It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

H.I.M Haile Selassie - Rastafarian Christ

page: 1
5
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 10:04 AM
link   
I did a search and didn't find anything on this topic.. and before anyone questions why this is in Conspiracies in Religion. Let me say that Rastafarians believe that the death of Haile Selassie was a conspiracy and that he did not truly die. They also believe that Jesus was Black, and not the only "messiah". Haile Selassie was the living God on earth and another version of Jesus Christ. I bring this topic here, because I feel many do not truly understand Rastafarianism and only think of it as weed smoking dreadlocks, plus I wanted to discuss why Rastas hold on to this belief, even though Haile Selassie never accepted the idea of him being a messiah and encouraged the Rastas to read and study the scriptures (He was a member of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church). However, the faith and beliefs of the Rastafarians persisted and he remains a revered figure.
A Rasta to this day will greet you with "Greeting in the name of the most high, H.I.M Haile Selassie". They had also claimed that Selassie had nail marks in the palm of his hand proving his divinity. I have no intentions of this becoming a religion bashing thread, I have respect for the Rastafarian religion and their culture and would like this to be an intelligent discussion to try to understand why they cling to these beliefs. If there are any Rastas out there, I would especially love to hear from you.

Rastafarian Religion has in roots in Garvinism. Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican, who promoted the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) in the 1920s. The organization's main goal was to unite black people with their rightful homeland, Africa. Garvey believed that all black people in the western world should return to Africa since they were all descended from Africans. He preached that the European colonizers, having fragmented the African continent, unfairly spread the African population throughout the world.

Garvey was considered a prophet by many and he even spoke in a very prophetical way. He assured his followers, "No one knows when the hour of Africa's redemption cometh. It is in the wind. It is coming. One day, like a storm, it will be here." He told blacks to "look to Africa for the crowning of a king to know that your redemption is near."

In 1930, Prince Ras Tafari Makonnen was crowned the new Emperor of Ethiopia. Upon his coronation, he claimed for himself the title of Emperor Haile Selassie (Power of the Trinity). This announcement was a monumental event that many blacks in Africa and the Americas saw as the fulfillment of Garvey's prophecy years before. After the crowning of Selassie, the Rastafarian movement gained a following and officially began. Ironically, Selassie was never a Rastafarian himself, and no one is really sure what he ever thought of his following. Also noteworthy is the fact that Garvey himself was admittedly not an admirer of Haile Selassie, and he went as far as to attack the Ethiopians as "crazy fanatics.

Haile Selassie visited Jamaica on April 21, 1966, while the country was amid an ongoing national social crisis in which Rastas were perceived by the majority as a revolutionary threat that had to be defused. During this first and final trip to Jamaica, Selassie met with several Rastafarian leaders. The visit resulted in two profound developments within the Rastafarian movement. First, Selassie convinced the Rastafarian brothers that they "should not seek to immigrate to Ethiopia until they had liberated the people of Jamaica." Second, from that day forth, April 21st has been celebrated as a special holy day among Rastafarians, "Grounation Day."

In Jamaica, the reverence of Emperor Haile Selassie continued to create distinguishable movements, such as Nyabinghi, the Ethiopian National Congress or Bobo dreads, the Twelve Tribes of Israel.

The Twelve Tribes of Israel, founded by the Prophet Gad, has added another dimension in the liberation movement, to include liberation for all races through the teaching of the bible, and the acceptance of Jesus Christ. Membership is not limited, but inclusive. By identifying the spiritual sons of Jacob and finding truth for oneself through reading the bible "a chapter a day", man can find salvation. The divine lineage continues through the Ethiopian Monarchy, the seed of David, of which it is said, "The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from beneath his feet, until Shiloh comes and unto Him will be the gathering of the people."

To Rastafarians, Selassie was much more than just a political leader; Rasta theology centered on the divinity of Selassie as a living manifestation of Jah, the all-knowing and all-loving God. To Rastafarians, the story told by the Old Testament pertains to black Africans who descend from Abraham and Jacob. But white Christians altered this fact to keep Africans in a substandard position. Rastafarians refer to this oppression as "Babylon", with obvious references to a state of slavery and cultural tyranny that all blacks must overcome. To greater represent the truth, Rasta rejects the Bible used by most Christians, opting instead for a "black man's Bible" known as the The Holy Piby

In his life, Selassie claimed to be a direct descendant of King Solomon and Queen Sheba, however he did not claim any divine powers or that he was Jesus Christ.

In 1974, Emperor Haile Selassie was detained and overthrown by the Marxist dictator Mengistu Haile Mariam in a 1974 coup (In 1960 Selassie's son, Asfa Wossan lead an unsuccessful coup against his father. His dad forgave him but all the other leaders of the coup are executed.)

