The Sky Was Black On The Moon?

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posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by Deaf Alien

Originally posted by jazz10
you wont see stars because they erase them, probably due to not been able to determine stars or ufo`s or possibly they dont want us to see the rubbish and space junk thats up there courtesy of humans.


Well yeah. But this is not the photos.

This is the astronauts themselves stating that the sky was "pitch black". They only could see the sun and the earth.

How is that even possible?


I would like to stick my orr in here.

You are actually 100% correct. Even with the brightness of the sun on the surface of the moon, the stars should be visible to an observer.

It is true that photographs may not be able to take images of the surface of the moon and the sky and pick up stars... this is due to the filters needed to reduce washout.

However....

If a photograph should be taken of the sky with the sun at the photographers back and the camera pointed at the sky so no ground was visible then indeed it would have been possible to take images of the stars...

Following this train of thought and it is logical to state that if an observer were to do the same thier eyes would be able to see stars very clearly.

My personal view is that the Apollo astronaughts were among the first to be successfully brainwashed and hypnotised into believing the story they were told about being on the moon.

Whether we did or we didn't go to the moon is a debate that is endless; however it is very clear to me at least that the Apollo missions were faked.

All the best,

Korg.




posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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Exactly! If they had time to bounce around and sing songs, and have a jolly good time up there, I simply can't believe these highly skilled astronauts didn't spend 1 minute to look up, then block out the sun or the earth with their hands and look at the stars.

Wouldn't that have been a life long dream ... to see the stars from another world ? A dream that probably started when they first looked up at the stars and that started their obsession with space travel.

I think it's extremely strange.


Originally posted by Deaf Alien
Then block out the light from the moon with your hands? We all have put up our hands up to our eyes to block out the light from the surrounding.

There is a reason for shields on telescopes.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:35 AM
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Seriously this again. It's the same reason you can't take photos of stars during daytime. You must realize that they were in daylight. If you think it's so simple as to keep your camera on the shadow then feel free to go outside and take pictures of stars during daytime. You can see stars on earth during daytime but you will need to be in a well or some such thing.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by MR BOB
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


If im wrong im wrong why should I be embaressed. we cant all be experts at everything.

please explain to me in detail why i am wrong.

i would like to be corrected.


[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]


You are wrong because light as any other form of electromagnetic waves do not require a medium to travel.

Light is not kinetic like sound and does not require a medium to travel through.

And you should be embarrased because this knowledge is so basic that even a child should know.

If what you suggest was correct then how you do think the light would travel from the stars in the first place, did you think inter galactic space has an atmosphere????

The reason you or anyone else can see the stars is the photons that left the stars millions of years ago reached you and entered your iris to be picked up by your retina and then interpreted by your visual cortex as an image....

Korg.


[edit on 20-4-2010 by Korg Trinity]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:38 AM
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It seems to me this is simply a matter of interest. When you are on the moon, you are not going to look at the sky or take pictures of the sky. You can do that from a spacecraft as well. It can take several minutes for your eyes to adjust, and there isn't a reason why you would want to do this. As far as I know there are no pictures taken without any bright area in it. But if there are you should be able to see the stars in it.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:41 AM
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If you'd taken the time to read the OP you would realise this has nothing to do with photography... it's about how the astronauts commented how they themselves, with their OWN eyes could not see any stars.


Originally posted by PsykoOps
Seriously this again. It's the same reason you can't take photos of stars during daytime. You must realize that they were in daylight. If you think it's so simple as to keep your camera on the shadow then feel free to go outside and take pictures of stars during daytime. You can see stars on earth during daytime but you will need to be in a well or some such thing.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:43 AM
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Yeah I read it, and I said that it's the same reason as with the photographs. Eyes and photography work the same way in this matter.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:43 AM
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Originally posted by ppk55
Exactly! If they had time to bounce around and sing songs, and have a jolly good time up there, I simply can't believe these highly skilled astronauts didn't spend 1 minute to look up, then block out the sun or the earth with their hands and look at the stars.

Wouldn't that have been a life long dream ... to see the stars from another world ? A dream that probably started when they first looked up at the stars and that started their obsession with space travel.

I think it's extremely strange.


Originally posted by Deaf Alien
Then block out the light from the moon with your hands? We all have put up our hands up to our eyes to block out the light from the surrounding.

There is a reason for shields on telescopes.


Ooooh thanks so much for that post!!!!

That's precisely what I mean!!!

The astronauts should be able to see some of the brightest stars (if not less bright) even when they viewed the Earth.

A big star for your post!



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:44 AM
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reply to post by PsykoOps
 




Seriously this again. It's the same reason you can't take photos of stars during daytime. You must realize that they were in daylight. If you think it's so simple as to keep your camera on the shadow then feel free to go outside and take pictures of stars during daytime. You can see stars on earth during daytime but you will need to be in a well or some such thing.


A daylight on moon is the same as a daylight on Earth?



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:45 AM
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Originally posted by PsykoOps
Seriously this again. It's the same reason you can't take photos of stars during daytime. You must realize that they were in daylight. If you think it's so simple as to keep your camera on the shadow then feel free to go outside and take pictures of stars during daytime. You can see stars on earth during daytime but you will need to be in a well or some such thing.


Although you are right about not being able to take images of the stars through a daylight atmosphere... the moon has such a slight atmosphere it would make zero difference.

The reason you cannot see the stars in the daylight on earth is that the sun refracts through the particles in the atmosphere, this wash of light is far brighter than the star light and so you don't see the stars...

But on the moon??

If an observer were to look with their back against the sun and look up, so that there was nothing in view except the stars, they would see the light from the stars. This is because the sun does not refract from the atmosphere at anywhere near the level it does on earth.

