Airport Full Body Scanners destroy DNA

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posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 11:14 PM
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You could post the abstracts.

What would also be helpful are some numbers. You can post numbers from documents etc research.

[edit on 1-1-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]




posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
You could post the abstracts.

What would also be helpful are some numbers. You can post numbers from documents etc research.


OK.....

Let me see what I can do.

Cheers again
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 11:43 PM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 

G'day again IgnoranceIsntBlisss

I'll post a few of the abstracts, one at a time.

I won't provide the links where they show my daughter's name & subscription details.

By the way, my daughter is now calling these "terror hertz"....

Her "drollness" is worse than her Dad's!

Here's the first one....








< Previous Abstract | Next Abstract >

Health Physics:
April 2007 - Volume 92 - Issue 4 - pp 349-357
doi: 10.1097/01.HP.0000251248.23991.35
Paper
CYTOGENETIC OBSERVATIONS IN HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LEUKOCYTES FOLLOWING IN VITRO EXPOSURE TO THz RADIATION: A PILOT STUDY
Zeni, O; Gallerano, G P.; Perrotta, A; Romanò, M; Sannino, A; Sarti, M; D'Arienzo, M; Doria, A; Giovenale, E; Lai, A; Messina, G; Scarfì, M R.

Abstract

Emerging technologies are considering the possible use of Terahertz radiation in different fields ranging from telecommunications to biology and biomedicine. The study of the potential effects of Terahertz radiation on biological systems is therefore an important issue in order to safely develop a variety of applications. This paper describes a pilot study devoted to determine if Terahertz radiation could induce genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood leukocytes. For this purpose, human whole blood samples from healthy donors were exposed for 20 min to Terahertz radiation. Since, to our knowledge, this is the first study devoted to the evaluation of possible genotoxic effects of such radiation, different electromagnetic conditions were considered. In particular, the frequencies of 120 and 130 GHz were chosen: the first one was tested at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 mW g-1, while the second one was tested at SAR levels of 0.24, 1.4, and 2 mW g-1. Chromosomal damage was evaluated by means of the cytokinesis block micronucleus technique, which also gives information on cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, human whole blood samples exposed to 130 GHz at SAR levels of 1.4 and 2 mW g-1 were also tested for primary DNA damage by applying the alkaline comet assay immediately after exposure. The results obtained indicate that THz exposure, in the explored electromagnetic conditions, is not able to induce either genotoxicity or alteration of cell cycle kinetics in human blood cells from healthy subjects.
©2007Health Physics Society
Home > April 2007 - Volume 92 - Issue 4 > CYTOGENETIC OBSERVATIONS IN HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LEUKOCYTE...




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posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


Extract (MMN) noting attenuation / penetration imaging limitations




Han et al (2000) compared time-domain transmission THz imaging with imaging using near-infrared pulses. As expected, the lower scattering meant that the THz attenuation image showed significantly enhanced contrast in an image of ametal structure in a sample of pork-fat
tissue. Research with tissue is concentrated in two areas; first, on diagnostic applications close to the body surface, because these are likely to be the first performed as a result of the strong water absorption that limits the depth of penetration. Second, researchers have considered
tissue that currentlymust be examined in vitro, butwhich, with technological advances, should in future be accessible to THz irradiation.
Although water absorption limits the depth of tissue that may be imaged, the presence of water may have its advantages. In particular, it may be possible to exploit the sensitivity of THz absorption to water content and use the degree of hydration of tissue as a measure of disease state. This was the case in the earliest work with tissue reported by Mittleman et al
(1996, 1999). Preliminary work with burnt chicken skin suggested that TPI may have applications in burn diagnostics and wound healing.

5. Conclusions and future work

The THz region of the EM spectrum was very difficult to explore, until recent advances made the generation and detection of the radiation possible. Many details of the interaction between THz radiation and biological tissue require elucidation. Interaction between the radiation and biological tissue may be exploited in the production of images, but it is possible that the development of high-resolution THz spectroscopy of small tissue samples will yield greater benefits, particularly as a probe for molecular dynamics, including the behaviour of DNA. However, much experimental work remains to be undertaken if useful information on
biological tissue structure content and function is to be gained.



Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not

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[edit on 2-1-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 12:32 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 

OK.....here's another one





INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY
Phys. Med. Biol. 47 (2002) R67–R84 PII: S0031-9155(02)31211-9
TOPICAL REVIEW
An introduction to medical imaging with coherent
terahertz frequency radiation
A J Fitzgerald1, E Berry1, N N Zinovev2, G C Walker1, M A Smith1
and J M Chamberlain2
1 Academic Unit of Medical Physics and Centre of Medical Imaging Research,
University of Leeds, Leeds, LS1 3EX, UK
2 Institute of Microwaves and Photonics, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK
Received 26 November 2001, in final form 23 January 2002
Published 20 March 2002
Online at stacks.iop.org/PMB/47/R67

Abstract

Methods have recently been developed that make use of electromagnetic
radiation at terahertz (THz) frequencies, the region of the spectrum between millimetre wavelengths and the infrared, for imaging purposes. Radiation at these wavelengths is non-ionizing and subject to far less Rayleigh scatter than visible or infrared wavelengths, making it suitable for medical applications. This paper introduces THz pulsed imaging and discusses its potential for in vivo medical applications in comparison with existing modalities.



Extract (MMN):




Measurements of the absorption coefficient of water show that it strongly attenuates signals in the THz region, with broad absorption peaks at 6 THz and 19.5 THz (Kindt and Schmuttenmaer 1996). This has strong implications for the use of TPI for medical imaging. On one hand the high absorption limits the depth of penetration of signals through
tissues with high moisture content, on the other, it makes THz methods very sensitive to changes in the water content of tissue. Measurements by Bezant (2000) demonstrated that a R70 Topical Review

THz pulse could be detected after penetration through at least 1.5 mm of moist skin tissue when the detection signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 500 to 1. This is considerably further than through water alone. Mittleman et al (1996) addressed the question of sensitivity to water content and suggested that for an SNR of 100, a minimum concentration given by n × x = 1016 cm−2 can be detected, where n is the density of water molecules and x is the path length.



THz image sample:






5. Developments

TPI is in the very earliest stages of its development, but it is possible to suggest how the field may mature. Endoscopic imaging by fibre optic delivery would allow access to tissues away from the surface of the body. The first steps towards this goal have been made with
the development of waveguides for THz radiation (Gallot et al 2000) and with the use of fibre optics in THz delivery (Johnson et al 2000). There is potential to enhance the performance of Topical Review R81
conventional excisional biopsies by using terahertz image and spectroscopic guidance to select biopsy sites. Itmay be possible to replace conventional biopsy by in situ spectroscopic analysis and to guide interventional procedures using terahertz technology. Intravascular imaging offers the promise of atherosclerotic plaque characterization, which is of great interest in the carotid artery. However, considerable technological developments are required for THz techniques to be used in the coronary arteries, where a resolution of 30–100 μm is necessary to resolve the layered structure of the vessel wall (Foster et al 2000). More rapid data acquisition opens up possibilities associated with the assessment of function and physiological processes, which can be of value in monitoring drug efficacy.
Although for many potential applications there are a number of alternative technologies, none has yet emerged as the ideal tool. It is inevitable that TPI will be added to the clinician’s armamentarium and be valued for the complementary information it can provide.
Multimodality developments may provide the greatest advances, by adding to existing techniques this new compact, non-contact imaging tool that is free from concerns about ionizing radiation hazards and making use of its potential for spectroscopic analysis coupled with low levels of scattering.



Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 

G'day again IgnoranceIsntBlisss

I've done a bunch more reading, but I'll leave my article posts at that for now.

So, my opinions are as follows:

- I believe those scanners are safe

- I believe "terror hertz" imaging has a limited future, when considered against imaging modalities such CT, MR, U/S & (the closely related) OCT.

I note that OCT appears to "have the jump" on THz imaging, having already solved many of the imaging problems associated with THz imaging.

For example, here is an OCT image of a coronary vessel into which has been inserted a stent. This is done to check the stent placement. The image is achieved by placing an imaging laser into the coronary vessel. These systems are now commercially available in limited numbers. This is some of the more recent imaging technology with which I am involved, which is revolutionising some areas of imaging....fascinating stuff!



