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Jack The Ripper: The Case Reviewed

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posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


Another startling classic thread on an interesting and fascinating sociopathic misadventure of a lunatic.

Oh, the lunatic would be Jack the Ripper, not you, TML.


I always preferred the dark version from the graphic novel that was made into the well thought out Johnny Depp movie.

From Hell




Picture courtesy of Wikipedia, public domain, copyright expired.
Source : Police 'copy' of the writing in Goulston Street, attached to Chief Commissioner Sir Charles Warren's report on "the circumstances of the Mitre Square murder."

"The Juwes are the men that will not be blamed for nothing.


Quote/picture is from actual crime scene and in no way is to be miscontrued as anti-Semitic based upon its usage as per the author of this post.

Were the killings anti-Semitic or something more cryptic?

Note the use of capital letters, which seems rather indiscriminate, like the person may have been illiterate, or was it code of some kind?

The killings were all ritualistic in nature as well as gruesome, and that the killer picked the women he picked was always interesting to me.

Was he motivated by conspiracy, or cover-up?

Was he acting alone, or a part of a Masonic plot?

What most people seem to forget, is that this time in the world was shortly after the ending of the Civil War in America, and the building up to WWI in Europe.

A war does not just happen all of a sudden, there is a massive build up to it, it happens over at minimum two to three decades, sometimes it takes up to four decades, because there are wealthy industrialists who are moving money behind the scenes, forging alliances with Governments right before the war actually escalates to the point of the actual declaration of war.

So, the timing to me is suspect in that the nature of the killings of Jack the Ripper coincide with the build up of WWI, near the turn of the century, as well as mankind itself turning to new and different historical context.

People often forget that during the build up of war, people are traveling more so, some fleeing their homeland strife, some looking for a new life, and some acting as spies of their country upon another country.

So, was Jack the Ripper only motivated by killing, ritualistic in nature, or was he covering his tracks from indiscriminate talk?

One must look back to the year 1888 to see the kinds of things influencing that year, as well as the years just prior to that time.

Jack the Ripper : The Final Solution is an interesting conspiracy theory, based around royal bloodlines, Freemasonry involvement, and cover-ups.




Picture courtesy of Wikipedia, public domain, copyright expired.
Source : Jack the Ripper : Wanted Poster : Wikipedia


I felt it was my responsibility to make sure and make note of not having allegiance to any anti-Semitic group, because of that one picture/quote above.

I hate no nationality, race, or ethnicity.

Just for the Hell of it, note the sarcasm there, please, I went to Yahoo and typed in the keywords Jack the Ripper, and found there is a video game where you can become the famous sociopath.

Jack the Ripper : Addicting Games

Personally, while I play some seriously graphic and gruesome video games, this will not be one I ever care to try.

I also found the Jack the Ripper Casebook

I have several books on the topic of the notorius sociopathic killer, but due to time constraints do not have the proper time to go into it here and now.

Did you know that the F.B.I. did a criminal profile of Jack the Ripper in 1988?

F.B.I. Profile : Jack the Ripper

I found that while perusing a website I frequent. It's only eight pages, but interesting nonetheless.


[edit on 23-7-2009 by SpartanKingLeonidas]




posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 09:14 AM
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I have read almost all of your "case in review" threads and have found all of them interesting!



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


Wow! Thank you for this excellent addition my friend
That is awesome. I appreciate your support and everyone elses as well!

_______________________________________________________

To: EVERYONE

Thank you all for adding awesome information and thank you all for being so kind as well.



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 10:51 AM
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Just Found some cool videos, wish I found these before hand, their really good :











ENJOY!



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


I have to say that I do not feel I added much content, so much as I added a different angle.

I always, and I do mean always, look to history, especially when it comes to crucial times in our world.

If you do not remember history, you may be doomed to repeat it.

Historically speaking, the Jack the Ripper case was something of a quandry, as it affected society as a whole is so many ways as to cast aspersions and accusations on sociological issues of the day.

From royalty, the rule of government, to the poor, and those who walked the streets to make ends meet, there was no part of society that was not affected by "Jack."

[edit on 23-7-2009 by SpartanKingLeonidas]



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 01:04 PM
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As ever an excellent thread.

As a few people have mentioned the Alan Moore graphic novel From Hell, although fictional is an excellent point of reference due to the exhaustive research by the author.

en.wikipedia.org...

blather.net...

www.guardian.co.uk...

There seems to be a concensus on David Kelly as being an interesting case to look into too, I think there's been a bit of a stir about him on ATS recently.

