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Ok so a true christian wouldnt believe in dinosaurs?

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posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by Skinon
I have always wondered this, Some christians believe the world is something like 4000 years old, no one here would believe that right?... Ok this is a question directed to devout christians, Do you believe dinosaurs existed?

The number is more like 6000 years, but very few Christians accept that figure.

God is capable of anything. God is capable of conceiving a universe that contains both theists and atheists, both good and evil, both mysticism and the scientific method. Why not both dinosaurs and human beings? What I find hilarious is the way atheists try to limit God and try to define "true Christians" to fit a narrow, Godless perception of existence — If Science exists, then God can't exist, and If dinosaurs existed, the Bible must be wrong, and nonsense such as that.

Look at it this way, if Science is all there is, then 99% of the universe doesn't exist, because Science can't prove it exists. The Speed of Light? Black Holes? Quasars? Dark Matter? All theory, a bunch of numbers on paper. About every ten years, Science is shocked to discover that their numbers don't work at all, and they have to concoct a different set of numbers to explain their total ignorance. And ten years later they'll have to do it all over again.

I have faith in the existence of God, and I'm pretty sure that dinosaurs existed, too. I have no problem with it, and I'm not living in a dream world of mathematical theory, fretting that my tenuous models of existence are going to crumble every decade or so. There are more important things in life than grieving or rejoicing over a page full of stupid numbers.


Originally posted by Skinon
But when we die we are all going to find out the answer and alot of people are gonna feel like chumps. So i guess we just gonna wait and see huh?

Ummm. Hold on. Only those who have faith in an afterlife will have the last laugh, no matter how you look at it. If there's no afterlife, then nobody is going to "feel like a chump" nor anything else, so atheists don't even get the last laugh. However, when atheists find out that there is a continuity of consciousness beyond death, they'll be pleasantly surprised to know that they're already forgiven for being dumb asses.



— Doc Velocity

[edit on 3/7/2009 by Doc Velocity]




posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 01:50 AM
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I grew up in a Roman Catholic family my mom believed in dinosaurs and the earths was billions of years old . BTW I don't consider my self roman catholic



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by Welfhard
 


How shall i put this? The scientific answer to how life evolved is a slow crawl out of primordial ooze, mud, wet dirt. The religious people believe that God created Man from the soil, it did not rain during this period, the water rose up from the earth which gives you wet dirt, mud, ooze from the beginning of time. How do i know the dirt was wet? Dry dirt does not stick together. God created a man out of that scientific ooze. You know, religion had the right answer, or at least the same answer science suggests, and they had it thousands of years before science "discovered it.



posted on Mar, 7 2009 @ 06:11 AM
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Originally posted by Doc Velocity

God is capable of anything.

I have faith in the existence of God


Are you christian? Also, could you please explain to me what form your God takes and how you came to have faith?


Originally posted by Skinon
But when we die we are all going to find out the answer and alot of people are gonna feel like chumps. So i guess we just gonna wait and see huh?

Ummm. Hold on. Only those who have faith in an afterlife will have the last laugh, no matter how you look at it. If there's no afterlife, then nobody is going to "feel like a chump" nor anything else, so atheists don't even get the last laugh. However, when atheists find out that there is a continuity of consciousness beyond death, they'll be pleasantly surprised to know that they're already forgiven for being dumb asses.



— Doc Velocity

[edit on 3/7/2009 by Doc Velocity]

yea he has got you there Skinon, you can't feel like a chump if you don't exist. Although I doubt everyone will be meeting up in the afterlife saying I told you so........

I think when you die you are dead, game over. Of course most do not want consider the most logical explanation because it doesn't sound as cool........ and they have been brainwashed by organised religion ooooooo sorry


Peace



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 01:40 AM
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Originally posted by vehemes terra eternus
Are you christian? Also, could you please explain to me what form your God takes and how you came to have faith?

Although I was raised in a Protestant family, I abandoned religion and religious thinking when my father died young — I was 17 years old at the time, and his untimely and agonizing death was a cruel blow to me. For much of my life thereafter, I was atheist/agnostic. More than that, I wasn't merely atheist, I was a God-hater, just as most professed atheists are actually God-haters.

There's a difference. A "true atheist" does not acknowledge God, does not dwell on theist matters, and does not allow theist issues to influence his life. A true atheist very, very seldom even thinks about God and religion, because those concepts are not on his radar. In all the years that I called myself an atheist, I only met a handful of true atheists — they're a rare breed, as few and far between as true, faithful Christians.

