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All parents to sign 'behaviour contracts'

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posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:19 PM
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All parents to sign 'behaviour contracts'


www.telegraph.co.uk

Pupils and their families will be required to agree to the deal - setting out minimum standards of behaviour and attendance - before the start of term. Contracts, known as Home School Agreements, will also establish parents' responsibilities for the first time.
They face court action and possible fines of up to £1,000 for repeatedly breaking rules.
The contracts will become compulsory in all English state schools under plans laid out in a Government White Paper.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.dailymail.co.uk




posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:19 PM
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In the UK many parents have signed informal home school agreements. This does little but explain what is expected of the parents and pupils.
I believe that parent should be responsible for their children, but how can a parent enforce good behaviour in class?

The article goes on to explain that good parents will have an opportunity to complain about other parents who aren't following the agreement. So we have parents policing other parents.

Wouldn't it better if teachers could take care of discipline in school and parents out of school?


www.telegraph.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:31 PM
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Why do governments feel they can just make legislations to modify our behavior? I think that it is not their place to force agreements like this. Obviously something must be done about unruly children, but laws will not make unruly children go away, it will just create more difficult problems.

My brother met a girl in Australia, who was from England. After a year of long distance relationship travelling back and forth, he married her and lives in England. I told him (being older brother and all) that it was a bad idea to be in England. Things are not going right, there. I live in Canada. No offense to our atlantic brothers, but my country is better. They are thinking about leaving England to come to Canada. Much better place to raise a child. There is so much room here. And no cameras watching your every move. There is too much space here.

My thoughts are with you in England. Hopefully some sort of change will happen that will not make your country a police state.

[edit on 22-7-2009 by Le Colonel]



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by lightchild
 


My family and I have lived in several states across the U.S.. I have had to sign a parent contract in every school that my children have attended.


CX

posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:38 PM
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Me too, i've had to sign an agreement for both the primary school and the secondary school my daughters are about to attend

I think it's good. Then again my kids not only behave at school, but they know what the consequences will be if they get into too much trouble at school.

I agree though, i can't be entirely responsible for thier behaviour at school, but i expect my kids to be, and also the teachers too.

If my kids misbehave, i expect the teachers to discipline them as much is allowed.

CX.

[edit on 22/7/09 by CX]



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:49 PM
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The British government still seems to think that the general population is paying attention to their latest set of behavior rules.

Their continued domination of the first world violence statistics remains assured.

What was their last stroke of behavior modification genius - the ASBO or something similar.

You don't have to look far for the reason that the UK is frowned upon even within Europe, it's almost as if John Lennon is in charge.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 02:52 PM
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This is complete and utter b....x. Now don't get me wrong, parents need to keep a tight hold on their kids behaviour.

Just today for instance I took my youngest to a climbing wall, there was a woman there with 3 kids, 2 girls and a boy. The little boy was hitting one of his sisters with a strap (not hard), his mother said "Thomas stop that" little Thomas just smiled at mummy and continued, once again she told him to stop, he didn't, she threatened to take him out of the climb area, he smiled and carried on hitting his sister. In the end the mother shook her head and looked at her feet.

HELLO!!!!!!! get off you fat arse and go grab that little scroat give him a slap over the arse and don't let him climb!!!!! Problem solved, oh wait a minute, that's right. The GOVERNMENT has taken AWAY our ability to punish our kids by smacking (no, I'm not talking about knocking 9 bells of sh..e out of the kids), the same government that also took away teachers powers to punish kids and now of course the kids know it, teachers aren't even aloud to raise their voices at the poor little dears because it might mentally scar them.

So what have we got now? A country going to rat s..t, knife crime and murder, muggings etc up and the government is now trying every hare brain left wing cack minded idea (like getting parents to sign a form) in the HOPE that it will make thing better.

We need to wake and hand the power back to the parents and teachers.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


Thank you for your replies

CX and Aislin

Agreements and contracts have been around in the UK for a few years and I agree with them.

But the ones you have signed, were they enforceable by law?
Could you go to court for breaking them and in extreme cases jail!

As yeebsy has stated in a later post it's very difficult for parents and nearly impossible for teachers to punish children.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by Le Colonel
 


I think many British people agree with you.
But how long before you follow suit?



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by Aislin
reply to post by lightchild
 


My family and I have lived in several states across the U.S.. I have had to sign a parent contract in every school that my children have attended.