Although I think the Stuart Lubbock case is quite interesting, but might present that one myself if I ever get time...

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by jokei
 


I definatley will probably do those in the next upcoming series. I will have to look at that book (graphic novel). Anything with Jack the Ripper is always (usually) a good investment and a good read.



posted on Jul, 23 2009 @ 10:11 PM
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posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 
Hm,that map is interesting,Myth I do love the JTR casebook site it's great place to get all the most recent findings in the case.Looking at the map it strikes me that Whitechapel was not the slum that was depicted in the many fictional and non-fictional accounts about the Ripper.Also,as a point of interest to my fellow posters here on this thread a Sherlock Holmes novel came out recently called Dust and Shadow by Lyndsay Faye.Holmes vs.The Ripper good read and even better research I will say it's no From Hell but it's a great book.



[edit on 123131p://4726 by mike dangerously]



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


Looking at that map and according to what the casebook says about the neighborhoods, it is suggestive that the possibility of the crimes were committed in all the different types of neighborhoods.

Meaning, it affected the lower class as well as the upper class, and everyone inbetween.

Is there a reason for that type of spanning to different neighborhoods, or is it that he was comfortable going into all of those sorts of neighborhoods?

This could be that the elusive man was someone that could fit into almost anywhere, or he was already a common figure in those neighborhoods, or even possibly both.

Was Jack the Ripper a man walking alone in these neighborhoods, some rougher than others, which means he could take care of himself physically?

Or, was he riding around in a coach with a driver like the version of the Johnny Depp movie, "From Hell"?



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 10:34 AM
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reply to post by mike dangerously
 


Wow, I have another book to read now..lol.. Again, I thought the map was pretty interesting for everything you said. Why is it depicted as such slums, when their were upper class folks in their? Or maybe they just owned the homes? Good questions mate.



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by SpartanKingLeonidas
 


Could a barber work out maybe? Did barbers make house calls back then? If so I think that would be pretty useful. Again good questions you bring up as well.



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


I do not believe barbers made housecalls.

What I was referring to though, is that the person who did these gastly murders was someone who was either known in these areas, and was seen everyday, a non-threatening person.

Or, it was someone who was unknown, and because of their traveling through these areas was not someone seen as a threat.

Yes, I realiaze that both of those are vague, but the case itself is vague.

Not the details, mind you, but the perpetrator himself.



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 02:27 PM
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Originally posted by TheMythLives
reply to post by Nola213
 


I've never heard of a bodyguard as the killer, that is interesting. The only Prince I know that they looked into was:


Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward (known as "Eddy" to his friends) is one of the most famous suspects in the Jack the Ripper case, figuring in no less than three major theories. Over the years, different versions of his personality, mental stability, and manner of death have appeared.
Prince

Was that who you are thinking about? Also I am going to read that book..lol.. I have like 50 books to read now.


Yes, Prince Albert. I remeberedf it today as soon as I woke up. The aouthor makes a very strong case for him and his I said bodyguard, but more like Royal guards mainly one a sadistic large man as being the most likely suspect.

The book even leaves the theory out there that Prince Alberts lover, escaped, baby and all.

In essence the ripper murders were a smokescreen to cover up one key witness to this adulteress affair of Alberts that resulted in a pregnancy. It was the first I'd heard of this theory, and I couldn't put the book down.

The author had access to much original crime scene evidence including photos, and police repots ect. theres also ghastly photos in the book as well of some of the crime scenes.

Anyhow I'm a huge reader of True life Crime books, but I don't have good reading retention. Oddly I can see a movie once, and remember many of the lines.

I'd love for you to do a case study in the Jon Benet Ramsey murder, as I've read 3 full books on that one. All from different pov's. One written by the head boulder policeman, who quit, Tom something I believe (who was sure the parents were guilty). Another written by people of the Boulder D.A's office, who had a more wait and see attitute. The third was a book co authored by the parents, well at least overseen by them (the writing), thiss was the most heart wrenching of them all as it included many , many intimate photos of J.B. when she was alive. What a beautiful little girl, killed in such a viscous way.

I won't go too into my feelings on that case , well just in the event you do a case study on it. But I believe the rush to judgement on the parents was a horrible thing. I also find the ransom note to be a fascinating piece of evidence. What an odd murder, a kidnapping gone wrong maybe? Who knows maybe one day someone will come forward with the truth.

I thought we had it with,what was that guyd name? was it John Carr?(probably am way off on he name) comeing forward. But alas they let him go rather quickly in my opnion as a suspect, but oh well. It is the most interesting case to me because it happened during my early teens, so I remember it vividly.