He was detained by soldiers loyal to the new government in his palace until his death. On August 27, 1975, Haile Selassie died, and a tremendous crisis of faith ensued. With his death came various forms of rationalization from many Rastafarians. The responses concerning Selassie's death ranged from "his death was a fabrication" to "his death was inconsequential because Haile Selassie was merely a personification of God".
The circumstances of his death were mysterious but many believe he was murdered by his captors. In 1992 after the Marxist government was overthrown, the remains of Emperor Haile Selassie were found buried under a toilet in the Imperial Palace. The body was exhumed and moved to a mausoleum in Addis Ababa.

Many Rastafarians believed that his death was staged by the media in an attempt to bring their faith down, while others claimed that Haile Selassie I had trodded on to the perfect flesh, and sits on the highest point of Mount Zion where He and Empress Menen await the Time of Judgement. There are others, however, who were quite logical in their approach to the theological problem surrounding the Emperor's death. They saw the death of Selassie as changing nothing, except that their God was no longer physically present. Such Rastafarians claimed that He is omnipresent in spirit and visited the clouds with the hosts of heaven.

Leonard Howell (Rasta Leader) gave the Rastafarians six fundamental principles:

Hatred for the white race.

The complete superiority of the black race.

Revenge on whites for their wickedness.

The negation, persecution, and humiliation of the government and legal bodies of Jamaica.

Preparation to go back to Africa, and

Acknowledging Emperor Haile Selassie as the Supreme Being and only ruler of black people.

Concepts that are key to Rastafarian beliefs:

Babylon: "Babylon" is the Rastafarian term for the white political power structure that has been holding the black race down for centuries. In the past, Rastas claim that blacks were held down physically by the shackles of slavery. In the present, Rastas feel that blacks are still held down through poverty, illiteracy, inequality, and trickery by the white man. The efforts of Rastafarianism is to attempt to remind blacks of their heritage and have them stand up against this Babylon.

I and I: This concept has become "the most important theoretical tool apart from the Babylonian conspiracy in the Rastafarian repertoire." Cashmore explains, "I and I is an expression to totalize the concept of oneness, the oneness of two persons. So God is within all of us and we're one people in fact. I and I means that God is in all men. The bond of Ras Tafari is the bond of God, of man. But man itself needs a head and the head of man is His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia."

Jah: The Rastafarian name for God is Jah. The presence of Jah in His children and in the world is the triumph over the tribulations of everyday life. Ethiopia specifically, and Africa in general, is considered the Rastas heaven on Earth. However, there is no afterlife or hell as Christianity believes.

These above 6 rules given by Howell might have been the original intentions, however Rastafarianism is more about promoting unity, peace, love, comtemplation, respect for nature, respect for cultural heritage. BTW, if I missed any points or misrepresented the religious movement...let me know

Who is Haile Selassie
About H.I.M Haile Selassie
The Holy Piby: Black Man's Bible
www.swagga.com...
www.nomadfx.com...
religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edu...
reachouttrust.org...
www.bobmarley.com...




posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 10:17 AM
link   
I was going to link to something on Haile Salassie in a post I'll be making soon.Now I can just link to this one.


I think there is a big danger that if bin Laden isn't captured then a similar but more evil personality cult could arise.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 10:22 AM
link   
Rastafari is a religion. What annoys me is that rastafarians are still portrayed as drug abusing criminals in the media and in popular opinion.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 10:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by TheBandit795
Rastafari is a religion. What annoys me is that rastafarians are still portrayed as drug abusing criminals in the media and in popular opinion.




I agree bandit with the negative drug abusing portrayal.

weed smoking is just a minor ritual in rastafari, but preconceived notions of foreignors makes it seems that every Rasta spends all day and night getting high, which is totally false.

but even though the religion has evolved quite a bit from when it was first conceived, there are many discrepancies just as there are discrepancies in Christianity and Islam and other religions. that's kinda why I wanted to discuss it...especially the Selassie being Christ connection.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 11:29 AM
link   
Doesn’t the ancient writings say that Jesus will come with the armies of the heavens and also, many will say here he is or there he is but not to chase after because that is not Jesus? H.I.M Haile Selassie may not have claimed to be Jesus or the messiah but isn’t this religion making him into a messiah? Aren’t the Rasta’s creating their own conspiracy of lies by continuing with ideas that are not from the original ancient writings? I am not bashing the Rasta’s just questioning the continuation of religious dogma.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 11:51 AM
link   
well that's the point fieryice...to me I see major discrepancies in their beliefs regarding Haile Selassie, however when questioned....I was told by Rasta, that the bible said that when Jesus returned his followers and man would not recognize him. I can't give you an exact location of where the bible says that, I am not a bible scholar. They also use the colonel favorite bible passage: Rastafarians say scriptures prophesised him as the one with "the hair of whose head was like wool (the matted hair of I black man), whose feet were like unto burning brass (I black skin)".



