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Iranians Revolt - Latest News

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posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:44 PM
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Over 1 million in the streets today protesting. Men, women and children of all ages. I wish the Iranian people luck, this does not look like its going to fizzle out. The people have had enough. Here are some pictures and comments from todays protests, 6/18. They can stop the MSM from covering it but they can't stop the people from taking pictures and video.

www.ireport.com...




posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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Those riot police have awesome uniforms. Though it must be nearly unbearable to be wearing that many heavy black layers in that heat. Then to have to chase people around in it? Ugh.








posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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Just saw this on Twitter and thought I'd add it for those that want to participate.


MOUSAVI ASK THE WORLD TO PARTICIPATE IN SEA OF GREEN IN IN ALL CAPITAL CITIES THIS SUNDAY - #Iranelection - confirmed RT43 minutes ago from web


Twitter

It will be interesting to see how many people, around the world, wear green this Sunday and also whether the MSM reports about the support.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Maya00a
 


I'll do it. Why not.
I support people world wide who want freedom.



posted on Jun, 18 2009 @ 08:45 PM
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Cant believe it,

last night I finally heard on MSM that Islamic militia are being used to quell violence in Iran.

I almost fell of my seat.

Also, confirmated that Mousavi was placed under arrest at the begining of all this.

And theyve finally started going into detail about the plain closed basij in the footage.

Its like they are 4-5 days behind Iranians have been explaining this since the begining.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 06:44 AM
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Iran's supreme leader rejects vote fraud claims




Iran's supreme leader on Friday rejected opposition claims that last week's presidential elections were rigged, describing President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's win as "definitive" and calling for an end to days of protest.


www.cnn.com...

He's finished



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 07:14 AM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 


Well that's it then. The movement will either fizzle out because they won't go against the supreme leader or it will get real bloody out on the streets.

The supreme leader has now given permission to violently crackdown on the protesters.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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reply to post by DangerDeath
 


There is no middle ground now. Either Iran overturns the Mullahs or the people back down and accept the election results. Now the violence will escalate. We have reached the "Tienanmen Square" moment.

Good Luck people of Iran, you will need some.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by pavil
 


No there is a third option. If the people back down the government MAY be a lot more careful about rigged elections in the future. They may realize "this time" they could keep it under control but next time maybe not.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by Sonya610
 


If the people of Iran back down now, the Mullahs will know they can do whatever they want without fear for losing power. Once the saddle is placed on the horse, it's no longer free. The Mullahs are getting ready to put the saddle and bit back on.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 10:01 AM
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There is obvious mass discontent in Iran. But it's somewhat simplistic to think the solution is overthrowing the clerical regime and everyone is set free.

For one thing, the military in Iran is autonomous and the ones who control the weapons and intelligence. Right now they are well paid for their services by the centralized government. Until they become discontent or are made a better offer, they are loyal.

If there is a radical change of power, they are best positioned to enact it.

The mass discontent is a spontaneous reaction and we don't know if there is any organization, leadership, direction. It appears not.

There is an internal power struggle among the Ayatollahs with the Khameini/Ahmadinejad axis seen as failing and counterproductive. What may have happened is this K/A have decided to override the checks and balances of the governing bodies and have the military backing.

Mousavi has an alliance with Ayatollah Khatami, and this may be an attempted coup with the disenchanted people behind them, with the hope that the military will come to their side. They have a history and have demonstrated an ability to manage the country in better times.

So your basic internal power struggle is going on with most of us having little knowledge of what's really happening behind the scenes. The public will only find out after it's happened.


Mike



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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ANyone hear the Ayotollahs speech today?

Sounds like the UK is his favourite enemy at the momement...even bigger enemy than US and Israel!!!

Tut tut Gordon,what HAVE you been up to...Who knows.He called the UK gov the "most treacherous."

We know that Grand ayotollah...try bloody living here...(joking?)
But at least Gordon doesn't send out gangs of thugs who shoot and beat women.Unlike you and Mahmoud.
Some more footage here via Liveleak,significant because this is in a different city.

www.liveleak.com...

More rampant police state oppresion.
Also in todays speech the ayotollah gave a stern warning to the protesters to stop the unrest...so if they go out on the streets tonight it could be even more bloody than what we have seen already.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by mmiichael
 


I totally agree with your points. The Army and more importantly the Revolutionary Guards are the tipping points of the whole thing. Without their support, nothing changes.

There is undoubtedly fractures in the Mullah camp, with some expressing doubt of the Supreme Leader and he choice for President. It will be hard, if not impossible for them to change without looking weak and ineffective and falling from power. They are caught between a rock and a hard spot.

Also, the people in the streets are not organized enough to make the impact they could be making. They have the "people power" to do far more than what they have done so far. All they are doing so far is irritating the Mullahs, where they have the capability to make the Mullahs fear them.

Iran is approaching it's fork in the road and right now no one side is really steering the car.

60% of Iran's population is under 30, they have not know any other form of government. I think this is more of a generational power struggle more than anything.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by pavil
The Army and more importantly the Revolutionary Guards are the tipping points of the whole thing. Without their support, nothing changes.

There is undoubtedly fractures in the Mullah camp, with some expressing doubt of the Supreme Leader and he choice for President. It will be hard, if not impossible for them to change without looking weak and ineffective and falling from power. They are caught between a rock and a hard spot.

Also, the people in the streets are not organized enough to make the impact they could be making. They have the "people power" to do far more than what they have done so far. All they are doing so far is irritating the Mullahs, where they have the capability to make the Mullahs fear them.

Iran is approaching it's fork in the road and right now no one side is really steering the car.

60% of Iran's population is under 30, they have not know any other form of government. I think this is more of a generational power struggle more than anything.



