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I've just seen something strange, the satellite stopped.

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posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 03:52 PM
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Similar situation happened to my daughter and I a few months ago.

We were walking the dog to the local school to let him run around at about 10:30pm-ish. He was doing his own thing and I was passing the time by showing my daughter different stars and constellations. I always keep a keen eye out for satellites and saw one moving across the sky. She was excited to see it for the first time. As we were watching it it just stopped. It was moving at a decent rate for a while then just halted.

We watched for a while and I'm tryin to explain any reason it couldve stopped but to no avail. She then saw another satellite moving in a path toward the first one. The new one passed right by it very closely but continued on without slowing. The one that did stop though seemed to start moving around after a while. Just very small circular movements, almost unnoticeable.

We still talk about it. My wife didn't get too excited when we told her but me and my daughter still get a kick out it. She loves looking at the night sky with me now. Funny I guess, the satellite that brought a ten year old bieber fever girl closer to her old man. She still won't let me cross the yellow line when I walk her to school though.
edit on 11-9-2011 by IllMannered because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
reply to post by michael1983l
 


No, they can't
they need the momentum to remain in orbit, otherwise they would just fall back to Earth. They might use engines to reposition, but never stop.


Yes they do, does a geo stationary satellite drop out of the sky? no they don't otherwise your dish at home would have to have a tracking system. I work for a Satellite broadcaster, what is your credentials?



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by derpif
 


Absolutely but Geo Stationary Satellites do exactly that 24 hours a day 365 days a year. It is hardly out of the ordinary, it is common practice.

Put it this way, surveillance satellites are often low orbit but will move around the globe very fast. If they have something they need to keep an eye on they may use fuel to slow it down to the point where it matches the earths rotation speed.
edit on 11-9-2011 by michael1983l because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by michael1983l
 


Thats just silly, a geostationary is moving at 7000 miles per hour at the equator, it certainly isn't still. Unless you believe the Earth is at the centre of the universe, doesn't spin and everything revolves around it....you don't believe that do you?

EDIT: The velocity of a satellite has to be sufficient to overcome the pull of the earths gravity, but not so great that it buggers off into the depths of space.
edit on 11/9/11 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


I'm talking about stationary in comparison to earth of course. Exactly what the OP would be describing.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by michael1983l
 


No, you were saying that they stopped, which is nonesense. Just because they stationary to the observer on Earth, doesn't mean they aren't still moving at speed to overcome the effects of Earths gravity. So either you came across wrong by poorly explaining yourself, or you were just completley wrong. Reading back over your replies leads me to believe the latter.

I said they did not stop, your response......................


Originally posted by michael1983l
Yes they do, does a geo stationary satellite drop out of the sky? no they don't otherwise your dish at home would have to have a tracking system.

edit on 11/9/11 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Ok ok you think I am not talking sense. Answer me a few questions then.

What is a translation frequency?

What bands to satellites operate in?

How many miles from earth would be classed as geostationary?

What is Ku?

What is an LNA?

What is a transponder?

Who are World Skies?



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 04:45 PM
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I really don't see the relevence of your questions, I will answer them to the best of my ability anyway. You were still wrong about satellites coming to a stop though...............



Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by woogleuk
 


Ok ok you think I am not talking sense. Answer me a few questions then.

What is a translation frequency? Moving the signal to another part of the axis

What bands to satellites operate in? C and some use Ku

How many miles from earth would be classed as geostationary? on average about 25,000 miles, hence the lower speed as the Earths gravity is less.

What is Ku? K-under or "Kurz-unten"

What is an LNA? Low noise amplifier (christ a child could answer that one)

What is a transponder? Transmitter responder

Who are World Skies? The whacky dutch lot that stick a lot of them up there.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
I really don't see the relevence of your questions, I will answer them to the best of my ability anyway. You were still wrong about satellites coming to a stop though...............



Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by woogleuk
 


Ok ok you think I am not talking sense. Answer me a few questions then.

What is a translation frequency? Moving the signal to another part of the axis WRONG

What bands to satellites operate in? C and some use Ku - X Band, Ka so again Wrong

How many miles from earth would be classed as geostationary? on average about 25,000 miles, hence the lower speed as the Earths gravity is less. Wrong again it is 22,236 miles and that gives 23 hours and 58 seconds of accuracy.

What is Ku? K-under or "Kurz-unten" Wow you got one

What is an LNA? Low noise amplifier (christ a child could answer that one)
Well you appear to be one, why would one need a low noise amplifyer in regards to satellite broadcasting?
What is a transponder? Transmitter responder Wrong - in terms of satellites it is referring to a space segment on said satellite

Who are World Skies? The whacky dutch lot that stick a lot of them up there.

