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Lcross last minute before impact

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posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by Exuberant1
 


come on mate we are all waiting for the photos

do you have one of them zapping the Centaur or lcross

before impact




posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by KEMIK
 




yeah that guy was keen to make a quick exit. he looked a bit pissed off may he had to pick up his kid from school and was late.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:34 AM
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wow that walk out guy looked seriously cheesed off about something,
the way he grabs his jacket to leave. I guess he was expecting more than the pathetic non-show. would love to know his take on things.

So they are busy editing, or channeling the pre-prepared images to all the `Real News Outlets`. And they wonder why so many people dont trust Nasa.

If we dont get a whole bunch of amateur and professional astronomers showing their own images then I`m afraid we dont believe a word.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:40 AM
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go to 4.37 on this vid to see the guy leaving real quick.

www.youtube.com...

he knows its BS doen't he.

the guy in the red looks at him straight away as he's streaching.
and the two at the front look puzzeled at what his problem is.

i think he just realized he saw more than 2 flashes in the red not where they aimed and realized this is bollocks i'm out of here.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:43 AM
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LOL LOL
Coming to this thread is quite refreshing.
Kinda like a Super Bowl party.
NASA is the team with the pink pants.
PS "Anyone got some ICE?"

[edit on 9-10-2009 by Donny 4 million]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:44 AM
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the nasa guys also clapped at different times (slightly) like they had lost contact and dident expect the hit yet, one guy was takeing head phones of so he knew it was dead , then he hung them on monitor and was like oh are we clapping.The young guy at the front looked round to say duh what you claping at ,gee boss this aint supposed to happen not at all like the sim, just like a honest green younger person would do. before the older guys tell em we do tell lies, do as and what you ere told so just clap and keep your mouth shut you do want a paycheck at end of mth and ya pension/health benefits.
Also the guy unplugged his laptop wouldnt hi five because he new this was all wrong ( im er of now i want to check the dater, er,em on my own, er-- em got to be quick eyes everywhere , em good quick i have only copy, jeez , quick to my office).
NOW my opinion is the aliens zapped it before impact and left camera on other missile to watch.. to say dont mess with our moon you are soon to be extinct, and we are starting to run another experiment with dolphins with legs on our planet your time is up and failed with highest detremental planetery impact seen in a spieces in 200 billion years that we have been evolving sentient beings .

india saidd that water is on moon


i dont follow nasa anymore since the astronauts talked they are more personel than money grabing /contract wielding suits with no interest but
money. and politics







[edit on 9-10-2009 by dashar]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 08:44 AM
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Originally posted by KEMIK
Did anyone notice the behavior of the guy in the black shirt and khaki pants? He appears to be in quite a hurry to pack up and leave while everyone else is celebrating. The guy in the red shirt attempts to give him a "high five" and he appears to say something to him and does not reciprocate. He packs up the rest of his belongings and exits the room. Just thought it was odd.


In body language the guy in the chair leaned back with his hands clasped behind his head.

Apparently this means...

Leaning back in chair with both hands clasped behind head - means he is in an analytical mood, but it is also a gesture of superiority.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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The impactor DID hit it's target, and they did get a lot of data.

Even if it couldn't be seen in visible light, the other instruments on LCROSS got very useful data. "Seeing" the impact in visible light may be important to the common person, but it is not very important for the science portion of the mission.


Originally posted by dashar...india new that water is on moon
..

So did NASA. NASA told us about water on the moon back in 1994. LCROSS is hopefully going to tell us more about that water.


[edit on 10/9/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


thks i dident know that about nasa thought india was first



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by CannotGoHome
If we dont get a whole bunch of amateur and professional astronomers showing their own images then I`m afraid we dont believe a word.

Unfortunately all I have to offer is my word. I was taking a series of still images and I saw a very brief faint flash along the crater rim while looking through the camera's viewfinder between exposures. If I had blinked I would have missed it several times over. I looked down at my watch and noticed that the time was right and assumed I had seen the impact flash. LCROSS apparently saw nothing, but perhaps it happened during CCD readout, or they had their levels set all wrong expecting a brighter flash? All I know is what I saw, unless I'm losing my mind.

[edit on 9-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 10:40 AM
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Originally posted by ocker
Hi Mate
the only impacts are on the star gazers. sore necks and strained eyes

Heh, more like sore back (heavy equipment), but are you kidding? I was all excited when I saw the flash, then I'm told that's impossible since no one else saw it. The lack of a plume was dissapointing, but I was still quite content with having seen the flash of impact with my own eye.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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NASA probes give moon a double smack

...NASA officials said their instruments were working, but live photos of the actual crash were missing.




