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OMG turbulence broght down french jet!!

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:46 AM
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Ohhh #.

Thats what they said on the news, TURBULENCE. Aircraft entered some kind of tropical storm? And reported heavy turbulence on the way thro mid atlantic!!!

Imagine what kind of jerkings was going on that caused electrical failure!!




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:09 AM
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Actually, this seems more than a turbulence. Actually, the aircraft seems to have been flying through a storm and it seems that it was struck by lightning, causing failure of all electrical systems resulting in loss of control. But generally these aircrafts do have safety systems to handle this. But there is a limit to what the systems can handle. The lightning strike was supposed to catastrophic, maybe, it was struck by sprite lightning. Who knows? Let the investigation report come. We will get a clear picture then.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:42 AM
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Do u know if A 330 is a fly by wire aircraft?


In that case if electrical system goes - its *SNIP!* unless it got something some kind of mechanical system which can control aleron and other surfacses

Mod Edit: Profanity/Circumvention Of Censors – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 1/6/2009 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:58 AM
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yes an A330 is a fly by wire aircraft

you should post a link

news.yahoo.com...



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by Freeman
 


There is always a limit to what the systems can handle. In case a sprite lightning had struck the crew had no chance.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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Turbulence does not bring down planes.

This is for a few reasons. One, the jerking motion you feel during turbulence is generally a combination of hot air pushing the plane upwards and the pilots pushing the plane down to keep level. So when you feel one of those big releases where the plane feels like it drops 50 feet and your stomach is still on the ceiling, you're experiencing the hot air stopping while the plane was still compensating.

That being said, storms and high winds create the need for compensation and the rattling can knock something 'loose' potentially. The point I'd like to make is that the everyday turbulence you feel really isn't that dangerous, it seems a lot worse than it is. I wouldn't cite this French plane as an example of why you should fear turbulence. It is very common and does not have a history of causing plane crashes. I would say this is like friends mildly electrocuting each other (ha, not a tazer but a dog shock collar and a few competitive friends makes for an odd afternoon) and discovering one had a heart condition which didn't like the jolt. Not the best example, just trying to say don't let this be a reason to fear flying because of turbulence.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by Freeman
 
flying is awesome but I hope I never have to get on a plane again


at least we didn't have disclosure by way of a hostile ET attack...no disrespect to the victims



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:55 AM
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Coming from a small plane private pilot...
I can say turbulence will rip the wings off a small light aircraft...
Normally these bigger jets are designed to take a fare amount of turbulence but if something wasn't bolted down or a thing lose in the compartment where electrical systems are stacked then I can see a failure that would bring down a jumbo despite all the backup systems



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:01 PM
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Air France fears that flight AF447 was hit by lightning, setting off an electrical fault that could have damaged the in-flight computer systems that are a feature of Airbus aircraft and play an important role in directing the aircraft. But pilots who have been hit by lightning describe it as a spectacular but relatively harmless phenomenon. In rare cases, it has been known to tear a two-millimetre hole in aircraft fuselages without endangering the aircraft. The lightning passes around the aircraft fuselage and is then channelled off the plane and into the atmosphere by so-called "static wicks" – sticks of wire sheathed in plastic that run off the ­aeroplane. One former Airbus pilot also told the Guardian the aircraft have back-up systems designed to deal with sudden circuit or computer failures, so a single lightning strike should not cause a catastrophic electronic failure.

www.guardian.co.uk...


Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 1/6/2009 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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ACARS final report was of elecrical and pressure failure at 435kts FL350 , ACRS then stopped reporting


i would say the aircraft broke up in flight.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 12:54 PM
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Any official reports as to where it crashed yet? I would imagine it would be possible to track the jet with GPS???



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:05 PM
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Thing is, if it crashed it crashed in the ocean, is it possible to survive jump to water from such altitude?

I reckon if your a hard cookie, you COULD theoreticaly survive impact into water if you jump standing/verticaly



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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Couple of things here:

We do NOT know why the flight went down.

The A330 airframe has proven to be quite rugged. There are hundreds in service and this is the second loss and the first was in flight test.

Have you ever seen how rugged these aircraft really are?



Thats a displacement upward quite a ways before it breaks at 150% of its rated strength.

Here is one for the 777 (It displaced 24 FEET before failure
)


Untill the recover the flight recorder we simply have no idea. Whatever it was it was a rapid failure.





[edit on 6/1/09 by FredT]

[edit on 6/1/09 by FredT]



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 02:23 PM
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I bet your flight recorder is at the bottom of atlantic ocean



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 03:18 PM
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www.reuters.com...


PARIS, June 1 (Reuters) - Two Lufthansa jets passed through turbulence before and after a missing Air France plane without incident on Monday, a source with access to data said, leaving experts scrambling to assess the weather's role in the disaster.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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"Black Boxes" are designed to float, and usually have some kind of beacon attached to make recovery much easier.

Though what things are designed to do, and what they actually do can be different things.

Otherwise - I'd say the problem is that it was an airbus.....

I don't trust those planes.

Of course - by that same token, I don't trust a lot of the commercial aircraft - particularly the older, fatigued airframes. You've got a lot of former military people working on those birds, and they are used to the 100% materials inspection that goes along with milspec products. The civilian end of the bargain isn't 100% screened, and with the horror-stories to be told about military aviation... it doesn't make me incredibly confident with the commercial industry.

As for the cause - it could be anything - a mechanical fault/failure; a flight control system error (certain flight parameters can cause the system to get confused and think it is stalling when it isn't - and those programming oversights like to rear their heads at inopportune moments); or a fault in the grounding systems that are supposed to harden the plane against various electrostatic and electromagnetic problems.

Or the Chinese just tested a new ASAT weapon in a place no one would suspect.....

Or the Greys were repossessing some of the technology we loaned from them......

Pick your insanity.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 03:47 PM
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Our only hope is that the missing jet is in some form of transdimensional malfunction and passangers are sucked into another world



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by Aim64C
 


FDR and CVR can float - but not when trapped under 100 tons of wreckage



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 06:34 PM
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I kinda get a feeling something mysterious / paranormal happened to this plane



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 07:18 PM
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Originally posted by Freeman
Thing is, if it crashed it crashed in the ocean, is it possible to survive jump to water from such altitude?

I reckon if your a hard cookie, you COULD theoreticaly survive impact into water if you jump standing/verticaly


Well... probably not...
"The terminal velocity of a falling human being with arms and legs outstretched is about 120 miles per hour (192 km per hour) — slower than a lead balloon, but a good deal faster than a feather!"
"For a skydiver with parachute closed,standing/vertically the terminal velocity is about 200 km/h. or around 250 mph"
Odd fact when people in street clothes fall out of air planes the wind rips off their clothes so you'll be naked too...

average commercial jet in 80 degree weather, at 35000 feet, it is -25 up there... Air pressure is so low you cant fill your lung with enough air even if you had o2 (unpressurized mask that is)

So could you theoretically survive...sure with a lot of provisions and a hell of a lot of luck but the odds favor you being dead before you fell below the 12,000 foot mark... in cases like these its not the landing that does you in...it is the fall



edited to correct the blip my 18 month old granddaughter made when smacking the laptop



[edit on 1-6-2009 by DaddyBare]



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