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The "up-to-the-minute Market Data" thread

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posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 
Seoul Composite 1,015.38 11:02PM ET 47.65 (4.48%)
HSBC is reeking havoc on those poor souls...they're runnin'...
surprised Gold isn't moving higher yet...



[edit on 3/1/2009 by Hx3_1963]




posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:27 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


EU has declined to bailout Eastern Europe and the US is giving AIG ANOTHER $30 Billion, plus the HSBC stuff I posted earlier are the market movers tonight.

What will be the movers tomorrow? only time will tell



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:41 PM
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OOoopps , I may have spoken too soon

AIG failure would still be disastrous for global markets


AIG's board on Sunday approved a broad revision of the U.S. government's $150 billion rescue. It was the third time the government has reached out to the struggling insurer and the latest rescue is expected to put greater funds at AIG's disposal to keep it afloat as it readies to report a roughly $60 billion loss early on Monday.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 
How long can the fed continue this madness...

Fannie Mae needs $15.2B
AIG needs $???B more
Citi needs $???B more
GM needs $30B-$45B + Chy & Ford ect
BofA will probley be next...then Freddie & Salli...ect...rinse...repeat...


Look like Eastern Markets are set to open 2%-3% lower...

[edit on 3/1/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 



Dow will hit 6,999 and lower this week?

agree?



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by Hx3_1963
 


Well when you add to all you listed the FACT that so far we can only fund 40% of what we have planned to fund - I guess the bond market will be the deciding force on when we truly crash.



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by Doomsday 2029
 
At this rate it will open lower than 7000...but as red stated, asia is following our friday & their news...have to see about eastern markets...usually western markets set the current days trend, but...
+/- 100 not out of the question...



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 
True enough...if they get to itchy, spreads widen...it'll get tougher...I see 10 Yr Yields above 3% again... and heard CDS were widening friday also...


[edit on 3/1/2009 by Hx3_1963]



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 


I'm not sure if this is entirely relevant, but isn't the bailout essentially funded by China's purchasing of our bonds?

If Zeitgeist II: Addendum is correct in their explanation on how bonds and debt work... does this not mean that China is playing the game we've been playing with ourselves and other, less developed, nations for years? Please correct me if I'm wrong, because I'm very new to this whole process...
Hypothetically: If China buys 1 trillion in bonds. Then China turns around and gives that one trillion to the US, like a loan. So then we will eventually owe back that+interest (that doesn't really exist). Is that how it works?


So we have a 1.1 trillion debt to china, and china is in debt to us for 1 trillion...

PS: A big thank you goes out to the regular posters on this thread.. you're doing an incredible job of informing people like me to how stocks function, futures work, how the other markets are effected by what, etc.. it's great! Thanks so much!



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by Avarus
 


U.S. Treasury bills are short-term debt obligations (securities) of the U.S. government. A Treasury bill matures within one year. Treasury notes have maturities up to 10 years, while Treasury bonds have a final maturity of more than 10, but less than 30, years.

T-bills are discount securities. That means that a bill is bought at a discount to its stated or face value. The government pays the face value at maturity. The interest earned is the difference between the price paid and the price received on the T-bill when it is sold or matures.

When China buys our Treasuries, we may be selling $12 billion, but if they bought ALL of them - they may pay only $10 Billion. The interest earned over the life of the bill/bond brings the pay out up to the "face value."

Strangely enough, no actual currencies are exchanged in the sale of T-bonds. Only 1's and 0's in a computer system. As it is with most credit transactions.

All our TBills/bonds are backed "by the full faith and credit of the US Government" - e.g. the US Taxpayers.

I am not completely familiar with how Zeitgeist explains it, so I cannot comment directly on that aspect of it & I am not going to go watch that LONG video right now to find out
If you can summarize it for me I can then see if it is correct or not



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by redhatty
 


That makes sense. Here is an excerpt from the part of zeitgeist that I'm talking about. They later go into detail on how we use this system to corrupt other governments into privatizing their country's resources.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:31 PM
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DJIA INDEX 6,948.00 -104.00 7,040.00 7,041.00 6,948.00 00:17

Major asian markets still down 3.5%-4%

Gold steady $952.75



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:35 PM
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Don't Count out consumer stocks




posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by Avarus
 


Okay, about the only thing that I could see (in the few minutes I saw it) that is factually incorrect is this. The US TREASURY sells the bonds at auction. The Federal Reserve can be a buyer, but for the most part, the Fed becomes the buyer of last resort. Since the US Central bank buying the US debt is like a snake eating it's own tail - ask the snake how that turns out


Banks and foreign central banks are usually the buyers of the bonds. By selling the bond, we finance the debt we create. On a 30 yr bond, we give the country 30 years to make good on the debt, while still paying interest on it on a regular basis.