I hope all this has been of some use & interest.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not


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posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by PreyBird
reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 


This is by no means an attack on your person, but are you Conservative? Just saying.
If you have a better solution to the said issue,why not study both sides and come to a just conclusion without bringing your emotions into it instead of reiterating someone elses OPINION... . Remember, most ideas are put in place to protect us from failure, but every once in a while, that small percentage of failed ideas can slip through the cracks. Us humans are, by no means, perfect. BUT at least we try.



In this case the clear solution is to eliminate the cause which is Terrorism. By doing that the need to take risks is eliminated.

These scanners serve only two possible purposes I can see. To protect or to control. If we eliminate the need to protect that leaves only control as a reason for them.

Being a Moderate, I've noticed the Left has abandoned its own principles by being for these Orwellian tactics. The Left wishes to apologize for the actions of Terrorists and protect them by screaming "Profiling" at every juncture, while at the same time demanding more freedoms be stripped away to protect them from the Terrorists they apologize for.

Is it any wonder many of us are now opposed to both the Left and the Right where common sense is clearly out to lunch?

We know who the Terrorists are. Eliminate them and let's get on with our lives. They are a disease, a plague on mankind and civilization. Anybody apologizing for or harboring them are breeding disease as surely as if it were a fatal virus in a test tube.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


What is your limit? At what point does the measures designed to protect and control us reach the point you won't support it any longer? When they start doing full body cavity searches to everyone boarding an airplane?

How did you feel the first time a just above minimum wage stranger felt up your Wife because she had a metal zipper on her pants? How about when a pedophile working for TSA gets a thrill viewing your children through one of these scanners? You know that is going to happen and is already happening now.

How much is too much. Are we all that terrified? That means the Terrorists have already won have they not?

When did we become so complacent we allow our rights to be taken fully away when we take a domestic flight from within the US to within the US?

I was standing right next to two TSA workers in Florida while they had a loud discussion about how people were dressed and who the Terrorists were and who they were going to screw with in line. If I'd had a tape recorder what they said would make an decent person vomit. They turned out to be supervisors of some sort. Made my skin crawl but I had to get on that plane to get back home. I don't like the way it made me feel to allow such sick people to control me, even for the few moments it lasted. I knew for a moment what it is like to live in a Communist or Fascist State. The line is getting very thin and there are breaches in it.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 02:30 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Ok thanks for getting us somewhere with those abstracts, but now what I think we need is wattage levels to cause DNA disruption, at x distances and durations, and then we compare that to what is found inside those big metal looking boxes with the window we see in the photos.

I'm also curious the implications of the new papers explaination of why past studies had problems compared to their new technique, and if that applies to the herein-relevant abstracts you've posted. If you could be so kind...



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 02:45 AM
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Originally posted by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Ok thanks for getting us somewhere with those abstracts, but now what I think we need is wattage levels to cause DNA disruption, at x distances and durations, and then we compare that to what is found inside those big metal looking boxes with the window we see in the photos.

I'm also curious the implications of the new papers explaination of why past studies had problems compared to their new technique, and if that applies to the herein-relevant abstracts you've posted. If you could be so kind...


G'day again IgnoranceIsntBliss


I think you might be trying to simplify a little too much, an area that is extremely complex.

Think about the coronary OCT image I posted.

That is obtained by inserting a laser into an extremely small coronary vessel on the wall of the heart & "blasting away" to get those pictures.

Whilst in reality its extremly safe when used by an experienced operator (i.e. a skilled interventional cardiologist), one could argue that it's not safe if one tried hard enough.

That might not be a great example, but I'm trying to make a point - there's always a risk with imaging technology that can be exaggerated by people who aren't involved in that area of technology.

CT scanning has it's risks - look up dose rates for multi detector CT exams (MDCT); look up contrast induced nephropathy (CNS)

MR scanning has it's risks - look up nephrotic systemic fibrosis (NSF)

U/S might even have its risks - look up doppler power level issues in feotal heart scanning)

Nothwithstanding my above commentary, I'll see if I can oblige by approaching this from the aspect of safety trial data.

I'll also try to find some info regarding what regulatory body controls this technology application & see if I can post their regulations / guidelines / conclusions.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 

G'day Blaine91555

I fly world-wide many times each year for business.

