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OMG turbulence broght down french jet!!

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:32 PM
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Originally posted by Freeman
Thing is, if it crashed it crashed in the ocean, is it possible to survive jump to water from such altitude?

I reckon if your a hard cookie, you COULD theoreticaly survive impact into water if you jump standing/verticaly



I don't think so. I've jumped out of airplanes 200+ times, and have watched on separate occasions when two people went in, and been in a plane crash of a twin engine beech tail dragger.

1) Flight level 350 is 35,000 feet... The air temperature goes down 3 degrees for every 1000 feet you go up... If it was 70 deg F on the ground it is 35 below zero at altitude combine that with 400 mph wind speed... what would be the wind chill temperature? Good luck.

2) 1/2 of the worlds air lies below 10,000 feet You are not supposed to fly above (or is 12,500? that without pressurization or oxygen... When we would jump at 15,000 we all be feeling the altitiude (giddy) but none of us would admit it. (There was a time limit, no longer than 20 minutes or so above 10,000...but its been a few decades so sorry for not recalling the details) Oh and even on HOT summer days it is COLD.

3) In freefall head first one attains over 200 mph... Water would be a like a ROCK at 200 mph...




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Aim64C

Of course - by that same token, I don't trust a lot of the commercial aircraft - particularly the older, fatigued airframes. You've got a lot of former military people working on those birds, and they are used to the 100% materials inspection that goes along with milspec products. The civilian end of the bargain isn't 100% screened, and with the horror-stories to be told about military aviation... it doesn't make me incredibly confident with the commercial industry.



The aircraft is a relatively new one. It was delivered to air france in 2005.


The registration of the missing plane is F-GZCP. It was built and delivered to Air France in 2005.

The aircraft had made 18,870 flights and its last maintenance check in the hangar took place on 16 April 2009, according to Air France.


So, fatigue failure can be ruled out.

guardian



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by peacejet


The aircraft is a relatively new one. It was delivered to air france in 2005.


The registration of the missing plane is F-GZCP. It was built and delivered to Air France in 2005.

The aircraft had made 18,870 flights and its last maintenance check in the hangar took place on 16 April 2009, according to Air France.


So, fatigue failure can be ruled out.

guardian


With due respect, those figures do not match up.

18,870 flights over 4 years means the aircraft was flying on average of 13 times a day, assuming it was never withdrawn from service during that period.

Which means its average leg time was less than 2 hours, again assuming it was in continuous service, with no turn-around time. If you start adding in the time the aircraft was not in service (maintenance, down time et al) and turn-around time, the average leg duration drops even more.

Thats just stupid.



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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I Think they mean 18,870 flight hours which is about 2400 to 2500 flights over 4 years ( Feb 2005- Jun 2009)



posted on Jun, 2 2009 @ 02:00 PM
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just heard on the news which i missed mostly but the last bit said: there were about FIVE failures which were reported one after another



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 03:51 AM
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Originally posted by Freeman
Thing is, if it crashed it crashed in the ocean, is it possible to survive jump to water from such altitude?

I reckon if your a hard cookie, you COULD theoreticaly survive impact into water if you jump standing/verticaly


you're a dweeb. water doesn't compress, hitting water at the speed you would be falling would be like hitting concrete. next time think before posting

 
Mod Edit: Please Review the Following Link: Courtesy Is Mandatory

[edit on Thu Jun 4 2009 by Jbird]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 09:02 AM
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Originally posted by Freeman
just heard on the news which i missed mostly but the last bit said: there were about FIVE failures which were reported one after another


If the aircraft was undergoing a major failure, you would expect multiple reports - for example, an electrical bus failure will trigger its own report, and each of the systems that rely on the electrical bus failure will trigger their own reports, and then each of hte monitoring systems....

Its one of the ways to determine if the failure report is genuine or a spurious error itself.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by RichardPrice
 


All flights were long range flights. So, you can imagine the amount of time that the plane would have been up in the air.



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