Sometimes, there comes a situation where the entire bond cannot be paid out. When this happens you hear of a country "rolling the bond." This means that they came to an agreement with the holder of the actual bond to continue to pay interest on it but not pay it out, for whatever specified time is agreed upon.

When a country defaults on a bond, it means that they either could not pay the regular interest payment on it or could not roll it over. It is a VERY bad thing when this happens.

Now when we talk about a bond market dislocation, there is a "usual and normal" spread on a bond. Say face value is 1 billion, and the "normal spread is 2.75. That means that the person who buys the bond pays $725 Million for an eventual payback of $1 Billion.

Remember these sales are always at auction, so potential buyers BID on the bonds & we, of course, sell to the buyer who gives us the best spread - the lower the spread the better.

Should an auction occur where we end up with a spread over 5, then we are seriously facing a bond market dislocation. Anything higher than 5 and we are toast.

Does that help you understand it a little better?



posted on Mar, 1 2009 @ 11:43 PM
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Originally posted by Hx3_1963
DJIA INDEX 6,948.00 -104.00 7,040.00 7,041.00 6,948.00 00:17

Major asian markets still down 3.5%-4%

Gold steady $952.75


S&P futures -12.25 to 722

Yuck



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:01 AM
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reply to post by redhatty
 
What's the next S&P support level under 720?
We going back to '94 on this also?



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:10 AM
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Here we go again Hx3. I better either start the coffee or hit some nyquil.

Lot's of headlines being dropped tonight. Given the fact that the Brit PM is going to be discussing Global New Deal on Tuesday, I can almost definatly predict today is going to have huge loss. I've always said once we drop below that 7k mark, there'd be a massive sell off. It all goes hand in hand eh?

-106.00 @ 1:10 am



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:12 AM
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Originally posted by Hx3_1963
reply to post by redhatty
 
What's the next S&P support level under 720?
We going back to '94 on this also?


Oh we are looking at a nice slope down to 415 IF we go below 700

Wonderful thought huh?.... NOT

Edit to add: Just for some HOPE


Tony Caldaro's weekend update states...

SHORT TERM
Support for the SPX remains at 734 and then 717, with resistance at 768 and then 789. Short term momentum is displaying a positive divergence at friday's close. At the current lows this downtrend is exactly 209 SPX points, (944-735). This falls a bit short of equalling the first downtrend of Major wave c, Int. 1 and 240 points. Yet, it exceeds both Int. 1 and Int. 5 of Major wave A, which were 170 and 139 points respectively. When Major wave A bottomed in Mar 2008, Int. wave 5 exceeded Int. wave 3 by only 13 points. Should this Int. wave 5 of Major wave C be similar, it should exceed Int. wave 3 by only a few points. Int. wave 3 ended in Nov 2008 at 741, and Int. wave 5 is currently 6 points lower at 735. Again this market looks like it's getting close to a bottom.

Of course, He thinks we are getting close to a bottom when there hasn't been any real capitulation yet - so take it for what it's worth


[edit on 3/2/09 by redhatty]



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by Whisper67
 

The Dow has already penetrated both the intraday Oct. 10, 2002, low and the closing low of 7,178. And the S&P 500, too, has penetrated the October closing and intraday lows.

This means that there are few identifiable chart support areas that we can refer to until July 1996, where some support is shown for the Dow at 5,300 to 5,700 and the S&P 500 at around 650. But that is so far back in time that the probability of using the figures as real targets is impractical.
www.bloggingstocks.com...

This is not looking very promising...down right discouraging is more like it...capitulation here we come?



posted on Mar, 2 2009 @ 12:21 AM
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Originally posted by Hx3_1963
This is not looking very promising...down right discouraging is more like it...capitulation here we come?


NEVER underestimate the power of the US Government stick saves!

Of course, I have noticed that Bush's sticksaves were much more effective than Obama's have been. Maybe bumbling Bush wasn't so bumbling after all???




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