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The 65 MPG Ford Car that the U.S. Cannot Have

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posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 05:54 PM
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TextIf ever there was a car made for the times, this would seem to be it: a sporty subcompact that seats five, offers a navigation system, and gets a whopping 65 miles to the gallon. Oh yes, and the car is made by Ford Motor (F), known widely for lumbering gas hogs.





Ford's 2009 Fiesta ECOnetic goes on sale in November. But here's the catch: Despite the car's potential to transform Ford's image and help it compete with Toyota Motor (TM) and Honda Motor (HMC) in its home market, the company will sell the little fuel sipper only in Europe. "We know it's an awesome vehicle," says Ford America President Mark Fields. "But there are business reasons why we can't sell it in the U.S." The main one: The Fiesta ECOnetic runs on diesel





Yet while half of all cars sold in Europe last year ran on diesel, the U.S. market remains relatively unfriendly to the fuel. Taxes aimed at commercial trucks mean diesel costs anywhere from 40 cents to $1 more per gallon than gasoline. Add to this the success of the Toyota Prius, and you can see why only 3% of cars in the U.S. use diesel. "Americans see hybrids as the darling," says Global Insight auto analyst Philip Gott, "and diesel as old-tech."


So there you have it... The real reason we cant have the amazing technology

I dont understand how this is a problem. Do away with a large percentage of Gasoline needs, the price comes down and a fluxuation comes. Its not really feasible but something to think about.

www.businessweek.com...


Mod Note: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 15-9-2008 by Jbird]




posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 07:19 PM
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Americans historically aren't fond of light, underpowered high MPG vehicles. They haven't sold well. Hybrids are popular because they can get the same performance as the typical gas-guzzling vehicles we're used to, yet offer reduced fuel consumption. I drive a tiny 80s ford truck that gets 30mpg, and it gets absolutely smoked by the prius, in straight line acceleration and top speed.

EUROPE, on the other hand is quite fond of small, underpowered diesel cars with great fuel economy. 65 miles per gallon is fairly high even by their standards, but 50 isn't unusual. 65 wouldn't be unprecedented.

I don't know if I'd buy such a vehicle, though, since it's a ford. Mine's been around for as long as I have, without any problems, but generally ford vehicles are well below class in reliability. (Although I hear that they've actually improved their quality by leaps and bounds over the past 4 years or so.) Fords have almost no resale value. In just two years, they often lose 1/2 to 3/4ths of their value (for certified pre-owned, not just typical used, no less.).

Really, 65 miles per gallon isn't that much of an engineering challenge. It's just a matter of putting a small, efficient diesel in a small light car, and not making it unnecessarily heavy. Back in the 80s, some models of CRX could get 40-41 miles per gallon, and those were gasoline-fueled and actually pretty sprightly. The mechanical engineering team at my university has made a vehicle that gets 1900 miles per gallon, but honestly, very few people would want to drive it. Tops out at maybe 15-20 miles per hour, and is unable to navigate steep hills.

When people feel it's a financially sound idea, you'll be able to buy a non-hybrid car that can get 50+ miles per gallon in America. Until then, if you're that desperate, buy a freaking mid-range sport motorcycle. They've always been cheap, higher performance than all but the best cars, and get at least 50 miles per gallon.



posted on Sep, 14 2008 @ 07:26 PM
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reply to post by mdiinican
 


Well In terms of Engineering something, the school you go to or went to could turn that motor into the core of powering a motor that creates electricity for backup in your home. If a motor like that were used it might be even more affordable to rely on that for powereing a home designed more economically feasable.

I would have never wanted a ford either but the focus wasnt bad and the new trucks they have are nice looking but thats about it. The new car however would be recommended. If Fords haven't been reliable in the past I am sure you could link ot to job growth for Vehicle repair stores and the rising market of auto sales. The U.S. has to work together in keeping a stable job market for all peoples. It is why they are training people currently in all the new technology as we slowly merge away from Current vehicles standards. Unfortunately they need to make a great shift and quit playing around. The shift needs to be now before later in order to preserve oil deposits and save it for when we learn the true purposes of Oil on the planet.



posted on Sep, 16 2008 @ 12:48 PM
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Originally posted by rjmelter
If Fords haven't been reliable in the past I am sure you could link ot to job growth for Vehicle repair stores and the rising market of auto sales.


Well, actually, I think you'd have an easier time linking it to them getting out competed by cheaper, more reliable import cars.



posted on Sep, 22 2008 @ 08:37 PM
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posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 12:47 AM
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Well think about it like this here, I cannot think of any part of Europe that has sanctions on it. Virtually every city in America has dozens of gas stations that sells diesel.

Anyone who could normally afford this brand new vehicle should have no problem importing it from one of the countries that does not drive backwards. Granted you would have to do a considerable amount of researching and translating, but you should be able to acquire it nonetheless.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 01:31 AM
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Volkswagen will be releasing the Jetta TDI in 2009 in the US, which runs on diesel and is widely reported to get 35-50 MPG (not the EPA reports since they are far from accurate, especially for diesel engines). I don't think anyone can call this car underpowered. Modern diesel is EXTREMELY efficient compared to gasoline. Plus, the TDI has very little harmful emissions. It's a green dream, in my opinion!