On the other hand, the great majority of professed "atheists" that I encountered were actually God-haters, like myself. God-haters ponder the many contradictions of the Bible (especially of Genesis) and spend a great deal of time angrily arguing scripture with theists. God-haters use the darkest historical data to indict all believers (for example, The Crusades, The Inquisition, and Gay Priest Scandals are among the frequently-referenced black marks against the Catholic Church). Although they attempt to use "critical thinking" to pick apart the seeming illogic of theists, God-haters most often resort to ridicule and mockery of all things theistic.

In short, God-haters spend more time dwelling on theism than do most Christians (or any other theists). If Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism and Hindi all magically disappeared tomorrow, true atheists probably wouldn't even notice; however, an absence of religion would drive God-haters mad, because attacking religion is all they know.

After some 20 years of hedonistic living and calling myself an atheist, I managed to get myself into serious, serious trouble. Without naming names and locations, suffice to say that I ended up on the run from those who would have gladly fed me to the fishes. I lived for two straight years off-the-grid, under the radar, with no paper trails, no past and no future — for all intents and purposes, I ceased to exist. Like Robinson Crusoe, I lived like a beach bum on an island in the Gulf of Mexico, never knowing where I'd find my next meal, and wondering when or if the hammer would ever come down.

It was during this time that I couldn't help but notice very peculiar twists of Fate that always seemed to work in my favor, allowing me to survive just another week or two, and always delivering me from the most dire circumstances.

And I mean very peculiar twists of Fate.

For instance, a stranger walked up to me on the beach one Sunday and addressed me directly, saying that he knew I was in trouble, he knew that I was starving, and that he wanted to lend me a hand. Warily, I followed him up the beach to the biggest hotel on the island, where he produced a monster keychain and unlocked the hotel diner. Inside, he fired up the kitchen and told me to drink whatever I wanted as he prepared a meal for me. Thoroughly parched, I drank iced tea, cola, beer and lemonade hand over fist for half an hour; then he served me a huge hamsteak with about two pounds of fries, followed by a number of cakes and pies. When I was done, the guy led me back outside, locked up the diner, put a fifty dollar bill in my hand and bade me adieu.

Before I waddled away, I asked the guy how I could repay him. He said, simply, "Do the same for someone else when you're able."

And that was the last time I laid eyes on the fellow, but it's not the end of the story. That guy's intervention in my predicament had saved my life, undoubtedly, but it also marked a drastic change in my luck (for the better) for weeks to come — the money alone fed me for nearly a month. Thereafter I was able to find day jobs around the island with relative ease, after going jobless for the better part of a year. When Christmas rolled around, I thought I'd stop by the hotel and thank the fellow who had taken an interest in my survival.

Guess what? They had never heard of the guy, didn't recognize my description of him. I explained that he had to be a former manager or something, because he unlocked the diner and served me, for petesake. The hotel manager eyed me suspiciously and said, "I do all the hiring and firing, and I'm telling you nobody like that ever worked here. Now GTFO."

Well. This weird development weighed on my mind only briefly. My optimism had returned, I was making a little bit of cash every day, and everything just seemed brighter, even though I was still basically destitute. Oddly enough, I often caught myself muttering, "Come on, I really need help right now," and then something surprising would happen, usually just exactly what I needed. It never occurred to me at the time that I was praying.

When I rotated back to the real world about a year later, I looked back on my island experiences as highly unusual — I mean, even at the worst of times, it was as if somebody or some thing was pulling strings to ensure my survival. I sure as hell wasn't soliciting charity or favors from anyone, but a whole succession of favors just fell in my lap.

Now, you can call all of that coincidence, but the experience of it told me it was something else, like some sort of intervention. Over the 16 years since then, the favors are still coming, unsolicited. I'm now very happily married, we own a big house, we have no legal or money problems, my prior troubles were mercifully erased, and I've changed into a different and more open person. More open to the miraculous, that is.

I do not believe in anything, because belief is cheap and can turn on a dime. Rather, I have Faith (an incontrovertible knowing) that something is out there that seems to function like a Conscious Universe.

I even joined the Lutheran Church (which is the original Reformed branch of the Catholic Church). This church is pretty much New Testament-focused, with all of the usual Christ died for our sins preaching and rituals; but the people are very laid back, many come from mixed Catholic and Protestant backgrounds, and most of them have experienced miraculous interventions very similar to mine. I get the distinct impression that each of them has a very personal perception of God that probably differs greatly from what is being preached, just as I do.