I am renowned as the one who always complains the loudest about security. I am often told by my travelling companions..."now just shuttup this time!"

I remember the day when I called one of the airport security guys a "rock ape".....I was there for a while


Some of my episodes have become legendary with my colleagues


I HATE all this stuff.

However, I don't believe these devices are a health risk.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not.

[edit on 2-1-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


The Provision model operates for 10 seconds, and the unit as a whole operates at 1900 watts peak:
rebelmodel.com...


Height: 2665.0 mm (104.9")
Width: 1947.8 mm (76.7")
Depth: 2651.1 mm (104.4")
Weight: 816 kg (1800 lbs)
Power: 100 VAC - 240 VAC / 1900 Watts Peak
50 hz - 60 hz
Temperature: 0° C to 35° C (32° F to 104° F)
Humidity: 5 – 95% non-condensing


Here's a fun one for math. I'm out of practice in playing with these sorts of spatial numbers. But I can say that the monitor should be between 100-300 watts, and the PC should be from 100-400 watts assuming they are part of the numbers provided. If anyone would like to email them; I'm not int he mood right now.

Then again, this other style unit by RapidScan uses only a 120w powersupply the brocure says, with the video monitoring equipment being completely external:
www.rapiscansystems.com...


Power Supply
External Supply, 100 to 240 VAC, 47-63 Hz, 120 W; output 12 VDC, 10 A
Detector Millimeter Wave Frequency
80 to 100 GHz (90 GHz center frequency,
20 GHz bandwidth)
Operating Temperature
-10°C to 50°C (14°F to 122°F)
Operating Humidity
0 to 100% RH condensing (outdoor use)
Dimensions (H X W X D):
83.8 cm x 34.5 cm x 34.9 cm (33.0 in x 13.5 in x 13.7 in) excluding mounting bracket


They even state the operating frequencies. Provision doesn't. I wonder why such a broad difference in power consumption.


[edit on 2-1-2010 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 03:13 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 

G'day again


As you can see, none of those spec's indicate output or exposure metrics.

I don't believe there is anything inherently unusual about the varying input requirements.

I'll have a look into output & exposure metrics, in addition to safety & regulatory data.

I think all that might take a while, so I mightn't be able to do that until tomorow morning.

Kind regards
Maybe...maybe not.


[edit on 2-1-2010 by Maybe...maybe not]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 03:59 AM
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reply to post by Maybe...maybe not
 


Thank you kind sir. You sound to me like a subject matter expert.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 04:06 AM
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reply to post by IgnoranceIsntBlisss
 

Thank you....that is very kind of you!

I hope I can come up with something interesting.

It's getting a little late here now & I'm getting all "ATS'd out"


I'll have a few big caffeine hits in the morning & see what I can find.

Cheers again
Maybe...maybe not



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 04:09 AM
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These scanners should be thoroughly tested by medical experts to make sure they are not harmful to human beings! They are being rushed through due to another CIA false attack!



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 04:36 AM
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Originally posted by endisnighe
I had a feeling these scanners would not be safe. Hell, might as well set up x ray machines.

Remember the movie where they guy stuffed the bomb up the bad guy's bum.

I cannot remember it, I picture the guy from The Transporter for some reason.

Anyway, what will stop a terrorist from doing that.

Next we will have x ray machines set up.

WTH.


It was Denzel Washington in MAN ON FIRE...playing role of bodyguard for little girl who appears to be kidnapped.
www.imdb.com...



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by DCPatriot

Originally posted by endisnighe
I had a feeling these scanners would not be safe. Hell, might as well set up x ray machines.

Remember the movie where they guy stuffed the bomb up the bad guy's bum.

I cannot remember it, I picture the guy from The Transporter for some reason.

Anyway, what will stop a terrorist from doing that.

Next we will have x ray machines set up.

WTH.


It was Denzel Washington in MAN ON FIRE...playing role of bodyguard for little girl who appears to be kidnapped.
www.imdb.com...


Don't forget that AQ have already tried the "internal bomb",in an attempt to assasinate a Saudi Prince:


Security and intelligence experts are deeply worried by a new development in suicide bombing, the BBC has learned. It has emerged that an al-Qaeda bomber who died last month while trying to blow up a Saudi prince in Jeddah had hidden the explosives inside his body. Only the attacker died, but it is feared that the new development could be copied by others. Experts say it could have implications for airport security, rendering traditional metal detectors "useless".


news.bbc.co.uk...