Deja-Vu? Anybody?



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by Strype


NASA probes give moon a double smack

...NASA officials said their instruments were working, but live photos of the actual crash were missing.




Deja-Vu? Anybody?


What do we really see in this video? A zoom in on a crater. Picture going white when the rocket is still far out in space. Some guys in a control room.

Draw your own conclusions.


[edit on 9-10-2009 by Copernicus]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:33 PM
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Originally posted by Copernicus
What do we really see in this video? A zoom in on a crater. Some guys in a control room.

Draw your own conclusions.

Are you implying the mission was a hoax? Why would it be a hoax? Maybe I saw an impact flash, or maybe I'm delusional, but the one thing I'm sure of is that it wasn't a hoax.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter
Maybe I saw an impact flash, or maybe I'm delusional,


I certainly don't think you are delucional.


And during the press conferane about the LCROSS impact it was said that a sodium flash was observed, perhaps that is what you saw?

New Scientist also reports this:


One positive report came from Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona, where a flash of visible light revealing the presence of sodium was recorded during the impact.

www.newscientist.com...



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by ziggystar60

I certainly don't think you are delucional.


And during the press conferane about the LCROSS impact it was said that a sodium flash was observed, perhaps that is what you saw?

New Scientist also reports this:


One positive report came from Kitt Peak Observatory in Arizona, where a flash of visible light revealing the presence of sodium was recorded during the impact.

www.newscientist.com...

THANK YOU! I didn't get to see the press conference, so I wasn't aware Kitt Peak saw a visible light flare from the impact. I don't feel quite so crazy now, but I am still surprised that I haven't heard of any other amateurs seeing what I saw, and I can't find any info on just how bright the flare was. I suppose it could be that everyone was anticipating witnessing the plume and planned accordingly (myself included), so the initial light flare was not the prime target. There's no way I could have captured it even had I known it was coming; it was too faint for video and too fast for still photography.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:23 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter

Originally posted by Copernicus
What do we really see in this video? A zoom in on a crater. Some guys in a control room.

Draw your own conclusions.

Are you implying the mission was a hoax? Why would it be a hoax? Maybe I saw an impact flash, or maybe I'm delusional, but the one thing I'm sure of is that it wasn't a hoax.


It most likely is not a hoax. What's to hoax?
It is more like look, look up there at the moon.
And when you are intently straining your eyes ---NASA is helping it's self to the contents of our wallets.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Originally posted by Copernicus

Originally posted by Strype


NASA probes give moon a double smack

...NASA officials said their instruments were working, but live photos of the actual crash were missing.




Deja-Vu? Anybody?


What do we really see in this video? A zoom in on a crater. Picture going white when the rocket is still far out in space. Some guys in a control room.

Draw your own conclusions.


[edit on 9-10-2009 by Copernicus]


For a minute it looked like we were getting our first look at a new Google Moon project. The entire footage was lame at best and NASA wonders why ratings for moments like these always are smaller than what they predict.



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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Originally posted by Donny 4 million
It most likely is not a hoax. What's to hoax?

The ability to launch a probe to the moon. The ability to control a rocket in deep space. Some people who've posted here before don't think we're capable of even that, honest.


It is more like look, look up there at the moon.
And when you are intently straining your eyes ---NASA is helping it's self to the contents of our wallets.

I look up at the moon all the time anyway, how does this change anything? Furthermore, this was a relatively small extension of a much larger mission (LRO), so this was an afterthought based on some unanticipated extra payload room. If it's not a hoax then they really did collect data for real (even if it's a partly negative result), and if they really collected data then at least we got something for our money.

We'll know more now about the dynamics of lunar impacts than we would had we not done this mission, which will be important knowledge for calculating and mitigating the risks and dangers of secondary debris following larger meteroid strikes close to long-term manned missions/bases. If ejecta is not thrown as far during moon strikes as we thought it would be, then that would probably be a good sign for future manned missions. Of course this data may only be applicable to impacts near the poles, but it just so happens that the poles are a major target for future manned missions.

Last, but not least, the water vapor plume that was supposed to extend far above the material ejecta would be invisible to regular cameras anyway, so we may yet at least find out whether there's significant amounts of water there.

[edit on 9-10-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Oct, 9 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by Exuberant1
 


well done getting the link fixed interesting to see what the skeptics say.

there is definitely some sort of flash.

Ocker



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