So... While I still wince a little at the hellfire and damnation of the Old Testament, I do recognize that it was compiled and edited from a whole smorgasbord of Middle Eastern folklore and myth that cannot be overlayed, page-for-page, with recorded historical events. The more important part of the Bible, in my opinion, is the New Testament, which contains several different accounts of and perspectives on miraculous intervention, as well as that overriding message: Do the same for someone else when you're able.

Hope that answered your questions.

— Doc Velocity



posted on Mar, 8 2009 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 


Wow Doc that was an unexpectedly awesome reply, thank you.

Those are some peculiar twists, the good samaritan part sounds too good to be true but I believe you. Did you notice anything strange about him? Did he look like a local? Wow what a legend, that is very inspirational. I am going to do something nice for someone today just because I am able.

"Come on, I really need help right now," and then something surprising would happen, usually just exactly what I needed.
Any more examples???????

Also do you have any examples of the "miraculous interventions" your fellow church goers have experienced???

Conscious Universe, I like that. Have you heard of the Global Consciousness Project? I am quite young (23) and my journey has only just begun. I have never given much thought to the metaphysical. I try to be as logical as I can be when trying to understand our existential dilemma and what you are saying does not usually factor into my thoughts.
Lately however, I have become rather curious as I hear more and more people I respect mention these 'occurrences'.

Good to hear you are back on track and thank you once again for your thoughtful and well written response.

Peace



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by debris765nju
 


How shall i put this? The scientific answer to how life evolved is a slow crawl out of primordial ooze, mud, wet dirt.


No, the current scientific answer is that it began in the large primordial oceans around the volcanic vents, not dirt.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 04:25 AM
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Edit: Double post.

[edit on 9-3-2009 by RuneSpider]



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 04:25 AM
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What I find hilarious is the way atheists try to limit God and try to define "true Christians" to fit a narrow, Godless perception of existence — If Science exists, then God can't exist, and If dinosaurs existed, the Bible must be wrong, and nonsense such as that.


In all serious, I hear Christians working along similar lines all of the time. As well as members of several other faiths.
"My God isn't like that, my God is such and such", ect.
Science is wrong, because God exists, or what have you.
Theists will openly mock atheists for their belief, and I am personally aware of the bitter discourse that comes from two different faiths that run on different wavelengths.


However, when atheists find out that there is a continuity of consciousness beyond death, they'll be pleasantly surprised to know that they're already forgiven for being dumb asses.


I know several atheists who believe in a afterlife, but not a God. Some are open to the idea of a god figure, in the sense that they feel that after death we join part of a consciousness, others believe in reincarnation without any overseeing karma.

Atheism, in and of itself, only precludes the belief in deities. Several of them are well versed in a number religions and cultures, and I've had enjoyable conversations with them in regards to faiths and religion.




Look at it this way, if Science is all there is, then 99% of the universe doesn't exist, because Science can't prove it exists.


Science isn't trying to prove anything exists, Science is trying to understand what already exists, with the possibly of understanding how it came to be, maybe even why.

As for it changing every ten years... models are adapted with new information, sure. But Einstein's theories have stood a good amount of time, as has Newton's Laws of Physics, Bernoulli's Principle, and many other scientific laws, theories, and discoveries, have lead to to everything from powered flight, computers, and modern medical car.

The universe is being studied, and yes, we don't know everything. We know somethings, and everyday we learn new things.
Those "pages of stupid numbers" you are going on about would include everything from the study of our earth, to the study of the solar system at large.
These studies, which you seem to almost gleefully trivialize, are often the work of, sometimes even the lifelong work of men and women.
Maybe the computer you are using right now seems pretty ridiculous, same for the internet you use to access this site.
But your computer includes several different fields of science: metallurgy, physics, mathematics, polymerization, ect.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 05:19 AM
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reply to post by Welfhard
 


Guess we have proved that truth is an evolving vehicle of vacillating ideas that are invalidated by the passage of time and different ways of looking at the same thing. its been fun......thanks



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 05:59 AM
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A true christian has nothing to do with dinos or when the earth was created. That is not a teaching or concern of jesus.



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by debris765nju
 


Guess we have proved that truth is an evolving vehicle of vacillating ideas that are invalidated by the passage of time and different ways of looking at the same thing. its been fun......thanks


Since it's an ever evolving "vehicle", we aught to recognise outdated and primative ideas. We aren't looking at the same thing in two different ways. You're looking at a creation fable wherein the earth was created an undetermined amount or time (although estimated 6500ys ago) before the sun and other heavenly bodies. Even if it were an allegory of the real events, it's still incredibly wrong.

