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The Blue Lodge- More secretive than I thought

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posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 03:55 PM
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This morning I talked to my 32 degree Mason friend who lent me the book- The bridge to light. I asked him if I could visit his lodge just to see how things go before joining. He told me that that would not be possible, he said," until you are a Master Mason you would even be asked to step out of the Lodge (during initiation period)while they carry on thier rituals. I asked him how long it would take to become a Master Mason. He said that depends on how hard I work and how well I remember sayings that are handed down by word of mouth only. I was surprised, I didn't think you would encounter something of that nature right up front. It sure sounds interesting. I just might be joining that Great White Brotherhood soon. I guess the only thing that realy holds me back now is, I am usually exhausted when I get home.




posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 04:00 PM
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That's good for you. I may become a mason one day. I have heard that there iniation ritual is sometimes difficult. Masons are not as secret anymore but that lodge I would like to break in there someday Legally or not.

DISCLAIMER: I have no plans,what so ever, to break into the Mason Society illeagly. If I were to join I would work my way to the top.



posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 04:21 PM
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Heh. More secretive than you thought?
Would you expect to be able to walk into any organisation's meeting without being a member first?

The reason an apprentice mason steps out of the lodge is that somebody else is going through a stage of ritual that is more advanced. But this only occurs if there are a queue of candidates. What's the point of being able to see the ritual before you take part in it? It takes away all of the fun.

If you've only completed your first degree, why would you want to see the third degree ritual? It's a million times better to experience the ritual for yourself when you get to that stage.

Rather than being a secret, the fact that an apprentice or fellow-craft mason doesn't see the 3rd degree ritual until he undergoes it for himself could be compared to a student not being supplied with an exam paper for quantum physics when he has only studied elementary mathematics.

By the way: where did you get the words "The Great White Brotherhood"? I've never heard masonry called that here in the UK and to tell the truth I find it to be a rather crude term for various cults and mystery schools - not recognised freemasonry.

[Edited on 30-4-2004 by Leveller]



posted on Apr, 30 2004 @ 05:25 PM
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Congratulations, TgSoe, on your decision to unite with the world's oldest, largest, and most fascinating men's organization!
Once you become an Entered Apprentice, you will be allowed to sit in any Lodge when opened on the Apprentice Degree. Following your initiation, you will be apprenticed to some worthy and knowledgeable Master Mason, who will instruct you in the mysteries of the Degree. In most cases, your coach (as the instructor is called) will take you to neighboring Lodges, introduce you to local Brethren, and give you the opportunity to witness the Degree being conferred on others after you yourself have received it. As for the length of time between degrees, most Grand Lodges require a minimum of one month, which gives you time to learn the Catechism of your Degree before advancing to the next. The Brothers who interview you upon your application will answer any specific questions, as these rules vary from state to state.
You will no doubt find your initiation an experience you will never want to forget, and its beauty and meaning will only grow richer as the years go by. Best of luck on your Masonic journey, keep us updated.

Fiat Lvx.



Originally posted by TgSoe
This morning I talked to my 32 degree Mason friend who lent me the book- The bridge to light. I asked him if I could visit his lodge just to see how things go before joining. He told me that that would not be possible, he said," until you are a Master Mason you would even be asked to step out of the Lodge (during initiation period)while they carry on thier rituals. I asked him how long it would take to become a Master Mason. He said that depends on how hard I work and how well I remember sayings that are handed down by word of mouth only. I was surprised, I didn't think you would encounter something of that nature right up front. It sure sounds interesting. I just might be joining that Great White Brotherhood soon. I guess the only thing that realy holds me back now is, I am usually exhausted when I get home.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 06:36 AM
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Originally posted by Leveller
By the way: where did you get the words "The Great White Brotherhood"?
[Edited on 30-4-2004 by Leveller]


I read about the "Great White Brotherhood in the book Masonary Beyond The Light by William Shnobelen. I think its kind of an ancient term that predates the Templars.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 06:48 AM
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The real secrets must begin at the 33rd degree. I noticed that neither Morals and Dogma are the Bridge to light have anything in them about the 33rd degree. I suppose that is where the ice really starts to melt.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 07:18 AM
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What happened here....an initiation gone wrong?!! Kinda hard to trust an organization that uses that kind of fear as a rite of passage.JMO



