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Unidentified object in the night sky. (NOT Venus)

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posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 05:54 AM
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reply to post by interestedalways
 


The chicken wire, or honey comb effect is part of the internal optical NV system.




posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 05:59 AM
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There is a conversation going on about this very thing right now... i shall go and post the link to this thread here, great footage.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 06:01 AM
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Originally posted by interestedalways
what is the explanation of all the honeycomb shapes in the background?

Is this just a part of the camera or filming experience?


my guess would be its shot through a window screen...could be wrong, but i get the same effect when trying to capture stuff outsside.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 06:01 AM
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Could be Rigel:




Appears to be in the position your video indicates.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by zorgon
 


Thanks this is sofar the best explanation although I wonder I still if it's indeed the same location as what I filmed.
Here's according to Stelarium the position of NGC 2068 (M78) where roughly 12 south the outburst was observed.
I would think the object is a lot closer to Betelgeuse.



The object reminds me a lot of the so called cylinders around Saturn or the Mars Phobos picture.



Not to say they are in any way related but it just reminds me of these



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


The observation position was in Europe (Luxembourg) so your position, Australia shows it upside down. Rigel was at the time of the observation slightly above horizon line and Rigel never showed like a tube, always a round star.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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Assuming the object is real, it must be relatively close, in Earth orbit. There is no celestial object of any size in that location. You were simply lucky to observe it in visual proximity to Betelgeuse. It appears to be illuminated by sunlight, which places it outside the Earth's shadow cone. I don't think any low orbit satellites are illuminated at that hour no matter where they are placed. But it wasn't moving like a low satellite, so the distance must be quite large, essentially geostationary. If it's geostationary, it has to be at least 20,000 miles out. If it's located at such a distance it has to be exceedingly large for your tiny optics to 'see' it. I'd say it must be several hundred miles long to appear as it does. Orion is located visually in the narrow band that's used by geostationary satellites. The three stars in the belt are sometimes reported to show moving lights. These are believed to be geostationary satellites observed under favourable circumstances through large telescopes (very rare events).

If any of the above is relevant, it's unlikely if not impossible to repeat the observation. Where would you look? That's why I think it's important to actually point your rig at and around a very bright source such as Sirius and the Moon to see if any similar anomoly can be created and captured on video.

WG3



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:04 AM
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It is kind of odd that your sighting occured in the Orion constellation.

The other night I was gazing up at Orion and I SWEAR I saw the center star of the "belt" move. It made a circle.
So then I looked at it again and it was back to normal. I rationalized it off as just a trick my eyes were playing on me and went about my business. I had even forgotten all about it until you jogged my memory...

Good post.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 01:29 PM
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I have just taken this picture of the objekt. I am living in Denmark
and it really sticks out on the night sky and its even slightly cloudy.
I apologize for my bad English



[edit on 14-2-2009 by peterfromdk]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 01:39 PM
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Very interesting, S&F.
In the last 30 seconds, the object moves and changes its shape, it suddenly become smaller and rounder, was this part shot later? How long after the first part?
I hope someone can point a telescope and take a look.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by waveguide3
 


It looks as though it's going to be a clear starry night today. I'll set up my rig again and will try to shoot Betelgeuse at about the same time to see if anything still shows up.

I already went to see at 20:00 local time and didn't see anything near Betelgeuse. I'll shoot Procyon aswell since it's a 0.40 mag compared to Betelgeuse 0.45 mag to show it's not created by bright objects.
Not sure if I'll catch Sirius then aswell it might be just under a tree line, but I'll try.

I'll post the results ASAP to the media section!



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by peterfromdk
 


Good picture. Which location was it when you took it?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by Nightchild
 


The window I took the picture out of, is facing west.
so I would say west southwest



[edit on 14-2-2009 by peterfromdk]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by peterfromdk
 

Wow nice pic. Now if that isn't Venus............ then what on Earth is it?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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reply to post by icblue
 


Where would this comet be in relation to where you were looking?

www.universetoday.com...

A new comet is swinging around the sun, and soon it will be more visible to stargazers, perhaps even with the naked eye. Both professional and amateur astronomers have been tracking this unusual comet, named Comet Lulin. Thanks to amateur astronomer Gregg Ruppel, who lives in the St. Louis, Missouri area for sharing images he has acquired of Comet Lulin. Gregg took the image above on January 11, 2009. The most interesting characteristic of this comet is its orbit. Lulin is actually moving in the opposite direction as the planets, so its apparent velocity will be quite fast. Estimates are it will be moving about 5 degrees a day across the sky, so when viewed with a telescope or binoculars, you may be able to see the comet's apparent motion against the background stars. This is quite unusual!



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 03:27 PM
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I agree that you don't have venus...

I've posted some info in here that might give an idea of what it is...

then again with my ATS experience, the above statement is probably wrong...

rgds



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by PauligirlWhere would this comet be in relation to where you were looking?


In the Northern hemisphere, Comet Lulin is still a morning object in Libra with just about naked eye visibility. There's no possibility on Earth that the object seen near Betelgeuse is that comet or any other currently doing the rounds.

WG3.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 

www.skyandtelescope.com...
In Virgo. That's not it.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:47 PM
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Originally posted by icblue
reply to post by interestedalways
 


The chicken wire, or honey comb effect is part of the internal optical NV system.


Could you break that down for me?

What is the NV system?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:53 PM
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To the OP --

Just so we're clear here, you are NOT talking about the bright star (which I suppose is Betelgeuse), but the object in question is rather the "shadowy" long thin horizontal object beneath it (and later beneath and to the left)

Am I correct? It seems many of the replies here are describing Betelgeuse and NOT the object directly below it.

Could it have been a some sort of high-altitude cloud?

[edit on 2/14/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



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