Here in Fulton County GA, we have to sign that we understand what the law states is expected of parents and what parents can be held liable for.

This isn't an agreement so much as their way of making sure we know what the law is.


CX

posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 03:42 PM
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Originally posted by lightchild
reply to post by CX
 


Thank you for your replies

CX and Aislin

Agreements and contracts have been around in the UK for a few years and I agree with them.

But the ones you have signed, were they enforceable by law?
Could you go to court for breaking them and in extreme cases jail!



No you are right, these were just ones drawn up by the school, between themselves and the parents.

CX.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 03:58 PM
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I haven't heard of this before. We live in Kansas.

I think it is a pretty good idea, but I think that teachers should be able to be the one to discipline in the classroom. Im not saying abuse of any kind..


Just be able to take control of some of the more disruptive kids. Let the kids know that they mean business.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by lightchild
 


Wow another attempt by the school systems and the government to put all the pressure of correct education on the parents. This is just ridiculous.

I mean mind you a parent is responsible for his child. If you're child acts out in class or has behaviour problems from a young age, that's just a result of the environment that child is in.

But it's the schools responsibility to make learning fun and interesting for the children that attend. I can't control my child while he's in a class, all I can do is make sure that I've taught him how to properly behave in social settings.

Fine and courts? Well I guess we see whose the big brother nation now eh?

V for Vendetta anyone?

~Keeper



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by yeebsy
The GOVERNMENT has taken AWAY our ability to punish our kids by smacking (no, I'm not talking about knocking 9 bells of sh..e out of the kids), the same government that also took away teachers powers to punish kids and now of course the kids know it, teachers aren't even aloud to raise their voices at the poor little dears because it might mentally scar them.


None of the above is true, however.

You are allowed to smack your kids and teachers can do quite a bit to control unruly pupils in their care. If someone "banned" shouting at kids in schools, then they obviously didn't tell that to the schools round where I live.

This contract is the right idea. All to often, you hear the parents of "unruly" children shirking responsibility, shrugging their shoulders and saying "what can I do?". Now there is a strong legal recourse for those parents to be taken to task for what amounts to a dismal display of childrearing.


posted by lightchild
how can a parent enforce good behaviour in class?


Oh, there are ways and means to ensure that your child behaves, trust me. Don't forget, this contract is a two way deal, the school must also play its part and live up to its obligations as well. If not, then they too can face legal action from parents.

EDIT: Here is what is expected in a Home School Agreement, as set out by Law:



Sections 110 and 111 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 set out that:

* All maintained schools, city technology colleges and city colleges for the technology of the arts adopt a home-school agreement and associated parental declaration

* A home-school agreement is a statement explaining: the school's aims and values; the school's responsibilities towards its pupils who are of compulsory school age; the responsibilities of the pupil's parents; and what the school expects of its pupils

* Before adopting or revising the home-school agreement, the governing body must consult all registered parents of pupils at the school who are of compulsory school age

* The governing body must take reasonable steps to ensure that all registered parents of pupils of compulsory school age sign the parental declaration to indicate that they understand and accept the contents of the agreement

* The governing body is not required to seek the signature of a parent where they consider that there are special circumstances relating to the parent or pupil in question that would make it inappropriate to do so

* The governing body may also invite any pupil, whom they consider to have a sufficient understanding of the home-school agreement as it relates to him or her, to sign the parental declaration as an indication that he or she acknowledges and accepts the school's expectations of its pupils

* The governing body must review the agreement from time to time

* In carrying out their responsibilities in relation to home-school agreements, governing bodies must have regard to any guidance issued by the Secretary of State

* The Secretary of State may prohibit the inclusion of certain forms of words, or words which have a particular effect in home-school agreements or parental declarations

* Breaches of the terms of the agreement will not be actionable through the courts

* A child must not be excluded from school, nor should a child and/or his or her parents suffer any other adverse consequences on account of his or her parents' failure or refusal to sign the parental declaration

* The governing body or the LEA, where it is the admissions authority for the school, must not:

o invite a parent or child to sign the parental declaration before the child has been admitted to the school

o make the signing of the parental declaration a condition of the child's admission to the school

o base a decision as to whether to admit a child to the school on whether his or her parents are or are not likely to sign the parental declaration

Home School Agreements



[edit on 22/7/09 by stumason]



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 04:55 PM
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But part of the problem is that the schools don't keep to their side.
In many cases the schools shirk their responsibility because they are too afraid to act or have their hands tied because of the LEA.

