The Sky Was Black On The Moon?

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posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


You have caught ONE example, in ONE photo, of a visor being up.

Really, go read about the missions, and the EVAs, from first-hand accounts BY the Astronauts themselves.

Oh, and...NO!

The Human eye does NOT adjust "within a few seconds" from bright light, to dim.

The other way? YES, of course. We go from DARK to bright? The eye adjusts VERY rapidly.

(Try it).

Other way, takes longer. THAT is why we have the term 'night vision' in our lexicon.

Why, oh why do some of us try???

{sigh}
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Originally posted by Bedlam
...all the ones I saw have the orange solar filter down...


Actually, the visor used a gold layer, sandwiched into the visor.

On some EVAs, Astronauts had to raise the visor, because it was scratched (from the grit of Lunar regolith), or because it impeded and deducted from clarity, in darker corners, where things were in shadow...

Also, it altered the perception of color.






[edit on 20 April 2010 by weedwhacker]




posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


Okay you got me on that one. However they had the visors down which is like wearing sunglasses in a bright day time. When you go in a building with sunglasses still on, it won't take long time for your eyes to adjust.

Even so, they should be able to see the brightest stars and planets.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 11:59 AM
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There are no stars in the sky during the day time.

But there are stars in the sky at night time.

That must mean seeing stars has nothing to do with Atmosphere, but in reality has much more to do with Amount of Light Intensity. AKA Light Pollution.

Last time I checked, the Moon landings happened on the Light Side of the moon.

That is why you cannot see stars from the vantage point of standing on the Light side of the Moon. Too much light intensity being reflected off the surface. It drowns out the light from the stars.

However, I BET, on the Dark Side of the moon, you WILL see Stars. Probably the best view ever !



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 




AKA Light Pollution.


Again, there is no light pollution on the moon due to no atmosphere.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Huh?


There are no stars in the sky during the day time.


I believe what you mean, perhaps, is they are 'not visible', during the 'day', because the Sun overpowers, and also because of the scattering effect of the Earth's atmosphere, during the times when the Sun is above the horizon?


At least, I hope that was your point.

Say, for example, you had some means of rising high enough (and, yes, even during the 'day side' on Earth) to escape the atmosphere....you will, I guarantee, see stars.

This topic is well-researched, already. Most who comprehend do NOT question the science, never have.

Anyone with even the slightest bit of photograhic experience will also understand, intuitively.

So....next question??



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


I starred your post.

But...



Say, for example, you had some means of rising high enough (and, yes, even during the 'day side' on Earth) to escape the atmosphere....you will, I guarantee, see stars.


Gotcha!



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


Are you serious? Comparing day and night on earth to the light and dark side of the moon... Ohhhh my gawd. The reason we can't see the flippin' stars during the day is because of our blue ATMOSPHERE. I thought DeafAlien said 50 times by now that the moon doesn't have an atmosphere, therefore surrounding enviromental light has nothing, I repeat, NOTHING to do with whether one could see stars or not, save the fact that their eyes needed time to ajust, as, with no atmosphere, no enviromental light is reflected back at you...

Hitherto, your point is not valid and you stand corrected.

Why do people bother?

Edit: Yet again, seriously? "AKA light pollution"
Did you even read any of the other posts before posting yourself? DeafAlien already explaned light pollution is the result of light saturating the ATMOSPHERE.

There------is-------no-------at-----mo------sphere------on-----the-----moon.

[edit on 20-4-2010 by ParaZep]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 



Again, there is no light pollution on the moon due to no atmosphere.


Actually during Lunar day there is light everywhere, from the reflection of the radiated light from the Sun.

Now I am not saying that there is Rayleigh Scattering, but with the Suns rays, being reflected in exactly the same angle, say about 20-30 degrees as in a normal Lunar stay trip. The entire area the astronauts traversed would have an area above them that was completely washed out due to the reflection of the Light, then being redirected towards space.

The Apollo Astronauts talked about this in many Hasselblad images that had an apparent glow to the surface, due to the extreme amount light present just about the surface, as one would expect from large quantities of Lunar glass reflecting sunlight.

Your standing in a Sun Beam, it will be quite difficult to see the dark!

Space or not!



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


The same reason stars dont show in pictures you are on the suface of the Moon its bathed in bright sunlight the surface is very reflective so your eyes adjust to that light level, think about being on a beach on a bright summers day.
So if they glance up at the sky it would take a few seconds for their eyes to adjust before they would see the stars.

Its really simple!



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


Thanks, 'DA', for the star. Favors returned.

However....not understanding the 'gotcha'?

Let me try, and see if I miss something....On the Moon, sky is 'black', of course, since there really is NO atmosphere of consequence (as compared to what we enjoy here on Earth).

A 'virtual' vacuum, on the Lunar surface. Certainly, not conducive to Human habitation, unless protected in many ways.

