Secrecy is Repugnant: An honest request to Masons.

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posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by Josephus23
Have you ever had a Chinon?


Yes, but not one of my personal favorites. I am more of a Piedmont and Left Bank person myself.


Seriously, when somebody describes the nose on a wine, they don't use 3 or 4 or 5 adjectives. Usually someone is doing well to be able to point to one distinctive character on the nose of a wine.
The only time a varietal is described in the way that you have described it is in a reference manual.
You know that I am right.


Maybe someone should tell Robert Parker and James Suckling. They seem to not subscribe to your theory on wine bouquet distinction. Their reviews of the 2005 Chateau Lafite Rothschild is rather succint in their use of several descriptors to convey the aromas of the wine they are tasting. Much like every other wine that they, and others, review on a regular basis.

But you knew that of course. I suppose living with ones mother would enable them to aquire a vast collection of choice varietals and thereby contribute to their stagering oeniphilic knowledge. Does mummy help you with your daunting grasp of Masonry as well?


I know wine Masonicus.


Yes, I am sure that Thunderbird is always the the word at Mommy's house.


Please...

I am not sure why you want to play the living with your parents card.

I mean. You are wrong, but other than that it is well....

Wrong. Anyway.

You are such an amateur. If you actually knew what you were talking about then you would know that the best wines come out of Burgundy, but the money wines come out of Bordeaux. (and if you wanted money, then why not go right bank with Chateau Petrus?)

Anyone with taste buds can differentiate between the flavors in a big wine, but a real snob will let you blow your money on those big name wines wine and drink lighter, more complex varietals. (Any Grand Cru house in Burgundy or maybe a Chateauneuf du Pape, Brunello, etc...)

Your mainstream choice for "what is the best" is not at all surprising given your amateur status.

Oh and by the way.

Your argument for the Piedmont is noted. Good wines come out of the Piedmont.




posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by Izarith
 


Let it be noted that I have a sense of humor.

Maybe I am a reverse plant. My mission is to make Masonry seem more palatable (man I am funny) and show its ridiculous nature.

Can't we all just get along.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by Josephus23]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by Josephus23
Maybe I am a reverse plant. My mission is to make Masonry seem more palatable (man I am funny) and show its ridiculous nature.


Any gathering of men is laughable. Just ask any woman; they'll set you straight!


eta: And as an addendum, as the years have gone on, I've become more of a beer man. Just enjoying a Muskoka Cream Ale as I type (which is getting harder and harder......but I digress). [/derail]

[edit on 18-1-2010 by Fitzgibbon]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 07:45 PM
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Originally posted by Josephus23
If you actually knew what you were talking about then you would know that the best wines come out of Burgundy, but the money wines come out of Bordeaux. (and if you wanted money, then why not go right bank with Chateau Petrus?)


Burgundy has always been rather hit or miss as the consistency varies greatly from year to year and even from bottle to bottle. This has been my experience-and that of some of my friends-even from top producers. I had 3 of 6 bottles of 2001 Alain Burguet Gevrey Chambertin age rather poorly, so much so that 2 were undrinkable.

I have found the consistency from the top line Chateaus in Bordeaux to be more in line with my expectations. I have never been let down by Leoville-Barton, Palmer or Las Cases. More importantly they pair better with the food that I serve them with.

I have found Petrus to be overpriced for what it is. I would rather spend the money on several cases then a few bottles.


Anyone with taste buds can differentiate between the flavors in a big wine, but a real snob will let you blow your money on those big name wines wine and drink lighter, more complex varietals. (Any Grand Cru house in Burgundy or maybe a Chateauneuf du Pape, Brunello, etc...)


Personal preference. I have a fair collection of Chatenueufs and Burgundies but I prefer Barolo, Barbaresco and Bordeaux. Not to mention Amarone and Super Tuscans.


Your mainstream choice for "what is the best" is not at all surprising given your amateur status.


What is the best for me, I never advocated that others should have the same preference or palate. Only a clown would run around and dictate what other people should and should not do. Whether with their wine or with the affiliations they choose to make.


Your argument for the Piedmont is noted. Good wines come out of the Piedmont.


I would hope so since half of my cellar is from there.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 08:07 PM
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We really should get you trying some Beamsville Bench Niagara reds, AM.

And Josephus if you're feeling ambitious



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by Fitzgibbon
We really should get you trying some Beamsville Bench Niagara reds, AM.


Still waiting for the 5W30 we talked about last time.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus

Originally posted by Fitzgibbon
We really should get you trying some Beamsville Bench Niagara reds, AM.


Still waiting for the 5W30 we talked about last time.