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:06 PM
link   
since we are talking about Rastafarianism here, could someone please explain to me just who is Jah and why such a deity is so important? is it really benevolent? I love rastafaris, as they have to be one of the most peace-loving religious sects around, so don't get me wrong here.

and forgive me for being so bold, but "Jah" reminds me of Jahbulon. hell, Jah is a part of that trinity, for crying out loud.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:09 PM
link   
Jah is another name for Jehovah. AS far as I understand.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:09 PM
link   
Jah: The Rastafarian name for God is Jah. The presence of Jah in His children and in the world is the triumph over the tribulations of everyday life. Ethiopia specifically, and Africa in general, is considered the Rastas heaven on Earth. However, there is no afterlife or hell as Christianity believes.

Jah is GOD, same God as in the Bible, however they believe that Satan and the white man corrupted the bible, that is why they only believe and follow certain verses of the King James Bible and created their own bible called the Holy Piby. I have a link above if you want to read it.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:19 PM
link   
Yes, I just finished reading that thread of yours, WW. Intersting stuff, I must say. As a white person, however, I have to disagree with that Garvinism stuff. To me, that sounds like a guy who was backed by the NWO to create racial strife. Sure, it's a good idea to return to the motherland in an attempt to ressurect its greatness in the opression of the world, but the idea that "all blacks should go back" strikes me as outright eugenics. Not to mention, offensive. I think we, as people, all have a right to be where we want to be, whether others like it or not

On the other hand, you make an excellent point with "babylon". That term, Babylon, in the manner you are speaking of is not limited to the black population. Though you are right in naming such a filthy conspiracy, it also affects all of us, too, my friend. That term probably goes back to the term "babylon mystery school" which was nothing but a devil-worsphipping, hate-instilling secret society whose primary aim is to keep the public in the dark. AND I HATE THIS!!!!!!!

I know Jah is also Jehova who was probably the great scientist Ea/Enki. So maybe Jah isn't such a bad deity after all, but the fact that freemasons worship jahbulon as the grand architect of the universe makes me a bit... well... curious. damn man, it's going to take me a life time to figure out an answer to this one.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:21 PM
link   
When I was a student back in the 80's a friend of mine was boarding in a house owned by Rastas. I would visit every now and then and had many discussions about theology and Rastafarianism. Yes, they smoked weed, but that didn't detract from the fact that they were also very literate and strong-willed people. I am white, but they accepted me into their house, gave me drink and treated me as a friend. So I couldn't understand this section of the original thread:

Leonard Howell (Rasta Leader) gave the Rastafarians six fundamental principles:

Hatred for the white race.

The complete superiority of the black race.

Revenge on whites for their wickedness.

The negation, persecution, and humiliation of the government and legal bodies of Jamaica.

Preparation to go back to Africa, and

Acknowledging Emperor Haile Selassie as the Supreme Being and only ruler of black people.


Yes, they disliked the Jamaican govt, and revered Haile Selassie, but they certainly didn't hate the white race. Maybe they hated parts of it, but they basically treated a person as a person based on how they acted.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 12:25 PM
link   
quick reply pisky:

when rastafarianism originated in the 30's the principles that Lowell gave were the basis of the religion.

Today the religion has evolved quite a bit to reflect unity, peace, love, comtemplation, respect for nature, and respect for cultural heritage, however many old Jamaican rastafarians living in Jamaica and here in the US still hold on to those principle beliefs and their distrust for Babylon and the white man.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 04:38 PM
link   
bloodclot mon, me cyant stand it when likkle pickney dem, think dem so cool & try fi copy me patois. nah mek me haff to warn you again.

if you don't know it, don't try to fake it...it makes you look silly.

i asked kindly not to post bullcrap in my thread, I want a serious discussion. if you don't have anything to add or ask, then move along and leave your 2 cents somewhere else.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 05:00 PM
link   
first of all, if you read the post, you would understand that this is not my religion and i am not pushing "my" rastafarian religion on anyone. I am questioning their beliefs.

edited because i don't want banshee to hit me with a chair shot

now this is funny...i truly look like a mad woman arguing with herself


[Edited on 3-24-2004 by worldwatcher]



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 07:23 PM
link   
I assume various replies have been removed


Its ok, Worldwatcher. I used to talk to myself too - it was the only chance I had to have an intelligent conversation until I discovered ATS.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 07:48 PM
link   

Originally posted by Pisky

Yes, they disliked the Jamaican govt, and revered Haile Selassie, but they certainly didn't hate the white race. Maybe they hated parts of it, but they basically treated a person as a person based on how they acted.