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by Oleander
What happened here....an initiation gone wrong?!! Kinda hard to trust an organization that uses that kind of fear as a rite of passage.JMO

This incident has been discussed many times.
I have my questions with the Masons, but it isn't fair to judge them on this one incident.
It seems all groups can be found to have members who made mistakes. It doesn't make the group untrustworthy.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 07:56 AM
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I think it is very fair to "judge" them on that incident,kinda puts a little perspective on the inside workings of a much debated society.Mistakes,yes,we all make them,and we would also be judged if the mistake was of that magnitude.Wasn't trying to dredge up old news but it seems noteworthy to include the good and the bad when making a decision to join a group with a reputation such as theirs.I know that they do quite a bit of humanitarian works,which seems to be like an underground benafactor kind of thing because you never hear of it in the mainstream media,but when you hear of a shooting it makes them look worse than already 'imagined'...maybe they need a good PR department



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 08:54 AM
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Originally posted by TgSoe
The real secrets must begin at the 33rd degree. I noticed that neither Morals and Dogma are the Bridge to light have anything in them about the 33rd degree. I suppose that is where the ice really starts to melt.


The 33 is administrative and honorary. It does not introduce any new teachings into the Rite, but is conferred to honor members for outstanding service to the Rite, to Freemasonry in general, to the nation, or to the local community.
The Scottish Rite actually places much less emphasis on secrecy than the Blue Lodge. The Blue Lodge continues the ancient Masonic tradition of strict secrecy, but the Scottish Rite places more emphasis on academic achievement within the Rite. This is one of the reasons that the book you read, Bro. Hutchens A Bridge To Light, describes the Scottish Rite degree ceremonies in detail, and offers explanations of the ceremonies and symbols used.
Some aspects of the Rite are still secret, especially the modes of recognition, but the Scottish Rite is concerned more with Masonic, ethical, and philosophical education, than with just preserving secrecy for its own sake.

As for Oleanders question:

This has been addressed on other threads, but I will briefly recapitulate.
The ceremony in which this man was killed was not an authorized Masonic ceremony (our Masonic ceremonies were actually instituted long before guns were even invented). Instead, this ritual was an initiation into a social club that members of that Lodge had invented, called the Southside Fellow Craft Club. It consisted entirely of pranks, one of which was to place tin cans around the candidate and fire blanks, with a guy hiding behind him, knocking the cans over with a stick. The guy who was supposed to be shooting blanks also had a loaded a gun with him, and fired the wrong gun. The shooter was 82 years old, and I do not believe this was done purposefully at all.
Nevertheless, it should never have happened, and these guys were indeed acting like idiots. Those involved in the incident have had their Masonic membership suspended by the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of New York, and the Charter of the Lodge has been temporarily suspended, pending further investigation.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 09:13 AM
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Thank you Masonic light for clearing that up,it was indeed an idiotic mishap,even more idiotic when you think that these are grown men doing these stunts,whatever illusions anyone has/had of the Masons,they only succeeded in making it worse,kinda like a "bad seed makes the whole garden rotten" kinda thing.I was being diplomatic in my earlier post and was not meaning to offend anyone who enjoys the title.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by Oleander
Thank you Masonic light for clearing that up,it was indeed an idiotic mishap,even more idiotic when you think that these are grown men doing these stunts,whatever illusions anyone has/had of the Masons,they only succeeded in making it worse,kinda like a "bad seed makes the whole garden rotten" kinda thing.I was being diplomatic in my earlier post and was not meaning to offend anyone who enjoys the title.


No offense taken. I've been a Mason for years, and I find this sort of conduct extremely questionable, so I can only imagine how it appears to non-Masons.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on May, 3 2004 @ 03:35 PM
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Unfortunately this is exactly what happens when something stupid goes on from a group that not a lot of people understand. Masons conduct themselves with a certain level of secrecy which brings about suspicion from many people. That is natural. People are always suspicious of someone they think is hiding something. It's just sad that when something like that happens publicly it is through that event that most people view the group at large.



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