Very good point. This is a generational shift. Unlike any time in Iranian history, with the Internet becoming widely available in the last decade, there is outside news of Iran filtering into the country that counters the state run press and broadcast versions of events.

Young Iranians have become increasingly aware of their government's policies and activities outside the country and how they have alienated themselves on the world stage. The stories of strife and economic disparity for the Iranian people caused by persecution from the US, Israel, and the West in general, don't wash any more.

Not that long ago only a small percentage of Iranians were aware of other ways of life and how governments operate. Now that knowledge is spreading. Criticism is on the lips of millions who now see their leaders not so much as benign paternal figures, but as corrupt individuals who exploit them and deprive them of natural freedoms and opportunities.

Iran is potentially a prosperous country, but the economy continues to spiral down as foreign adventurism, support of non-aligned political groups, nuclear build up, all continue to take revenues out of the national coffers.

The Islamic Revolution has not benefited the common man in any tangible way. People are angry. Particularly the young who never asked to be part of it.

Mike



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by mmiichael
 


Agreed. A more important figure than Khatami is Rafsandjani. The big struggle might be between him and Khameini.
I think it's safe now to say there is some kind of external influence too.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by Manouche
A more important figure than Khatami is Rafsandjani. The big struggle might be between him and Khameini.
I think it's safe now to say there is some kind of external influence too.



Agreed. I have mentioned Rafsanjani, maybe elsewhere. as one of the key figures - if not the main one. He is resented by this peers, maybe most by Khameini, who is more committed to the Islamic Revolution, and less to pragmatic domestic affairs, particularly the troubled economy. At least that's my take on it.

I think most of the leading elite see the country on a collision course, with the oil revenues not paying the way, and the possibilities of attack by the US and/or Israel.

While many gravitate to the view that the rifts are caused by outside influences, usually the US or Russia, I see these more as result of major jockeying to back a new winner in the internal power struggle. If change is coming, they want to be in on the ground floor.

There are international arms dealers hoping to see a reason for vast amounts of new weaponry being bought, also offering their support to whoever looks like the best customer.

The people in power want most of all to remain there. If there are outside offers they think will help them maintain or enhance their positions, they will take them.

Power seekers often find themselves with strange bedfellows.

Mike







[edit on 19-6-2009 by mmiichael]



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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I say good for the people.




Protesters in Iran tell the world about their fight for democracy as restrictions on mobile phones and the internet are defied on Twitter



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by mmiichael

Very good point. This is a generational shift. Unlike any time in Iranian history, with the Internet becoming widely available in the last decade, there is outside news of Iran filtering into the country that counters the state run press and broadcast versions of events.

Young Iranians have become increasingly aware of their government's policies and activities outside the country and how they have alienated themselves on the world stage. The stories of strife and economic disparity for the Iranian people caused by persecution from the US, Israel, and the West in general, don't wash any more.




Hey Mike

Actually it has happened before. History may be repeating itself. In 1979 the "Revolution" really started and took hold with the young college student at Tehran University and they were well aware of what the then Government of Iran was doing. That revolution was lead by the young intellectuals. They didn't have the Internet but they didn't need it. Iran was a pretty modern place even by 1970s standards.

Source

Start of demonstrations in late 1977

The first militant anti-Shah demonstrations were in October 1977, after the death of Khomeini's son Mostafa.[80] Khomeini's activists numbered "perhaps a few hundred in total", but over the coming months they grew to a mass of several thousand demonstrators in most cities of Iran.[81]

The first casualties suffered in major demonstrations against the Shah came in January 1978. Hundreds of Islamist students and religious leaders in the city of Qom were furious over a story in the government-controlled press they felt was libelous. The army was sent in, dispersing the demonstrations and killing several students (two to nine according to the government, 70 or more according to the opposition)




Not that long ago only a small percentage of Iranians were aware of other ways of life and how governments operate. Now that knowledge is spreading. Criticism is on the lips of millions who now see their leaders not so much as benign paternal figures, but as corrupt individuals who exploit them and deprive them of natural freedoms and opportunities.




According to the Shi'ite customs, memorial services (called Arba'een) are held forty days after a person's death. In mosques across the nation, calls were made to honour the dead students. Thus on February 18 groups in a number of cities marched to honour the fallen and protest against the rule of the Shah. This time, violence erupted in Tabriz, where five hundred demonstrators were killed according to the opposition, ten according to the government. The cycle repeated itself, and on March 29, a new round of protests began across the nation. Luxury hotels, cinemas, banks, government offices, and other symbols of the Shah regime were destroyed; again security forces intervened, killing many. On May 10 the same occurred.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:19 PM
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The glove has been slapped... urgh... the glove slapped the faces of millions...

Now the Supreme Authority will be beheaded... er... dethroned...

Who the hell they think they are? The little wizards from Oz. Like never in history people killed their masters...

Happens all the time and in a repeating pattern. They never learn. They never try to learn. They are emotion and idea driven, have no mind of their own, no conscience, no ethics, no compassion, no human characteristics at all.

They are the true AI - just a program. They run til there is juice.



posted on Jun, 19 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by DangerDeath
The glove has been slapped... urgh... the glove slapped the faces of millions...

Now the Supreme Authority will be beheaded... er... dethroned...

Who the hell they think they are? The little wizards from Oz. Like never in history people killed their masters...

Happens all the time and in a repeating pattern. They never learn. They never try to learn. They are emotion and idea driven, have no mind of their own, no conscience, no ethics, no compassion, no human characteristics at all.



That's what they said 30 years ago when they got rid of the Shah. That's what they always say.

Are you sure the next guy will be noble and just? That peace, love, and brotherhood will reign throughout the kingdom?

Life tends to be a lot different from fantasy fiction.


Mike





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