...

The astronauts did see stars.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


We don't really know what action they undertook to see the stars. Maybe they tried but didn't get a good view and gave up. Even if they had not tried I would not find it odd. Maybe they were even briefed that the stars would be hard to see because of the bright light.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55
Ok then ... why did they say this at the press conference then..

www.youtube.com...



Originally posted by DJW001
Stars were seen, however, when the conditions were right and the crew was dark adapted.




The way they turned around and looked at each other when the question was raised... it was almost shock that they realised they didn't see any stars....

Body language says it all.... Their reactions don’t add up.

This is not someone remembering what surely would be the most exhilarating experience any human has had the chance to do...

This type of reaction and behaviour is very much like someone in a muddle reciting what was told to them.... They are acting like they are in a daze....

I say they were either hypnotised into believing or totally brainwashed.

Korg.

[edit on 20-4-2010 by Korg Trinity]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 10:42 AM
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Originally posted by Korg Trinity
The fact remains that if the observer on the moon had shielded their vision so that no light from the surface of the moon or any other source could strike the visor and enter their eyes... they would see the stars.


Theoretically, yes, but don't forget how big the helmets were. It would be very hard to block all outside, surrounding light from their eyes. Try holding your hands half a foot away from your face and blocking out light, so you can only see a small amount.






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