Actually they are american now as they have been taken over. Well done on answering the questions you can find on google and also well done on not answering the questions you cannot find on google



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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I saw something similar some 45 years ago. My parents had bought me a small Tasco refractor with a tripod for Christmas. I was in a boarding school for gifted kids at the time.. I friend of mine from Venezuela came home with me for spring vacation since his parents had decided the cost to fly him back was not worth the time they would have with him. We lived in a house on Savannah Beach, GA. Most of the houses on the beach had the living accomodations on the 2nd floor to take advantage of breeze and view. There was a large wooden deck off of my parents bedroom. My friend and I had dragged the telescope out on the deck to see what we could see. After a few minutes we saw what we thought was a satellite coming off the ocean heading east to west. We watched it for a minute and then I tried to get it in the telescope. As I was looking back and forth from the telescope to the object my friend poked me in the arm and said, "Look! It stopped!" I immediately looked back up and sure enough it had stopped. While we were both looking at it it blinked off. Like someone turned a switch. We immediately ran back inside and told my parents who were uninterested and unimpressed. We both saw it so I'm pretty sure it was real. Since this would have been around 1967 there weren't a whole lot of satellites in the sky. And even then as a budding amateur astronomer I knew satellites don't hover. I still have no idea what it was.



posted on Sep, 11 2011 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by michael1983l

Ok ok you think I am not talking sense. Answer me a few questions then.

What is a translation frequency? Moving the signal to another part of the axis WRONG



Frequency translation is the process of moving a signal from one part of the frequency axis
, so not wrong


What bands to satellites operate in? C and some use Ku - X Band, Ka so again Wrong



Fixed Service Satellites use the C band, and the lower portions of the Ku bands
, so again, not wrong, plus you didn't specify which satellites


How many miles from earth would be classed as geostationary? on average about 25,000 miles, hence the lower speed as the Earths gravity is less. Wrong again it is 22,236 miles and that gives 23 hours and 58 seconds of accuracy.



All Earth geosynchronous orbits have a semi-major axis of 42,164 km (26,199 mi), A satellite in such an orbit is at an altitude of approximately 35,786 km (22,236 mi)
, so on average 25,000 miles or so, so not wrong really AGAIN.


What is Ku? K-under or "Kurz-unten" Wow you got one


Actually, I have them all......so far.


What is an LNA? Low noise amplifier (christ a child could answer that one)
Well you appear to be one, why would one need a low noise amplifyer in regards to satellite broadcasting?


Facing defeat you resort to name calling? I am a 31 year old man, married with 2 children thank you very much.But to answer your addon question, because the recieved signal is so low it needs amplified.


What is a transponder? Transmitter responder Wrong - in terms of satellites it is referring to a space segment on said satellite



The term Transponder, which is the short form of Transmitter-responder and sometimes abbreviated to XPDR, XPNDR or TPDR, is found in telecommunication applications. This is a device that receives signals from the Earth station, amplifies it and sends them for processing.


He shoots, he scores!! (ie, i was right again, transponder is made up of them two words, don't care about the function tbh)


Who are World Skies? The whacky dutch lot that stick a lot of them up there.

Actually they are american now as they have been taken over. Well done on answering the questions you can find on google and also well done on not answering the questions you cannot find on google


If you must know, I only used Google for two of them, and that was just to check I was right.

All this because I showed you to be wrong about the fact that satellites stop when they don't.
edit on
edit on 11/9/11 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/9/11 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 05:49 AM
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reply to post by michael1983l
 


Thanks for answering my question



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by derpif
 


You could also google "Geostationary transfer orbit"



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 12:38 PM
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You could be seeing an Observatory moving it's laser to a point in the sky to view. The Observatory uses the laser to diagnose atmospheric conditions so they can alter their focal lens/mirror and get better images of what they are looking at in space.

To someone else on the ground....the laser moving across the sky and stopping....might make you think it is something. But it's nothing, just an Observatory. The US Air Force actually limits them at times when they can use those lasers to adjust their mirrors/lenses.




As you look into the night sky you are also looking into Earth's magnetotail as the Sun's Solar Wind blast over the planet and extend the Earth's magnetic field out into space. There's a "Neutral Sheet" out there with some very odd things happening. It is possible to have a satellite/spacecraft come to a complete stop and sit there in the magnetotail in the Neutral Sheet.

There is massive energy there. Odd things happening such as you have the North Pole/South Pole fields flipping as the Solar Winds make the Magnetotail wave. Could a 2,000 pound spacecraft go from 10,000 miles per hour to zero in the Neutral Sheet? Start reading the scientific articles published by various countries on it.

Odd things happen/are capable in that region. ...Maybe they figured out how to stop a satellite in that region. There's definitely some interesting reading on what they've found there in the last 10 years.



posted on Sep, 12 2011 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


a good portion of my observations were carried out between dusk and midnight. that would be a flank/flank+ of the magnetotail during that period. i understand the neutral sheet observations to be around 14 times earth radius and not observed any closer. (may be wrong on that tho)
the points of light observed seem consistent within close (low) orbiting satellite parameters. if a possible explanation for wobble could be tied to ion plasma interaction, that would settle that visual consideration.
the sudden stop of an inclined orbiting body, well, i'm not sure about that one. with that body travelling, say 15,000kph to stationary within moments in the case of, for example a satellite, it would surely tear itself apart due to sudden deceleration and the forces produced upon it. mind cogs are squeaking here!
regards fakedirt.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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OK, just seen some more odd "satelite" behaviour. I was just outside for a smoke, and I looked up, I see the handle to the plough, and a bit below the handle, are 4 star like objects. But they looked out of place, and then 3 of them just moved a bit and faded out. 1 is still there, I'm presuming that is actually a star, this star is 1 finger length (if I hold my arm out, and eye it up to the last star in the handle of the plough, going underneath the handle and it was the top of the diamond formation these lights had from my perspective) But what were the other 3, what did I just see, was it a coincidental satelite passover? Certainly weren't planes, planes don't dissapear. they didn't go over the whole horizon either, just moved a few inches (from my perspective) and faded out. That was most odd.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 10:41 PM
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Originally posted by Acidtastic
If only cameras were good enough to pick these things up, we could have some videos to go with the stories.