Hmmm. Gonna have to figure out how to sneak that across the border. Maybe I could lob it across the Rainbow Bridge. Might take a while to settle though.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 08:56 PM
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You guys are funny.

I thought that what I said was a tasteful way to end the thread.

Masonicus. I even found your response funny. The wines that you like are the same one's that every restaurant in the good 'ole USA has in stock.

Go to any decent room and you will find Barolo, Barbaresco, Amarone, Chianti Classicos, yada, yada.
I know you. You like steakhouses and American Cab. You like big fat wines.
Take your 5W30 Niagara Vineyards whatever....

(psssssss..... here's a little secret. The waitresses make fun of you behind your back, and if they don't hire women at the steakhouses that you guys frequent, then its the gay waiters).

I am a bit thrown that you didn't comment on the Brunello.

You must know a good Brunello.

It's cool man, but I recommend variety.

You guys can have this thread if you would like.

Any person that is in any way paying attention and reading can see my message.

Peese.


[edit on 18-1-2010 by Josephus23]

[edit on 18-1-2010 by Josephus23]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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Just to clarify, 5W30's a beer; Neustadt Springs to be more precise. It's Guiness-like although not quite so heavy on the palate (I find anyway). Niagara wines are perhaps more a matter of taste. However, apparently Le Clos Jordanne's Claystone Terrace 2005 (a Chardonnay) has made some waves amongst palates attuned to French and Californian offerings and I'm partial to Henry of Pelham's Pinot Noirs.

But that's just me. Sorry for the OT



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by Josephus23
I know you. You like steakhouses and American Cab.


I do not frequent steakhouses and do not partake of California Cabernet. I prefer Italian and French cuisine when drinking my wine.


Take your 5W30 Niagara Vineyards whatever....


That would be a beer, not a wine.


I am a bit thrown that you didn't comment on the Brunello.


I enjoy Brunello as well. I loaded up on the 2004. I am also partial to Southern Italian reds such as Anglianico and Taurasi.


You guys can have this thread if you would like.


Fine, maybe we can wait around for the evidence we were promised.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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And all this time I thought Mad Dog 20/20 was a champagne. Go figure.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by AugustusMasonicus
 

I do enjoy a good sirloin or NY strip. As for wines, I'm partial to Malbecs, but I'll drink most wines. I'm more of a whiskey fan, but I digress.

reply to post by Masonic Light
 

Mad Dog!!?? I just vomited a little.


Originally posted by Josephus23
(psssssss..... here's a little secret. The waitresses make fun of you behind your back, and if they don't hire women at the steakhouses that you guys frequent, then its the gay waiters).

How do you know? And really, what does that have to do with anything other than some personal attack to boost your ego?

[edit on 19-1-2010 by KSigMason]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 12:33 PM
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Strongest drink I uh... drink is my morning coffee.

The only "beer" I drink is root beer.

I must humbly acknowledge your great and encompassing knowledge of alcoholic beverages.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:58 PM
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Originally posted by KSigMason
I do enjoy a good sirloin or NY strip.


Nothing like a 3 inch thick porterhouse, but I prefer to cook it myself. I am rather finicky on how my steaks are prepared.


I'm more of a whiskey fan, but I digress.


Single malt or blended? Nothing beats a good scotch and cigar after dinner......except maybe a good cognac.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus
Nothing beats a good scotch and cigar after dinner......except maybe a good cognac.


My Lord!
Nothing?

Nothing whatsoever!?

Lord, oh Lord, don't let me get so old that good Scotch and a cigar are the benchmarks of sensory satisfaction.

We now return you to your regularly-scheduled thread.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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Originally posted by AugustusMasonicus
Single malt or blended? Nothing beats a good scotch and cigar after dinner......except maybe a good cognac.

Oh single malt. My gift to myself for my 25th birthday was a $140 bottle of Triple Distilled, Single Malt, Very Rare Irish Whiskey made by Midleton.

My favorite Bourbon is Jefferson Reserve, but that is blended only in small batches. I could drink that stuff like water.



posted on Sep, 24 2011 @ 10:10 PM
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Originally posted by infobrazil

"Tell me who you hang around with, and I'll tell you who you are."



That doesn't always work.

"Show me the prey, and I'll show you where to find the predator."

There are wolves in sheep's clothing, and sheep dressed up as wolves too.



posted on Sep, 25 2011 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by DRAZIW
 

Wait? I thought the predators were goats?



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by KSigMason
reply to post by DRAZIW
 

Wait? I thought the predators were goats?



Yah, they are on the same farm as the sheep though.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 06:12 PM
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reply to post by DRAZIW
 

Sometimes your insanities make me smile.



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