[edit on 9-3-2009 by Welfhard]



posted on Mar, 9 2009 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by vehemes terra eternus
Those are some peculiar twists, the good samaritan part sounds too good to be true but I believe you. Did you notice anything strange about him? Did he look like a local?

Frankly, when the guy first approached me and proposed to lend me a hand, I was very suspicious — you know, that he might be a serial killer or a pervert or something. Starving as I was, I was still a pretty large and lean person, and I figured if he tried anything funny I could snap him in-two in a heartbeat. He seemed to be aware of that, and he maintained his distance — perhaps more for my peace of mind than his.

He appeared entirely like a local, or as much of a local as he could be, given that most island dwellers are transplants from up north. He was about 5'5", lean, tanned, short-cropped curly black hair, graying mustache and temples, and very dark brown eyes. He was wearing the typical island apparel: oversized white cotton short-sleeved sport shirt, kind of tan or beige ho-daddy (surfer) shorts, and Tiva sandals. No jewelry at all, which is normal (nobody wants to ruin the tan, right). I made mental notes of all this, in case I had to tell the police later.

His dialect was straight out of the Bronx. As I mentioned, most islanders that I ever met were from up north — many from Canada, in fact, but most from New Jersey or Pennsylvania or New York.

And his name was Nick. Which didn't strike me as unusual at the time, but years later it dawned on me that I may have had an encounter with Saint Nicholas — not Santa Claus the jolly old elf, but the Saint Nicholas, Nicholas of Myra, a miracle-working and time-traveling Catholic Bishop from the 4th Century, I think, who still makes such life-saving appearances from time to time. If you take such legends seriously, that is.

It also occurred to me that he might be Old Nick... another handle for the Devil himself. Except that Old Nick doesn't have a reputation for performing favors without some sort of binding contract — again, if you take such legends seriously.

After pondering the incident for many years, I'm inclined to think it was either Saint Nicholas or an angel of some sort, but not of the demonic variety.


Originally posted by vehemes terra eternus
"Come on, I really need help right now," and then something surprising would happen, usually just exactly what I needed. Any more examples??????? Also do you have any examples of the "miraculous interventions" your fellow church goers have experienced???

Well, I could write a book with all of the peculiar twists of the island odyssey — come to think of it, I've probably already written the book over the years, just need to compile the notes and find a publisher. Among many other weird things that transpired during those two years, my eyesight inexplicably improved to the extent that I was able to trash the prescription glasses that I'd worn all my life — my vision became so acute, in fact, that I could spot and identify any coinage, any jewelry, or virtually any tiny thing of value, half-buried in the sand 50 feet away. This was an extraordinary gift for beachcombing, which was one of my only steady sources of income. More than that, my night vision became cat-like — with no exaggeration, I could discern individuals or groups of people strolling along the beach at midnight a mile away, identify their gender based on their gate, and tell you whether they were advancing on or retreating from me.

My wife, who is a nutritionist among other things, tells me that starvation can have that effect on people, enhancing their senses, making them sharper and more animal-like. Maybe. In any event, my transition from extremely near-sighted to eagle-eyed occurred in one week. It was like Spider-Man, right, going to sleep wearing thick prescription glasses, then waking up the next morning with super-vision. Totally inexplicable, in my opinion, but the transition definitely enhanced my ability to survive, just when I needed it.

As for some of the folks presently at my church, there's a 60-year-old woman who was suffering kidney failure, doctors had her on the bucket list, and we were all anticipating a funeral at any moment. Then she suddenly shows up back at church, perfectly healthy — and I mean doctors-scratching-their-heads what-the-hell-happened cured. On Friday she's on her deathbed, on Sunday she walks into church, sings with the choir, and acts like nothing untoward has happened. We were just flabbergasted. My wife asked her, you know, why aren't you dead? And this quiet little lady says, very simply, "I prayed about it." That was her explanation.

We also have a fairly young Marine who was in Iraq five years ago, where he caught a nice big chunk of shrapnel in the back of his head, pulverizing a section of skull the size of a baseball. He, too, was on the bucket list, was brought back stateside in a coma. Doctors at the veterans hospital were agreed that he would be blind and vegetative, if by some miracle he lived. Well, against all odds, he survived — came out of the ordeal within months with only a steel plate in his head, but that's it. He wasn't blind, he wasn't vegetative, he wasn't even slightly disabled. Today this guy is married, has three kids, works at a construction job, is on the church council, and is strong as an ox. He doesn't often talk about his war wounds; but, one evening as we were having a cig on the corner, I rather bluntly asked him about his coma — did he have any dreams, or was it just a sustained blackout with no memories?

