It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Eyjafjallajökull Caldera Eruption

page: 79
91
<< 76  77  78    80  81  82 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 06:01 AM
link   
reply to post by ni91ck
 


Unbelievable! They have piles of ash and the want to move it at a profit!!

Enterprising I suppose, but really!




posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 06:05 AM
link   
reply to post by Nidwin
 


Well said Sir. Very nicely put. Resting yes. Sleeping - probably not.

Very nicely put. Well said Sir. (well I didn't think line 2 was really needed)



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 05:02 PM
link   
And one's more the official report:

Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull - Status Report: 15:00 GMT, 1 June 2010
Icelandic Meteorological Office and Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Compiled by: Gunnar B. Guðmundsson, Helga Ívarsdóttir, Sibylle von Löwis and Sigrún Hreinsdóttir

Based on: IMO seismic monitoring; IES-IMO GPS monitoring; IMO hydrological data; web cameras, ATDnet – UK Met. Offices lightning detection system, webbased ash reports from the public and scientists that went to the volcano.

Eruption plume:
Height (a.s.l.): Clouds and mist have covered the summit of the volcano both yesterday and today. At 08:00 GMT today a white cloud was seen at 2 km a.s.l. on web-cameras. Winds of up to 10 m/s are blowing from the east.
Tephra fallout: Widespread drifting of existing ash in southwest Iceland, both yesterday and today. High concentration of airborne dust in Reykjavík yesterday at noon and again at midnight.
Lightning: No lightning strikes have been detected.
Noises: No reports.

Meltwater: Low discharge from Gígjökull.

Seismic tremor: Volcanic tremor is still more than before the eruption and has been rather steady since 22nd May, but small pulses, mostly on the lowest frequency are being detected on the seismic stations around the volcano.

Earthquakes: Daily, there are several small and shallow earthquakes under the volcano.

GPS deformation: No significant deformation at sites around Eyjafjallajökull.

Overall assessment: There is still a considerable amount of steam coming from the crater. The tremor is still higher than before the onset of the eruption, and small tremor pulses have been detected on the lowest frequency. We continue to monitor the volcano closely.

www2.norvol.hi.is...



posted on Jun, 1 2010 @ 10:20 PM
link   


She's blowing off a lot of steam today.




you can see the moon


[edit on 1-6-2010 by berkeleygal]



posted on Jun, 2 2010 @ 01:37 AM
link   
Profit :-)

Why not, business is business after all. It also looks pretty.

The only disturbing thing for me is the nature of what they are selling. If it realy is volcanic ash, they should add a paper, explaining the dangers of volcanic ash. It's not sand or ash from burned wood.
Children should not play with this and if something happens and that glass breaks people should know what and what not to do.
My opinion of course.

Nid



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 03:50 AM
link   
All eyes on Lady Eyja again... there has been increased tremor activity and a slightly meatier plume in last few hours. Certainly worth keeping an eye on it to see if it's new activity or her death throes.



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 07:52 AM
link   
Yes i still doing it. I have the feeling that this is not the end? But here is the official report:

Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull
Status Report: 12:00 GMT, 4 June 2010
Icelandic Meteorological Office and Institute of Earth Sciences, University
of Iceland
Compiled by: Gunnar B. Guðmundsson, Teitur Arason, Hrafn Guðmundsson, Ármann
Höskuldsson and Sigrún Hreinsdóttir
Based on: IMO seismic monitoring; IES-IMO GPS monitoring; IMO hydrological data;
web cameras, ATDnet – UK Met. Offices lightning detection system, webbased
ash reports from the public and research expedition of the IES to the
summit on 3/6-2010.
Eruption plume:
Height (a.s.l.): Clouds and mist have covered the summit of the volcano both
yesterday and today. On Wednesday 2nd June a white steam cloud was
seen up to 2.5 km a.s.l. On Thursday 3rd of June scientist from IES
came to the crater area. In the main crater steaming is still active.
However, intensity of the steam is considerable smaller than it was last
week. Steam rises some 200 to 400 m above crater rim. South of the
volcano winds 8-13 m/s are blowing from the east today.
Heading: N/A
Colour: N/A
Tephra fallout: Widespread drifting of existing ash in south- and southwest Iceland,
both yesterday and today.
Lightning: No lightning strikes have been detected.
Noises: In the crater area solfatara is steaming out with a noise like that from a
hight temperature geothermal drill hole.
Meltwater: Low discharge from Gígjökull.
Conditions at eruption site: N/A
Seismic tremor: Volcanic tremor is still more than before the eruption and has been
rather steady since 22nd May, but small pulses, mostly on the lowest
frequency are being detected on the seismic stations around the
volcano.
Earthquakes: Daily, there are several small and shallow earthquakes under the
volcano.
GPS deformation: No significant deformation at sites around Eyjafjallajökull.
Overall assessment: Steaming activity in the main crater has diminished since last week.
Though there is still a considerable amount of steam coming from the
crater. Widespread drifting of existing ash in south- and southwest
Iceland. The tremor is still higher than before the onset of the eruption,
and small tremor pulses have been detected on the lowest frequency.
We continue to monitor the volcano closely.

www2.hi.is...



posted on Jun, 5 2010 @ 06:37 PM
link   


Just checked the poro' cam for first time in a few days and im in agreement with others here, i dont think this is over yet.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 07:33 AM
link   
Hello everyone.
I might be mistaken, but looking at the Poro webcam it seems that the streams have been filled with hot water. There is vapor rising from different places in the stream.
If it's only clouds, my apologies, but the discharge from the glacier seems to have increased anyway.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 10:14 AM
link   
reply to post by hico
 


If you are talking about the low visibility on cams at the time of this post, then yes, its clouds.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 12:07 PM
link   
Katla rumbled today.

For real

en.vedur.is...

[edit on 7-6-2010 by Mr Zeropoint]



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 12:07 PM
link   
wats going on last days... seems an greater seismic period at the iceland volkano's...

en.vedur.is...



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 03:25 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mr Zeropoint
Katla rumbled today.

For real

en.vedur.is...

[edit on 7-6-2010 by Mr Zeropoint]


For real
Ha Ha, point taken!!

Interesting pattern round the other side of the caldera though. All very small however. The lift, albeit slight, on the HVO monitor does not seem to tie in with the quake so since this was in the 0.5-1.0 Hz band this is probably magma movement. HVO being SW of Katla I am not sure where this would be coming from. Of course it is possible that it is something else local to the unit.



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 06:02 PM
link   
hello there again, and i mean AGAIN.Eyjafjallajökull is coming slowly back to life. I don't say fast, but slowley! No reason to panic. Here is the official report from 7 june. Maybe whe meet again here? :

Eruption in Eyjafjallajökull - Status Report: 11:00 GMT, 7 June 2010
Icelandic Meteorological Office and Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland

Compiled by: Gunnar B. Guðmundsson, Sigurlaug Hjaltadóttir, Ármann Höskuldsson, Björn Sævar Einarsson, Haraldur Eiríksson, Þorvaldur Þórðarsson, Guðrún Larsen, Sigrún Hreinsdóttir and Bergthóra S. Thorbjarnardóttir.

Based on: IMO seismic monitoring; IES-IMO GPS monitoring; IMO hydrological data; web cameras, lightning detection system, web-based ash reports from the public and research expedition of the IES to the summit on 3/6-2010.

Eruption plume:
Height (a.s.l.): On 4 June at 1950h the plume was at a height of 4.5 km. Last night a plume of steam was observed from a plane at a height of 4.5 - 6 km. This morning a steam plume was observed for a short period at a height of 3 km.
Heading: to the southwest on 4 and 5 June. Yesterday and this morning to the south.
Colour: Mostly white at the top and grayish and dark at the bottom following explosive activity.
Tephra fallout: Off and on near the crater. Considerable ash drift on 4 June.
Lightning: An eyewitness at Ásólfsskálaheiði (9 km SW of crater) observed two small flashes of lightning in the evening of 4 June. Four lightning flashes were recorded yesterday morning, 6 June.
Noises: Considerable rumbling was heard at Raufarfell (10 km south of the crater) in the afternoon of 4 June.