I've actually seen caucasian Rasta's. And lot's of others are mulatto. I like they're lifestyle and ways, although I can't do it, because I love meat. What also eats me that reggae songs are so mainstream and so popular (especially Bob Marley's songs) but the meaning gets lost, or they make the songs superficial by making it a "white touristy daaay-o, kokomo (and -gasp!- "caribbean song")", or they turn them into to trance music.

And the prejudice against Rasta's lives on. Even on my own island which is in the caribbean. But a part of the population thinks they're white (while they're not caucasion, but mixed and light skinned) and feels that they're better than the rest of the caribbean islands (and the part of the island were I live). We call them the high-so-# people. Those people try for years to push European and (white) American culture into the island. Looks like it's working too, because trance is played more in the night clubs than any other music. And that on a caribbean island.

And the prejudice against Rasta's lives on.

I like rasta's, like other's here have said. They're very peaceful people.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 07:53 PM
link   
I've never heard the Rasta spin that Salassie didn't really die before, though I've heard many laugh about Rasta as the only relgion ever proven wrong since their "Angel" died.

Not my spin, just what I've heard from History and Theology professors.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 07:54 PM
link   
I've met a white rasta too. Complete with dreadlocks. He was a very interesting person, although I'm not really into the theology thing. He was one of the eco-warriors against the Newbury bypass in the 90's.



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 08:08 PM
link   
In my quest to understand why Rastafarians believe that Selassie was the Living God, I realize I am missing an important source of information which is the Kebra Nagast.

The Kebra Nagast documents the Queen of Sheba, King Solomon and the Ethiopian legacy from ancient biblical times. I am only in the introduction stages, but I am finding many new things, such as Cain and Abel had twin sisters that they married. The book discusses Jesus, Israel, Ethiopia and much more.

really fascinating stuff...

The Kebra Nagast

Here's a much better written description of the Kebra Nagast
"Contemporary scholars date the Kebra Negast to the 14th century, but it retells the stories of much earlier Biblical times, one very important story in particular. According to the Kebra Negast, the Israelites' Ark of the Covenant was spirited away to the ancient kingdom of Ethiopia by wise King Solomon's own son, offspring of the union between Solomon and the exotic Queen Makeda of Ethiopia (a.k.a. the Queen of Sheba). Gerald Hausman, a consummate storyteller of native traditions, presents the core narrative of the Kebra Negast, from Adam to the rise of the Ethiopian Solomonid dynasty. On top of this, he injects his own encounters with Rastafarians during his travels in Jamaica--dreadlocked Rastas as modern-day Samsons, their unwavering faith in Jah, and a rare outsider's glimpse at the Nyabinghi ceremony. The combination of ancient tale and modern belief give Hausman's Kebra Negast the rich flavor of enduring truth. --Brian Bruya Synopsis Handed down orally from generation to generation in Rastafarian and West Indies culture, the Kebra Negast has not been available in English translation since 1922. Because the subject of the text presents an African view of the Old and New Testament, the Kebra Negast has long been prohibited in many Caribbean nations and this ban is enforced even today. However, it has survived through the spoken word, as the cornerstone of the Rastafarian religion and was a significant influence on the lyrics of the late Bob Marley, among others."
www.ancientmanuscripts.com...


[Edited on 3-24-2004 by worldwatcher]



posted on Mar, 24 2004 @ 09:19 PM
link   
Okay here is the conspiracy regarding Haile Selassie, I have still to research it on the web..but i doubt i'll find anything. Anyways this is what I have gathered so far from speaking to a Rasta

Rastas claim that the death of Haile Selassie was very suspicious, and the body was never shown (i still have to research that) giving credence to him being still alive or to have risen.

Now keep in mind around the same time Robert Nesta Marley was in the midst of his short career. His songs were that of the Rastaman and they inspired many and created a worldwide phenomenon crossing cultural boundaries. Bob Marley had been given Haile Selassie's ring which had the emblem "the Lion of Judah" After his death, the ring dissappeared.

Rastas blame Babylon for the murder of Selassie and Bob Marley. They are very distrusting of the system and feel that it is Babylon who is trying to hide the truth.

This is a quote from the Kebra Nagast:

The Father, the Son, and
the Holy Spirit together
fashioned Zion, which is the
Kingdom of Heaven. And they
said, "Let us make Man in our
likeness."
The son said, "I will wear
the body of Adam."
And the Holy Spirit said, "I
will dwell in the heart of the
righteous."
And the Father said, "I will
become Man and I will abide in
everything I create. I will dwell
in flesh as well as seed and
plant; and I will dwell
in earth." Now in the days thereafter,
through the pleasure of the Fa-
ther, there came the Second
Zion whose name was Jesus
Christ.

the third zion being Haile Selassie and Marley a prophet



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join