The 'sky', as we perceive it, here on Earth, is only 'blue' because of the way that visible (to us) wavelengths of light are scattered by our Nitrogen/Oxygen-predominated atmosphere.

Scientists tell us that some other creatures (bees, for instance) see in other spectra...such as into the UltraViolet, for example.

Imagine the world that they perceive, based on that different spectrum of perception.

THIS is one reason why learning science is so fascinating, and interesting, and WHY I hope many other ATS members delve into it...it is a wonderful realm, and worthy of more exploration......



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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Due to the sheer intensity of the sun, there would have to be a massive reduce in the light being filtered through therefore surely the light from the stars would be faded out.
Otherwise it could just be the astronauts talking about space except for the stars.

Or it could be that they never really visited space.
I really have no idea but I look forward to see where this topic goes.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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#1 the Atmosphere is not blue on Earth.

Oxygen reflects a blue wavelength yes.

And I did mean the reason you cannot see the light during the day on Earth is because of all the Light Reflecting off the Ground (and objects).

Thus why the same effect is on the moon.

Here is a perfect example.

When you are driving at night time, and another car comes past you, your EYES get blinded by the intense light.

And it makes all other lights hard to see. Because those lights are dimmer.

The highest intensity light generally wins and drowns out the other ones.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by weedwhacker
 


The gotcha part is that the astronauts should have been able to see the stars. When you go high enough in altitude on Earth, you should be able to see the stars despite the bright light from the Earth and the sun.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by BlackPoison94
Due to the sheer intensity of the sun, there would have to be a massive reduce in the light being filtered through therefore surely the light from the stars would be faded out.


That is why I think you will see tons of stars on the Dark side of the moon.

That is because there is no massive light intensity from the Sun that will drown them out.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by theability
reply to post by Deaf Alien
 



Again, there is no light pollution on the moon due to no atmosphere.


Actually during Lunar day there is light everywhere, from the reflection of the radiated light from the Sun.

Now I am not saying that there is Rayleigh Scattering, but with the Suns rays, being reflected in exactly the same angle, say about 20-30 degrees as in a normal Lunar stay trip. The entire area the astronauts traversed would have an area above them that was completely washed out due to the reflection of the Light, then being redirected towards space.

The Apollo Astronauts talked about this in many Hasselblad images that had an apparent glow to the surface, due to the extreme amount light present just about the surface, as one would expect from large quantities of Lunar glass reflecting sunlight.

Your standing in a Sun Beam, it will be quite difficult to see the dark!

Space or not!



Finally some answers, even if I am of opposing views. A star for you, my good sir.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by ParaZep

Hitherto, your point is not valid and you stand corrected.


I am sorry you are clearly wrong.

If it was the Atmosphere that caused us not to be able to see stars in the Daytime on Earth, than you are saying there is no Atmosphere at night time?
Since you know, stars are visible at night.

I am showing how your logic is flawed.

Atmosphere is present during NIGHT AND DAY, but stars are only visible during ONE of those two periods!!

Therefore, Atmosphere is NOT a viable factor in whether or not a star is visible in the sky or not.

It is a MINOR FACTOR, and in the situation of the Moon and Earth, it is a Negligible factor.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:38 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 




And I did mean the reason you cannot see the light during the day on Earth is because of all the Light Reflecting off the Ground (and objects).


On Earth, those lights reflect BACK to you from the atmosphere.

On the moon, those light rays reflect into the space.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 




On Earth, those lights reflect BACK to you from the atmosphere.
On the moon, those light rays reflect into the space.


The issue, that no matter what the light is experiencing, it is still LIGHT!

No matter what it is going through on the lunar surface, Light will over power the Astronauts ability to see DARK.

You have light approaching the surface...

You have light reflecting off the surface...

You have light, being redirected out into space, leaving the surface...

Therefore light is everywhere, during Lunar stay.

This is what light does, brightens things up!




posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:44 PM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 




Therefore, Atmosphere is NOT a viable factor in whether or not a star is visible in the sky or not.


I guess you have not heard of the Rayleigh scattering among other things?



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


But....if you had the opportunity (and the Shuttle Discovery just landed, today, after a mission to the Space Station...the ISS.

YOU could ask someone who has ACTUALLY been there?

I suggest a further reading of personal accounts, by actual Astronauts.

Hopefully their words, as related and provided, will help to understand. After all, we can live vicariously through others' words.

EVEN IF, we are unable to personally follow in their footsteps,

I doubt many who read this, here on ATS, have actually climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro. HOWEVER, I'd think that any blog, or personal diary of a person's who actually HAS climbed that mountain would be interesteing to read, for those of us who haven't accomplished it.

This is little different, WHEN you read personal recollections of Astronauts, about their actual experiences....





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