I have worked in schools, so I have seen it all first hand.

Interesting reading

Frank Chalk



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 05:09 PM
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None of the above is true, however. You are allowed to smack your kids


Define a smack? When I got a smack it would leave a red mark, as I've said I'm not talking about battering a kid to an inch of his/her life, but a hard enough smack to cause short term pain.




and teachers can do quite a bit to control unruly pupils in their care.


Please enlighten me: send them to the head teacher? detention for half an hour after school?




The law has recently changed and now says that any parent who smacks their child sufficiently enough to leave marks or bruises could face up to five years imprisonment on a charge of assault. There is of course no way of clearly defining the proper level of chastisement when it comes to individual parents; all parents have different ways of bringing their children up and the law has to reflect this. However a light smack to the back of the legs is acceptable and many say this is the best way to discipline their child; a light smack issued with a stern warning. The law is very clear however that any smack or punishment that leaves clear marks, welts, bruises or scratches has gone beyond what is reasonably acceptable and is a prosecutable offence. These new laws came into effect in November 2004


www.lawandparents.co.uk...

Believe me, around here the teachers are NOT aloud to shout at the pupils as it can be construed as emotional bullying, take it from me I'm a parent governor and have been through a case where a teacher was suspended.




As a parent you have the legal and moral obligation to ensure that your child is both looked after and not making a nuisance of themselves when it comes to others. Many parents feel that by shouting at their child they are making sufficient strides to ensure their behavior. However this is not always the case and in some instances can be considered to be emotional bullying especially if reported to the relevant authorities.






Oh, there are ways and means to ensure that your child behaves, trust me.




Of course there is, teaching your kids to respect others and treat others as you would expect to be treated, but now and again kids need steering in the right direction and now and again a firmer hand has to be used.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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Myself and my eldest 2 girls(11 and 13) have had to sign these.
It's just the schools way of putting across their rules of acceptable behaviour and expectations of a pupil at their school.You're not signing a death warrant.I think having these sorts of 'agreements' in place is positive in the majority of cases.

I like to think i've brought my children up well.They realise what is being asked of them and they are not stupid,we've had many conversations about how schools work and i must admit,i often refer to schools as preparation facilities
,they understand where i'm coming from there too.There eyes are very open for their ages,they just like the social aspects of school and prefer to be there at this point.

My youngest daughter is homeschooled.A totally different kettle of fish.
She has Autism and is currently exceeding everyones wildest expectations in such a blatant way as to compell our education officer to say she's "better off at home"

Still ROFL about that one......

If i thought the school wasn't keeping to the agreement,or if my child was acting up through sheer boredom.....i know where my children would be.


Oh,and i don't smack my kids.
Why would i need to?I'm far more cunning than that.
Do you have any idea what turmoil a computer/hair straightener/mobile phone/ipod ban can do to a 13yr old girl!



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 05:26 PM
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I feel this comment is border line big brother. Wouldn't take much to dob one or both parents in. Just to make there lives a misery, get back at someone for a petty grevince...



Ministers suggested that "good" parents would be able to complain about other mothers and fathers who fail to ensure their children behave.



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by greenfruit
 


Unlikely i would've thought.

Evidence would be vital to back-up a complaint.If a couple of parents came forward complaining about a child that was disruptive etc and was effecting their childs day at school(and thus their education),the child in question would have to be given a 'fair trial' as it were.If a couple of parents could just terminate a childs placement at a school on rumour.....Well!it would be a falliable system that would fall in the first week!And imagine the lawsuits!
An unlikely scenario in my mind.

And yes,if a child was having a very disruptive effect on one of my childrens educations,i'd complain



posted on Jul, 22 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by tothetenthpower
 


When I was a child it wasn't the schools responsibility to make learning fun and interesting, it was their job to teach. Teachers were teachers back then, not paid entertainment. It was our job to learn and if we didn't there were consequences.

If I've been a good parent, my child won't be acting like an idiot in class because they know there are consequences for lousy behavior. It IS my job as a parent to make sure my child is well behaved in class and doesn't distract the other children from learning. If I've taught my child to respect the school, the teachers and their fellow classmates, they will. If they don't it reflects on my poor parenting choices.


[edit on 22-7-2009 by Sundancer]




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