Meltwater: Low discharge from Gígjökull.

Conditions at eruption site: Considerable steam emanates from the big crater and has increased since 3 June. In the western part of the crater, a new crater has formed at the site of explosive activity. Tremor pulses late 6 June accompanied steam plumes from this new crater. The plumes and
explosions are small. Caving in of lava in the conduit can be heard between explosions. Only a part of the new active crater has been seen due to the steam. The glacial ice at the top is advancing rapidly to the Gígjökull otulet glacier.

Seismic tremor: In the afternoon of 4 June an increase in tremor was recorded at seismic stations around the volcano, but decreased again in the evening. Small pulses of tremor were recorded off and on during the night. At around 0900h on 5 June the tremor reached a maximum before decreasing again. An increase was recorded late 6 June for a short time and small pulses were recorded last night. The tremor has been predominantly at high frequencies.

Earthquakes: A few small, shallow earthquakes have been recorded beneath the top crater in the last few days.

GPS deformation: No significant deformation at sites around Eyjafjallajökull.

Overall assessment: Some eruptive activity is still in the western side of the crater. Magma explosions occur off and on producing ash, which falls near the crater. This explosive activity is accompanied by an abrupt increase in tremor. White steam clouds have reached a height of 6 km following these explosions. We continue to monitor the volcano closely.

www2.norvol.hi.is...



posted on Jun, 7 2010 @ 06:12 PM
link   
Increased volcanic activity at Eyjafjallajokull

Posted on05 June 2010. Tags: Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland, volcano
The now-dormant volcano under South Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull glacier is showing signs of increased activity; but there is no indication the eruption is starting up again.The increased activity began yesterday afternoon and has been sporadic since, RUV reports. Fluctuations in volcanic intensity are normal after a recent eruption.

Volcanoes show signs of activity as they move and settle down and the ongoing energy spikes do not automatically mean that the volcano is starting up again – although it clearly could, says Icelandic Met Office geophysicist Gunnar Gudmundsson.

www.icenews.is...-15463

Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption still not quite over

Posted on07 June 2010. Tags: Eyjafjallajokull, Iceland, volcano

The activity under Eyjafjallajokull which began on Thursday is probably a sign that a small eruption has been taking place at the volcano, experts say.
The measured activity was highest on Saturday, almost stopped yesterday morning and started up again yesterday afternoon. The volcanic activity slowed again at around 02.00 and remains low

Gunnar B. Gudmundsson, geophysicist at the Icelandic Met Office, says that it appears that a small volcanic eruption probably began on Thursday with a small amount of lava and ash production. Gudmundsson says that the earthquakes being measured on-site are very shallow, indicating a very small eruption – although the eruption’s existence has not been confirmed visually as steam production at Eyjafjallajokull never stopped, thereby making visibility difficult.

The current level of activity is expected to continue in the short term.

www.icenews.is...



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:04 PM
link   
Ok, so i was looking at the poro' cam yet again today and things look a little different i think, i could be wrong but in front of where the eruption was (where the glacier meltwater ran) it looks like there maybe a bit of ground deformation.



And the thermal image seems to show a lot of heat in this area



Maybe im just reading it wrong, a second opinion would be much appreciated.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


You are definately right
on earlier posts i had mentioned where the ice was melting those were NOT there.



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 01:37 PM
link   
reply to post by jazz10
 


So maybe, just maybe we will see these 'venting' soon.




posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 02:02 PM
link   
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


Looks that way. How can we get previous dated pics incase im way off here. Im sure there were small streams of water from the ice running across the whole base, now seems to be well,dry?



posted on Jun, 9 2010 @ 03:00 PM
link   
reply to post by jazz10
 

Theres quite a few within this thread but the camera angles have changed slightly. Ill be keeping a closer eye on this anyway.



new topics

top topics



 
91
<< 76  77  78    80  81  82 >>

log in

join