It would be nice if Ford would find a way to comply with the diesel standards in America so they could release this new car, however. I'm sure it would be cheaper than the TDI will be. Orrrrr--the US could shape up and reform the diesel standards for modern times.

EDIT: I read the article, and it says that the Fiesta would sell for around $25,000...about the same as the VW TDI. Sorry Ford, Volkswagen makes a much better car


[edit on 9/23/2008 by iceofspades]



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 03:22 AM
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reply to post by rjmelter
 


Well you see, the motor of the thing isn't really anything special. It's not noteworthy fuel efficient, thermally. It's probably better than most car engines, but I couldn't say for sure. It could actually have a lower thermal efficiency; generally a larger engine means a more thermally efficient engine, the most efficient engines are huge stationary ones used as power plants. What's important is that it's very small, so it uses very little fuel. If you tried to use it to power your home, you'd not be able to run much at all in the way of appliances. Powering homes takes, well, raw power. Getting insane fuel efficiency takes a very small, weak motor and a very light, aerodynamic car. The two goals are almost entirely at ends to each other.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:18 AM
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reply to post by mdiinican
 


Ford cars in Europe are far better than their US equivalents. Build quality, performance - the lot. Don't compare the two



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:31 AM
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Originally posted by mdiinican
Back in the 80s, some models of CRX could get 40-41 miles per gallon, and those were gasoline-fueled and actually pretty sprightly. ...


Back in '89, I bought a 1985 Honda CRX HF. It got 50 miles to the gallon. Although there was a lot to like about the car, "sprightly" wasn't a word I would use to describe it. I would have to work hard to outrun a semi from a standing start.


On the other hand, I also had a Dodge Daytona Turbo that got 30 miles to the gallon. I smoked many a V-8 at the stoplight with that little 4 banger.


Oh, one other thing. Some engineer recently was playing with his Ford Mustang. He was getting 85mpg, running something like 450 HP. He said he will start selling his motor when he gets to 100mpg. I'm betting he is "suicided" before then.

[edit on 23-9-2008 by sir_chancealot]



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 08:38 AM
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Audi 1.9 and 2l diesel TDi engines are stunning and certainly not slow

and if you want economy AND real power, get the A8 3L twin turbo diesel, 40+ MPG and will blow your socks off


And Audi have won le mans for the last 3 years with diesels



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by mdiinican
 


Some of this is correct, however for a personal reference I drive a 2002 Camaro Z28, it weighs around 3700 pounds, and I average about 28 mpg driving 50/50 city/highway. Now this is with a 346 cu. in. V8 engine with 450 horsepower. It's all about the power to weight ratio.



posted on Sep, 23 2008 @ 12:49 PM
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Definitely. Audi's are beautiful cars. Volkswagen uses Audi engines, for those looking for a cheaper version



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by rjmelter
 

Actually, it's not 'the 65 MPG Ford car that the U.S. cannot have', is it?

It's the 65mpg Ford car Americans do not want.



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 05:15 AM
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Most Americans are afraid to drive a little car because all the Politicians would run you over in their gas guzzling Hummers that the taxpayers supply the fuel for !



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 05:42 AM
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A guy at work has a 04 Dodge full size 4 door 4x4 truck that gets over 50 mpg and runs 10 second quarter miles. It does about 160 mph top and dynos out at over 500hp. Being hand built he doesn't have to meet EP standards. He has a 40' 5th wheel for hauling horses and it drops it to about 30 mpg when loaded . It caan be done he is setting up a website and will be selling kits by the first of the year.

mikell



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 06:29 AM
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reply to post by mikellmikell
 


Will your "friend" give me a full refund if I purchase his "kit" which is probably a Hydrogen generator like everyone else is selling and I can prove it does not work as stated? This would be backed by dynomometer tests as well as data logs from the power train control module? Every test I've seen with one of those "contraptions" have yielded no gains to very very minimal gains. Also 500 HP in that large of a truck is not nearly enough horsepower to run a 10 second quarter mile. You would need at least 700-800 to get close.

[edit on 24-9-2008 by bigshow]



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 12:26 PM
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It perhaps could be changed (the title) However The play on words were their on purpose and were pretty accurate. The U.S. cannot have it because Americans do not want it. Our Ignorance is keeping us from progressing as a people.

This Car would help many poor and middle class Americans yet they would rather buy SUV'S and only get 19-28 miles per gallon. Ignorance Ignorance America.

[edit on 24-9-2008 by rjmelter]



posted on Sep, 24 2008 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by bigshow
reply to post by mikellmikell
 


Will your "friend" give me a full refund if I purchase his "kit" which is probably a Hydrogen generator like everyone else is selling and I can prove it does not work as stated? This would be backed by dynomometer tests as well as data logs from the power train control module? Every test I've seen with one of those "contraptions" have yielded no gains to very very minimal gains. Also 500 HP in that large of a truck is not nearly enough horsepower to run a 10 second quarter mile. You would need at least 700-800 to get close.

[edit on 24-9-2008 by bigshow]


It is if you use Jap technology.



posted on Nov, 20 2008 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by sir_chancealot
 


re:ford 5.0 liter mustang, back in the mid 80s, the 5.0 got 29mpg in stock configuration...what went wrong?

When US automakers get serious about giving the American people good products...this is when I will get serious about purchasing an American car. Until then...i'll stick to Japanese or European cars.

You can't convince me to purchase a turd.




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