It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Eyjafjallajökull Caldera Eruption

page: 80
91
<< 77  78  79    81  82  83 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 03:07 PM
link   
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


Appears to me the area in question is the same as it has been. Check page 47 of this thread.




posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by jazz10
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


Looks that way. How can we get previous dated pics incase im way off here. Im sure there were small streams of water from the ice running across the whole base, now seems to be well,dry?

I can get you some previous dated pics, though not of the thermal cam, I'll post em tomorrow for comparison - I have many



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 07:33 PM
link   
The poro' thermal cam is still showing alot of heat along the front of eyja'. Does this mean we have lava moving up to the surface here?. I feel like im asking stupid questions but dont recall seeing it this 'hot' here.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 08:30 PM
link   


Update on activity
Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland Assessment
7 June 2010 14:40

Some eruptive activity is still in the western side of the crater. Magma explosions occur off and on producing ash, which falls near the crater. This explosive activity is accompanied by an abrupt increase in tremor.

White steam clouds have reached a height of 6 km following these explosions.

We continue to monitor the volcano closely.

In the western part of the crater, a new crater has formed at the site of explosive activity.

Tremor pulses late 6 June accompanied steam plumes from this new crater. The plumes and explosions are small. Caving in of lava in the conduit can be heard between explosions.

Only a part of the new active crater has been seen due to the steam.

The glacial ice at the top is advancing rapidly to the Gígjökull outlet glacier.

In the afternoon of 4 June an increase in seismic tremor was recorded at seismic stations around the volcano, but decreased again in the evening.

Small pulses of tremor were recorded off and on during the night. At around 0900h on 5 June the tremor reached a maximum before decreasing again. An increase was recorded late 6 June for a short time and small pulses were recorded last night. The tremor has been predominantly at high frequencies.

A few small, shallow earthquakes have been recorded beneath the top crater in the last few days.


en.vedur.is...



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 10:03 PM
link   
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


I see what you mean... some constant steam plumes on the glacier again, too.



posted on Jun, 10 2010 @ 02:54 AM
link   
Can't see much on the poro cam. Pity vodaphone still not working. I don't think it's ground deformation or anything unusual you guys and girls saw.

On the other hand we are having a small increase in tremor activity since Midnight (10-06-2010). Especially on low frequency (red line 05.-1) and not related to any small earthquakes.

hraun.vedur.is...

Sit, watch and wait I would say, and let us hope the sky is going to clear up above Iceland soon.



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 01:24 AM
link   
Goodmorning to you all, i have the official report from 10 june:

Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull - Status Report: 15:00 GMT, 10 June 2010
Icelandic Meteorological Office and Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Compiled by: Sigurlaug Hjaltadóttir, Sigrún Hreinsdóttir, Hrafn Guðmundsson, Bergthóra S. Thorbjarnardóttir, and Martin Hensch.

Based on: IMO seismic monitoring; IES-IMO GPS monitoring; IMO hydrological data; web cameras, lightning detection system, web-based ash reports from the public and research expedition of the IES to the summit on 3/6-2010.

Eruption plume:
Height (a.s.l.): No information
Heading: SW-wind today, turning towards NW-wind tonight.
Colour: White (when last seen late on 7-8 June).
Tephra fallout: No informaiton
Lightning: None were measured on the UK Met Office's system but 32 lightnings were measured on the New Mexico network on the 7 June.
Noises: Rumbling was heard at Gígjökull yesterday at around 15:00h just before a steam cloud rose from the crater.

Meltwater: Low discharge from Gígjökull.

Conditions at eruption site: The eruption site has not been visible today. White steam clouds were observed on a web-camera from Thórólfsfell on Monday evening, 7 May.

Seismic tremor: A slight increase was observed on Monday evening in the frequency range 1-2 Hz. The increase in the 0,5-1 Hz range today is probably due the weather.

Earthquakes: A few small, shallow earthquakes have been recorded beneath the top crater in the last few days.

GPS deformation: Slow and continuous deformation towards the volcano in the last two weeks.

Overall assessment: A small increase in tremor was observed on Monday evening and higher steam clouds were seen at the same time on a web-camera. The clouds were white and contained little or no ash. We continue to monitor the volcano closely.

www2.norvol.hi.is...



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 01:28 AM
link   
Hello again, i found something from a neighbour volcano from Eyjafjallajökull, the name is Askja and is 180 north from Eyjafjallajökull.

A volcano expert warned yesterday that another Icelandic eruption could be imminent, raising the prospect of summer holiday flight chaos. Dr Hazel Rymer has been monitoring a volcano called Askja 180 miles north of Eyjafjallajokull – the volcano that caused a complete shutdown of most of Europe’s airspace in April. She says it is showing increasing signs of seismic activity. Her team from the Open University in London and volunteers from environmental charity Earthwatch have noticed changes in the “plumbing system” beneath the mountain. Dr Rymer said: “New magma is accumulating. This is what happens before an eruption, but a critical amount needs to accumulate and we cannot say what that is. We can’t predict when an eruption will occur – it could be next week or next year.” Askja, which is on the same tectonic plate as Eyjafjallajokull, last erupted in 1961. For the past few centuries it has erupted every 40 years or so. In 1875 Askja had a major eruption causing a crater three miles wide and sending ash as far as Scotland and Scandinavia. Dr Rymer doesn’t think the recent Eyjafjallajokull eruptions could be causing activity at Askja. European airspace was closed from April 15 to 20, grounding about 10 million travellers and costing the airline industry an estimated £1.2billion

hisz.rsoe.hu...

You never now what happens these days???