Again great thread, and keep the Case reviews comeing I love them, and I love fresh ideas you bring to the older cases.




posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 03:19 PM
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Originally posted by TheMythLives
Wow, I have another book to read now..lol.. Again, I thought the map was pretty interesting for everything you said. Why is it depicted as such slums, when their were upper class folks in their? Or maybe they just owned the homes? Good questions mate.


The good homes were on the main thoroughfares, the Whitechapel Road for example. On the streets off you have business fronts, then everything in between is slums formed in small courtyards. It was a rabbit warren literally. In each of the courts you would generally have a water closet and a slaughterhouse, shared by 10, 20 or even 30 householders, most lived in single room, and there was usually a public house fronting the street (the courts would have been behind accessed via small allies).

Either way the good houses, were not usually owned by rich people but by successful business owners and they would have probably, by the turn of the century been multiple occupancy, divided into flats, they were mostly as I recall Georgian townhouses, but by the time of Jack were well past their glory days. Most of that area is gone now, what wasn't flattened by the war time bombings (it is close to dockland and therefore was targeted) was levelled in the slum clearances in the late forties through to the fifties.

It was as dark and dingy as depicted in most dramatisations. The street lighting was gas powered and poor, most lived there because you could get a bed for the night cheaply and the public houses sold cheap (watered down) beer. Apart from Jack, there was a significant amount of crime, robberies, murders etc but nothing like Jack. The very reason that the carriage was noticed on the streets is because at that time of night it was a rarity, and it would have been assumed that the driver was lost, carrying a doctor on an emergency. You don't pass through Whitechapel to get to anywhere else nicer if you know what I mean.

If you're a reader, Dickens paints very accurate portraits of life in the Victorian era, and though he writes much earlier (end of the 18th century), Henry Fielding is a favourite of mine, he gets down to the really seedy unbelly of London
Otherwise, the poverty studies of Seebohm Rowntree conducted from the early 1900s through to the slum clearances are fascinating. In a case like Jack the Ripper you are seeing as much an act of violence as you are a clash of social mores. Those women were offensive to him on numerous levels, which is why I think he is someone who rose out of that enviroment, rather than someone who was born to priviledge.

Either way, another well composed thread. You have my continuing admiration



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by Nola213
 





I'd love for you to do a case study in the Jon Benet Ramsey murder, as I've read 3 full books on that one. All from different pov's. One written by the head boulder policeman, who quit, Tom something I believe (who was sure the parents were guilty). Another written by people of the Boulder D.A's office, who had a more wait and see attitute. The third was a book co authored by the parents, well at least overseen by them (the writing), thiss was the most heart wrenching of them all as it included many , many intimate photos of J.B. when she was alive. What a beautiful little girl, killed in such a viscous way.


That might be a little touchy, I mean a child was killed. But none the less its necessary of a case review. So that will be in the next series
Right after The Torso Killer and Martin Luther King Jr. But yes, I do have my own conclusions to that case already and so far I haven't been proven wrong. So my friend looks like you have a case review on the way



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 03:25 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 


Thank you for explaining that complicated mess...lol.. I appreciate that. I also appreciate your support as well. So who do you think the killer was? You have some damn good ideas and I am interested to hear what your opinions are



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 03:36 PM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 


I don't really have anyone that I favour over another, I would dismiss the Prince and the Queen's physician for the reasons I have stated, but beyond that there is not enough information to go on...IMO. The fact that they stopped as abruptly as they did though, I would guess that the guy either died, was incarcerated or left the country. Given the frenzied way in which he killed and mutilated the bodies he wouldn't have stopped unless he had to, he was enjoying himself far too much. Though some serial offenders have been known to burn themselves out (Green River Killer) or resolve their 'issues' through killing/rape (Albert DeSalvo), they seldom stop altogether, BTK is perhaps the only exception to that rule. That I know of.



posted on Jul, 24 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 


True, I have never really looked into BTK, but I was surprised he turned himself in though. The Ripper could have been anyone and his motives could have been anything.



posted on Jul, 25 2009 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by TheMythLives
 
Myth,Leonidas I have a theory: Jack either had access to the sewer tunnels underneath Whitechappel which would require him or they to have approval from up on high(IE royal approval) or he had the ability to melt into any crowd because he looked so ordinary,imagine this Jack just got through with one of his victims and he's just a face in the crowd watching the cops, just eating up the attention and fear the mere mention of his name gives to the entire city.If it was a group they all fitted in with the various neighbor hoods that the killings took place in and they simply meet at pub or go into those tunnels under the city and escape.



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