He told me that he knew he had died, that he left his body and did the whole near-death experience routine — flying, light at the end of a tunnel, people (or personalities) waiting for him on the other side, etc. He said he was perfectly okay with dying, he wasn't fearful in the least, he was ready to go; however, he was told it wasn't his time to die, that he had to go back, because he was expected to marry and have a family. So he did.

Anyway, those are a couple of the really wild cases of miraculous intervention in our church. There are others, but those are the real eye-poppers. I will mention one more: Several years ago, a local boy here in my town was a bad seed, if you know what I mean. He was a one-man crime wave, a major drug-head, a drunk, and a regular guest of the county jail. He hated his family, he hated authority, he hated humanity. There are no existing photos of this kid smiling. None. People around here had resigned themselves to the sad likelihood that this kid was either going to prison or was going to be murdered. Or both.

Today this kid is 26 years old. He's happily married and has a baby girl. I haven't had a chance yet, but I intend to corner him soon and ask about his transformation. See, he was just ordained as a pastor in the Lutheran Church last week. Gotta be a major intervention story in there somewhere.


Originally posted by vehemes terra eternus
Conscious Universe, I like that. Have you heard of the Global Consciousness Project?

No, I haven't heard of the Global Consciousness Project, but I'll look into it.

Based on my mid-life experiences, I've come to think of God as an effect, more than as an entity — an effect that permeates everything, like another, as-yet-undiscovered physical law of our Universe. Maybe it's the physical law underlying all others, the effects of which have been observed by humankind for thousands of generations in a thousand different cultures...and maybe gods and religions were our best primitive explanation for this effect.

— Doc Velocity



posted on Mar, 10 2009 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by RuneSpider
I know several atheists who believe in a afterlife, but not a God. Some are open to the idea of a god figure, in the sense that they feel that after death we join part of a consciousness, others believe in reincarnation without any overseeing karma.

Well, even Science is coming to realize that there's something mighty peculiar about our Universe — that it seems to react to our observation and testing of it, providing researchers with expected results rather than consistent results.

I find that very interesting, along with the fringe theory that particles on one side of the universe can resonate with or even anticipate the activity of particles on the other side of the universe in a kind of non-localized simultaneity.

Aside from blowing the Cosmic Speed Limit (186,000 miles per second) completely out of the water, this whole notion of a reactive and anticipatory Universe sounds to me like a massive Consciousness, one that extends, perhaps, across our four dimensions of existence as well as many others.

I mean, even by Scientific and atheistic standards, there's nothing to prohibit a Conscious Universe. I think most scientists and atheists would accept the contention that Humans are conscious to some little degree. They would probably also agree that Humans are products of this Universe, that we evolved by some fiendish method from elemental stellar material (Sagan's "star stuff"). We are the Universe pondering itself, right?

Following the same logic, I would suggest that, because we are the Universe, and because we are conscious (in our own estimation), then the Universe is at least as conscious as we are.

At least. But I think probably much more so.

If we're living in the midst of a vast Conscious Continuum, then perhaps there is some sort of dynamic relationship between what's out there and what's in here. I have no problem with the notion of a Universe that reacts when we observe it, test it, or pray to it. Perhaps the Universe also observes and tests us; perhaps this feedback has been observed for hundreds of thousands of years by our evolving species, and we've formulated a variety of explanations for it.


Originally posted by RuneSpider
Science isn't trying to prove anything exists, Science is trying to understand what already exists, with the possibly of understanding how it came to be, maybe even why.

Oh, please, Science is very insistent when it comes to proving what does and does not exist. That which we can capture and dissect most certainly exists, according to Science. If we cannot bring it into the lab and chop it up and label the pieces, then it does not exist. That's the scientific community's position on UFOs, cryptozoology, and paranormal phenomena in general. And God help the scientist who dares offer the fringe theory. The old hounds at the heart of the pack will rush out and eat the poor bastard alive in defense of Scientific dogma, and pick their teeth with his bones.

On the other hand, the scientific community has no problem declaring that manmade global warming is a hard fact although the research on this subject is incomplete and contradictory at best and in some instances outright falsified.