If the earth had no atmosphere... you would also be able to see the stars if you were to look away from the sun... Of course we would all be dead but that's a moot point


All the best,

Korg.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:49 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


is that how you interpreted what i said?

no no no. that's not what I had written.

yes i know light travels on its own.

but you cant see it unless it bounces off something./hits something



Like how you can see the blackness next to the sun, instead of just seeing light. rays going side ways.

this light is travelling thousands of miles. but it will not illuminate everything.

im not sure if im making myself clear still.

[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:54 AM
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Maybe the reflection of the Sun shinning on our bright white Moon blinds the astronauts on the surface, a natural form of light pollution.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:55 AM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


Yeah pretty much. The athmosphere makes pretty much no difference.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by MR BOB
reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


is that how you interpreted what i said?

no no no. that's not what I had written.

yes i know light travels on its own.

but you cant see it unless it bounces off something./hits something



Like how you can see the blackness next to the sun, instead of just seeing light. rays going side ways.

this light is travelling thousands of miles. but it will not illuminate everything.

im not sure if im making myself clear still.

[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]


Hmmmm I think your stretching...

The light actually goes in through your iris and it hits your retina... This is how we See...

There is no illumination in the image around the sun because the light source is the sun and you are seeing that... If there were an object over there in the blackness you can see that object because the sun has illuminated it... the light has bounced off the surface of the object to reach your iris....

Can you see where you are going wrong?

Incidentally there is a big rush on at the moment to create the blackest black... you see true black can absorb the energy of light as apposed to reflecting it...

If we can create a truly black black then we will have far greater potential to convert light into direct energy...

Peace Out,

Korg.


[edit on 20-4-2010 by Korg Trinity]


+8 more 
posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 08:57 AM
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Daylight on the Moon is much brighter than daylight on Earth precisely because of the fact that there is minimal atmosphere on the moon. The rays of the Sun are not filtered and reflect back from the lunar surface without losing much intensity. Therefore, even if your back were to the Sun you would still be getting probably the same amount of light in your eyes as if you were walking through Oklahoma during the day on Earth. That is why even when the astronauts were standing in the shadow of the lunar module you could still see them perfectly lit in the pictures.

Also, please remember that the astronauts on the moon were wearing giant visors coated in gold, yes, gold! These visors were made with the intent of filtering out the extreme brightness and damaging rays of direct sunlight that was unfiltered by an atmosphere. If it can block the Sun I'm sure the infinitesimal (by comparison) light given off by stars "filtered" through billions of miles of space (which is not empty by the way) would be blocked out also. Maybe that had something to do with not being able to see stars on the moon regardless of the direction they faced. I seriously doubt they took off their helmets just for a bit of stargazing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that it was probably a combination of 60's era technology and millenia old biology. Visors filtered a lot of available light and the Human eye can only withstand a certain brightness without experiencing a "washout", like walking into a dark room after being outside, in July, at noon, without cheap sunshades (or black sunglasses). Sorry about the ZZ Top reference, I couldn't help myself!



-- Apex

Edited to correct spelling errors

[edit on 20-4-2010 by Apex Predator]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:02 AM
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Bright light causes the pupils to contract nearly instantaneously, to shield shield the eye. It takes much longer for them to dilate again. In other words, the brightness of the landscape causes the iris to contract, cutting down the eyes' sensitivity to light. The stars are too dim to be seen in "full daylight" mode. It would probably take a few minutes standing in the shade before the eyes could adapt sufficiently to see the stars, and they were too busy performing experiments and playing golf to waste their time.

[edit on 20-4-2010 by DJW001]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by Korg Trinity
 


"The light actually goes in through your iris and it hits your retina... This is how we See... "

I already knew this, didn't think I needed 2 bring it up.

"If there were an object over there in the blackness you can see that object because the sun has illuminated it... the light has bounced of the surface of the object to reach your iris...."

thats what i was trying to say.

im awful at explaining things. i know what i mean in my mind, it seems to make sense when i type it lol.

I was trying to say in my OP, that the distant starlight is reflected in our atmosphere, to help see the stars better.

So i thought, no atmosphere= no stars light. (execpt our suns, bouncing off the moons surface)

But what is there for the distant starlight to bounce off on the moon to our eyes? the surface?
i though our eyes would not be enough to pick em up without atmosphere.








[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]

[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]

[edit on 20-4-2010 by MR BOB]



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:09 AM
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Something else to ponder over.

The planets are very bright compared to the stars.

None of the astronauts on any apollo missions to the moon ever commented on seeing the planets as far as I know.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by Deaf Alien
 


They could see the Earth, the nearest planet. Theoretically, they could probably see the planets if they shaded their eyes from the glare and knew where to look. Pity that apparently none of them thought to do this.



posted on Apr, 20 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by Apex Predator
Also, please remember that the astronauts on the moon were wearing giant visors coated in gold, yes, gold!


Actually from a science point of view this makes some sense. If the visor itself was reflecting light / filtering light levels down to a point where stars would not be visible then this could explain it...

It would be a bit like going out at night to look at the stars with a pair of sunglasses while someone shines a torch in your face...


However....

The fact remains that if the observer on the moon had shielded their vision so that no light from the surface of the moon or any other source could strike the visor and enter their eyes... they would see the stars.

The fact that they didn't attempt to do this is very telling... Who wouldn't want to look at the stars from the moon?? If it was me up there It would be one of the first things I would try and do.

And to those that say that an atmosphere makes no difference to daylight...
Geeze man do they even still teach physics are school these days??


All the best,

Korg.


[edit on 20-4-2010 by Korg Trinity]





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