Would the new scanners have detected that type of bomb?
Are the authorities taking this type of attack into account?

I hope these new scanners will be optional-I think they are at the moment in Manchester UK where they are being piloted-You may opt for the pat down search if you don't want to go through the scanner.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 06:16 AM
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This reminds me of the Monty Pyton's Meaning of Life film.
Do we have the machine that says "PING!"


The price for these scanners starts from $170.000, and new models will be available soon (more expensive).

That's the primary reason they are being installed, not because of security.
Profit. Don't waste this "crisis". It brings us money. Passengers will gladly pay for their own safety, won't they... (rubbing hands :lol

Hey, lets make another crisis
Lets hire someone to explode a bubble gum inside a plane. How he's gonna smuggle a bubble gum into a plane? Don't worry, it won't be detected...


Also, their psychological impact and damage may be worse than physiological.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 07:22 AM
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www.er.doe.gov/bes/reports/files/THz_rpt.pdf

"Several recent papers have demonstrated the ability to detect single and double stranded DNA
sequences. Refinement of this work will lead to label-free sensors based on complementary
DNA hybridization. The THz spectra of the individual DNA base pairs have been obtained.
There is an extraordinary range of opportunities with regard to DNA dynamics and conductivity. "

"Resonances in the THz region are
thermally populated, and represent the low frequency collective modes of a molecule involving
many atoms which are the gateway to thermalization of higher frequency modes. "

" High THz fields will induce
molecular orientational motion, or interionic motion, leading to changes in local structure and a
non-equilibrium distribution of geometries. "

"The conformational flexibility necessary for such
dynamics to occur comes from the collective THz frequency modes of the protein. If those
modes are frozen out, the ability to change structure is lost; and structural changes are critically important to biological activity."


"Figure 6.5 displays the absorption
coefficient of a single-stranded DNA pentamer at room temperature and at 10 K. A distinct
feature is present at 10 K that is absent at room temperature which is due to highly anharmonic
vibrations. " (Figure 6.5 Effect of temperature on absorption
coefficient of single-stranded DNA pentamer. A mode is
present at low temperature, but is washed out due to
disorder at room temperature. Figure courtesy of Peter
Jepsen, University of Freiburg. )

"Similarly water in nanopores in porous media and water in micelles should have spectroscopic signatures in the THz which are different from bulk water. Ideally, one would like to know molecular structure
and dynamics as a function of distance from the walls of the nanopore. Water in these environments may catalyze chemical reactions or biofunction. In general, water at the air/water,
water/solid, and water/membrane interfaces of biology will all differ from bulk liquid water. The water density, pH, orientational order, lateral order, hydrogen-bonding, etc., are all different and
vary as a function of distance from the interface. These systems are largely unexplored in the THz regime, and their properties will determine the unique chemistry and biofunction at interfacial water systems. "

"For example, one could envisage
performing time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments in a protein such as myoglobin which is
known to have large scale sub-nanosecond dynamics which THz ps synchronous with the X-rays
is used to drive specific collective modes of the protein. "

"In both cases, time-resolved IR in the finger-print
vibrational region is essential in understanding changes in structure coherent with the THz
excitation and time-resolving the chemical or biological product of reaction. Time-resolved
visible absorption and/or fluorescence can also be used as indicators of molecular change and
reaction but they are less generally applicable than IR spectroscopy. "

"Terahertz generation at semiconductor surfaces produces
half-cycle pulses that can reach field levels on the order of 100 kV/cm"


"The extent of inhomogeneity of the THz absorption
spectrum of biomolecules for example is not well known, so there is a need for the ability to vary
the line width of the THz radiation to 1% or better of the central frequency. Some applications,
such as THz electromagnetic resonance studies, can utilize cw sources. Continuous-wave THz
ESR sources, however, must be of high power, on the order of 1 – 10 W to saturate the system in
the ESR experiments."

" Terahertz radiation is strongly absorbed by water, but differences in tissue water, architecture and chemical content can actually contribute to contrast mechanisms"


This is for those that still think that THz waves dont do anythink to your body.





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