Hey Acid,

You've had over two years to get yourself a decent camera, and could have had an explanation by now, but I'll let you off the hook since you weren't sure what to look for


Whilst inexpensive video cameras tend to be good at capturing good quality footage under well lit circumstances, most will generally be poor performers in low light or when trying to capture/record dim objects.

There is another alternative, although it may only turn out slightly cheaper than buying a decent video camera:- A DSLR mounted on a tripod, with a relatively fast lens can record surprisingly faint objects when they are not moving too fast. If you keep the date/time set accurately, and capture a few stars in your image, lots of information can be gleaned from the image.

Given the geographical location of the camera, it can usually be determined if any of the tracks caught on such an image belong to satellites. I've done this myself with my own DSLRs, in the past, so I know it's possible.

A good DSLR is not cheap, but if you buy second hand (ebay is perfect for this), you can find a camera that will easily get the job done for around £200-250 (Canon 20D or 30D for example). A 50 mm 1.8 lens will work, and only cost you around £70 (new) or if you are lucky, come with the camera for an extra £20 or £30, but a wider lens (20-30mm) would work better, as long as its fast. You want no slower than f1.8 ideally.

Add a tripod (£100 for a good one, but an adequate pod can probably be found for £50-60, perhaps less - I'm not too familiar with the "cheap n cheerful" end of the tripod market), and cable release (£5 from ebay) and you're ready to start shooting. So for perhaps as little as £300-£350 (if you are thrifty), you could have a very capable setup, useful for many types of photography, not just the intended purpose,

That would be my advice, and I'd be happy to help you (or anyone else who wants to give this a go - just U2U me) get the bits you need, and tell you what to look out for (there are plenty of pitfalls).



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by Heliocentric
I just though that it was best - before a debunker stops by and proposes these accompanied lights to be NOSS - to put the facts straight.

The NOSS 1 cluster satellite program started out in 1976 and orbited in threes, so did the NOSS 2 (started in 1990), but in the NOSS 3 program (launched in 2001) there is only one satellite, so NO, there are no more satellites traveling in threes up there.

And even if they did once upon a time, the NOSS satellites orbited at a distance of 30 to 240 km to each other, so it would hardly look as if they traveled together.

So you can't pull that rabbit out of the hat every time someone sees three moving lights up in the sky. Sorry.


Whilst I'd agree that not every trio of lights should be put down to the NOSS trio, especially lately (since as far as I know there is no NOSS trio operational right now), there may be other satellite trios up there.

For the record, I saw a NOSS trio in 1999 (if memory serves - perhaps it was a year or two later. I'd have to check.), and to me they appeared close together to me. I would say less than a degree apart, but it might have been more. NOSS orbits are usually over 1000 km above earth's surface, so at that distance, 30 to 240 km, especially at the lower end of scale could look quite close together.

I certainly don't think satellites would explain all of the reports posted in this thread, but aircraft and satellites could explain many of them in my opinion It's not always easy to tell the difference in some cases, as both can share similar characteristics.



posted on Mar, 19 2012 @ 03:30 AM
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On Saturday night (just after 11pm) while sitting on the balcony, i saw what i thought be a satellite, moving in a south-westerly direction. I only spotted it moving for a brief while, and then it stopped, standing still. A few seconds later it disappeared. As i kept looking in that direction it flashed once. I got a bit exited and got out of my "camping chair" and walked to the edge of my balcony, and about 20--30 seconds later it flashed again, once.

Called my other half to come have a look, and 15 minutes later she gave up, thanks to the chill wind.

No, it wasn't a plane



posted on Mar, 19 2012 @ 10:41 AM
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I'm rather new and don't mind sharing mine and my husbands star gazing stories.

I've been watching the skies adamantly for only a few years, but I like camping and have been since I was a child. I look up to the stars and have, fairly regularly since I was a kid. My husband, however, is an adamant sky watcher. He's seen many star like objects appear suddenly and disappear. Since I met him, his belief is atheism with the likelihood that religion stems from visitation. So he looks up hoping to see one. He says he's waiting to hitch a ride, lol.

I've seen a star or satellite traversing the sky and suddenly stop. Often times, I notice they stop in front of other stars, leading me to wonder if I just witnessed two stars colliding. Since I didn't notice a brightening or obvious light effect from a collision, I lean towards it being a UFO.

Ironically, I was outside stargazing Sunday night. It was an amazingly clear night last night. I didn't see a UFO last night, though.



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