I know there are good people involved in the various sciences; but, taken on the whole, the scientific community is still just another members-only club of dogmatism and office politics.


Originally posted by RuneSpider
These studies, which you seem to almost gleefully trivialize, are often the work of, sometimes even the lifelong work of men and women. Maybe the computer you are using right now seems pretty ridiculous, same for the internet you use to access this site. But your computer includes several different fields of science: metallurgy, physics, mathematics, polymerization, ect.

I'm not trivializing anything. I think Science is an important tool, but it has provided us more grief than any other creation in Human history: Overpopulation, manmade climate change, mad cow disease, nuclear holocaust, super-resistant plague, monster ozone hole, you name it. All products of half-baked and poorly-thought-out Science.

As for computer technology, I don't think there's a single user out there who is satisfied with the damned thing.


— Doc Velocity







[edit on 3/10/2009 by Doc Velocity]



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 04:53 AM
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reply to post by Skinon
 


hello matey

yes i do believe they exsisted and i do believe in a young earth.
it works if you do not subscribe to the current dateing methods and theory.

sorry its as plain as that for me.

cheers

David



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 05:40 AM
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Originally posted by Skinon

.......................

Did god create them first and played with them for a few hundred million years then get sick of them and reset the slate to start with humans? Ok this is a question directed to devout christians, Do you believe dinosaurs existed? If not then what is your reason? Im sorry i really just dont buy into any of this religion bollocks, i mean if god existed then science wouldn't. Of course the funniest thing about this is that people can argue till there blue in the face and it wont change a thing.

......................



I believe dinosaurs existed. I mean.... we have the bones, fossils etc. dont we? So obviously something lived on this earth that those bones once belonged to.
People forget that Genesis 1:1-2 doesnt give us a timeframe between when the earth was made and when God created everything. So the earth could very well be billions of years old.
Also, God doesnt just make things appear. As in... he didnt make Adam and Eve magicaly appear out of the ground, he didnt make the animals magicaly appear out of the ground either. We dont see this happening in today's world so we shouldnt expect it to have happened 10 000 years ago either.
Just because the bible doesnt explain how it happened doesnt mean that it didnt.



posted on Mar, 21 2009 @ 05:58 AM
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reply to post by Razimus
 


People seriously need to think outside the box and stop being so closed minded. The fact is no one knows what this reality is or where it came from. Those who do are simply deluding themselves. All we have is conjecture & speculation until proven otherwise.

Has anyone stopped and thought for a moment and considered the fact that we might possibly be living in a simulation which in itself is a plausible theory. If we are, then when was the simulation turned on? The bible might be right, the simulation might of started 6000 years ago in the garden of Eden with Adam & Eve. The dinosaurs never walked the Earth, their fossils are simply a creation of the simulation.



posted on Mar, 25 2009 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by kindred
reply to post by Razimus
 

Has anyone stopped and thought for a moment and considered the fact that we might possibly be living in a simulation which in itself is a plausible theory. If we are, then when was the simulation turned on? The bible might be right, the simulation might of started 6000 years ago in the garden of Eden with Adam & Eve. The dinosaurs never walked the Earth, their fossils are simply a creation of the simulation.


What annoys me is these crazy hypothetical situations people come up with when they are entirely pointless. One might suggest that sparrows speculate about the social dynamics of Angler Fish.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 09:24 AM
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Sorry but what I said is completely valid and as far as theories go, it's plausible. Just like the theory of evolution & creationism.



posted on Mar, 26 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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The fossil evidence that exists, in its entierty, is produced when some sort of geological event occurs like an eruption from the Yellowstone Volcano, this ash falls and kills most creatures in their tracks. This ash is radioactive and has a lot of free radioactive material in it. This ash falls on the carcases and the radioactive particles are absorbed into their dead bodies then it rains, acid rain. This acid rain dissolves the elements in the ash and carries them into the carcases, this in turn leaves the carcases to petrify, buried under the ash. Notice that the radioactive material from the eruption ash migrated into the carcases, this is where your radiometric signature is derived from. Those events didn't occur billions of years ago. The Earth is a giant nuclear reactor and hot spot volcanism, like Yellowstone, will prove to be the proof of this, as it is very testable. I am a geology student and believe that large volcanic events emit radioactive particles in their ashs; the ammount of radioactive material depends on how close the source is in relation to the surface of the earth. As a volcano propigates new eruptions the heavy source below, falls deeper and deeper, and the signature dating gets younger and younger. I can go on with this theory of mine for a whole book, but this is it in a nutshell.



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