Some info about Askja volcano

Volcano type Stratovolcano

Location Northeastern Iceland, 65.03°N / 16.75°W

Summit elevation 1516 m (4,974 ft)

Last eruptions 1797(?), 1875, 1919, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924(?), 1926, 1938, 1961

Typical eruption style Explosive + effusive.



Askja is a large basaltic central volcano that forms the Dyngjufjöll massif. It is truncated by three overlapping calderas, the largest of which is 8 km wide and may have been produced primarily from subglacial ring-fracture eruptions rather than by subsidence. A major rhyolitic explosive eruption from Dyngjufjöll about 10,000 years ago was in part associated with the formation of Askja caldera. Many postglacial eruptions also occurred along the ring-fracture. A major explosive eruption on the SE caldera margin in 1875 was one of Iceland's largest during historical time. It resulted in the formation of a smaller 4.5-km-wide caldera, now filled by Öskjuvatn lake, that truncates the rim of the larger central caldera. The 100-km-long Askja fissure swarm, which includes the Sveinagja graben, is also related to the Askja volcanic system, as are several small shield volcanoes such as Kollatadyngja. Twentieth-century eruptions at Askja have produced lava flows from vents located mostly near Öskjuvatn lake.

www.volcanodiscovery.com...

[edit on 11-6-2010 by ni91ck]



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 04:43 AM
link   
reply to post by ni91ck
 


Good Morning ni91ck,

Nicely precented post there (yours always are)
and an interesting little tidbit ... one to watch maybe.


I still take a daily look or two at the 'poro cam' and it looks like a nice blue skied day today


Woody



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 05:44 AM
link   
reply to post by woodwytch
 


Thx Woody, yes i watch a few times a day. And search always for some news. She is very easy the last days but still a beauty to watch!!!



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 10:59 AM
link   
Quick. Someone catch an image of the Poro cam right now. There is a steam vent opening up on the floor below the glacier. It's clearly visible. I'd do it but I'm not techno-savy.



posted on Jun, 11 2010 @ 10:59 AM
link   
Ignore!! Double post. Told ya.

[edit on 11-6-2010 by Robin Marks]



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 01:37 AM
link   
A lake has formed in the crater - 11 June 2010 19:00

It's very cool.



en.vedur.is...

[edit on 12-6-2010 by berkeleygal]



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 09:39 AM
link   

Originally posted by berkeleygal
A lake has formed in the crater - 11 June 2010 19:00

It's very cool.



en.vedur.is...

[edit on 12-6-2010 by berkeleygal]



That is so beautiful ... nature is such a wonderful artist ... amazing thank-you so much for sharing that.


Woody



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 11:10 AM
link   
reply to post by berkeleygal
 


It is probably quite warm actually


Latest Status report PDF



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 11:27 AM
link   
We may need a new thread soon. For Katya. Earthquake activity seems to be on the rise ....

en.vedur.is...



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 04:02 PM
link   
reply to post by Essan
 


new moon today... whole world is shacking...l-)



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 04:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by Essan
We may need a new thread soon. For Katya. Earthquake activity seems to be on the rise ....

en.vedur.is...


Already one here www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:21 PM
link   
Ladies and gentlemen, Here is the oficial report from 11 june.

Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull - Status Report: 23:00 GMT, 11 June 2010
Icelandic Meteorological Office and Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Compiled by: Sigurlaug Hjaltadóttir, Magnús Tumi Guðumundsson, Jón Kristinn Helgason, Sigrún Hreinsdóttir, Bergthóra S. Thorbjarnardóttir.

Based on: IMO seismic monitoring; IES-IMO GPS monitoring; IMO hydrological data; web cameras, lightning detection system and overflights at 8 and 21 on 11 June.

Eruption plume:
Height (a.s.l.): Mostly within the crater, every now and then the steam clouds rise above the crater rim.
Heading:
Colour: White.
Tephra fallout: None.
Lightning: None were measured on the UK Met Office's system.
Noises: No reports

Meltwater:
Low discharge from Gígjökull.

Mudflood:
Heavy rainfall during the night before last and early yesterday morning caused considerable swelling in Svaðbælisá River. The water contained a great amount of mud, that flowed over fields despite the levee that was erected to protect the farming land at Thorvaldseyri. Considerable mud has accumulated in the river channel since the eruption began, decreasing the depth of the channel. This has caused water to flow up onto a road west of a bridge, as there it now not much difference between the height of the bridge and the river channel.

Conditions at eruption site:
A lake, about 300 m in diamenter, has formed at the bottom of the big crater. Steam is rising from the rims, especially from the north side. In the morning the steam cloud only rose about 100 m over the crater but reached 500-1000 m in the evening. On the western side of the crater, above the water surface, a brown-colored cloud can be seen rising from two small openings. Mounds of sulphur have formed by steam eyes in the lava rein, just north of the crater.

Seismic tremor:
Low tremor level. No pulses have been observed for the last 24 hours.

Earthquakes:
A few small, shallow earthquakes have been recorded beneath the summit in the last few days.

GPS deformation:
Slow and continuous deformation towards the volcano in the last two weeks.

Overall assessment:
No magma is being erupted at present with activity being confined to steaming. Water has stated to accumulate in the main crater and poses a threat of drainage in a flood down Gígjökull in the coming weeks.

www2.norvol.hi.is...



posted on Jun, 12 2010 @ 08:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by Essan
We may need a new thread soon. For Katya. Earthquake activity seems to be on the rise ....

en.vedur.is...




Holy crap! I wasn't expecting to see that many quakes under Katla. wow. I'm a bit worried. Air travel will soon be stopped again.

I've checked that map for Months now, and have never seen that much seismic activity under the big K.. Calm down, K... come on... take a very large valium sweety.



new topics

top topics



 
91
<< 77  78  79    81  82  83 >>

log in

join