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If you're teleported, do you die?

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posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 06:29 PM
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Agreed. That's what I meant by "Quantum portal " ect. By moving through time space to alternate points in a space time continuum nothing is destructed and or reconstructed. The soul doesn't have to worry about keeping up with the energy/matter of the body and vice versa.




posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 06:39 PM
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As of right now, our current method of teleportation is actually a 3d map of the object, and reconstituting it with like material.

So...its a clone.


just sortof scary.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by Holygamer
 

Actually I think it is more like quantum movement of photons. Here is a link.Teleportation Breakthrough made"
I believe there a couple of earlier threads on this.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 06:57 PM
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hmm. Interesting link.

Question is though, if your broken down and reassembled....are you still you? I mean...hmm.

I guess theres no limit to resuscitation, right? Given theres no decay and breakdown, if it were possible to revive a body 1,000 years in the future, it would still be you.

I just wonder if that applies if your broken into millions of pieces and flung across the galaxy.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by Holygamer
If you were in a teleporter, and you were teleported. Did you just die? and make a clone of yourself?


Depends on what kind of teleporter you use.

If you use the old fashioned, disassemble and reassemble your molecules elsewhere version, then you'd essentially be destroying yourself and creating a duplicate in the new location.

The newer type teleporters don't do that, though. They work by creating an isolated pocket of virtual space (isospace) around you, then vectoring you past normal spacetime to get to your destination. Like taking a fly embedded in an ice cube and throwing it into the water. It drops out of real spacetime at one point, then pops back up to the surface somewhere/sometime else, depending on the speed and direction you throw it. Nothing is destroyed, and energy is conserved.

If you have a choice, I say pick the latter.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 07:24 PM
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yeah Ithink I'd rather take the later aswell.

just a scary prospect.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by Holygamer
If you were in a teleporter, and you were teleported. Did you just die? and make a clone of yourself?

If so, will there be a day when people voluntarily (and ignorantly) destroy themselves, ceasing to be, and creating clones to live out their existence?


I think the whole idea behind the project is that if you are teleported from one location to another is that your atomic breakdown or DNA not sure what the smallest measurable unit is for humans but ultimately that data is transferred from one location to another thus probably erasing memory and motor skills unless the human brain can be coded as well and maintain it's data.


the cool thing about this is being entombed into something like in the old mars attacks or dinosaur attack trading cards.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 10:28 PM
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So even though every cell in your body has died, and you are a clone several thousand times over at this point, somehow repeating the entire process, only artificially, will kill you?

Eh..



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 10:57 PM
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Darn it. (One line post and really off-topic) You guys make my head hurt sometimes. Bad. Darn my analytical mind.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 11:52 PM
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Teletransportation will require for the individual to move his/her consciousness to the location of the "reassemble" body (the human genome project hopefully will allow us to learn how to store information in organic form) counting that by then we have figured how to transmit information in a quantum level.

This problem will not be solved by designing a device; it will require a new set of skills for the subject being transported. I will argued that this is possible; if one can drive and have a conversation over the cell phone, then perhaps one day we would be able to shift our consciousness "some place" else while your physical body is being relocated. Shifting your consciousness to be present in the conversation, while your "body" takes control of the car almost in autopilot, could be seen as a small example. The body does have an autonomous system; however the car is not part of it. After a while of driving the same car or the same roads the car becomes a tool, an extension of the body. Perhaps by the time we develop the technology required to send the entire encyclopedia of your physical body through a quantum wave, humans would have achieved how to do the same with their consciousness.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 11:54 PM
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The interesting thing about Star Trek transporters is the writers never actually tell the audience how they work. It can't produce a clone since, it seems to me, the matter to make the clone has to come from somewhere else...assuming of course, the original me is ripped to subatomic shreds so the transporter knows what to make at point B.

Now, I CAN imagine a point in time, at about the same time we discover faster-than-light travel, a spin off science for transporting matter might emerge.



posted on Mar, 13 2008 @ 11:54 PM
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Okay, I GOTTA ask...does the "you" at point B qualify as a clone if it's made from the SAME matter at point A, and the "you" at point B is an atom by atom reconstruction? If on the other hand, assuming the "you" at point B is made from matter found at point B, what happens to the you at point A?

I think in the second situation, you do infact die, whatever the perception "you" at point B might have. The first situation does have me stumped though.

[edit on 14-3-2008 by Toelint]



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by Iblis
 


yeah but the difference is only certain cells die in your body. I'm under the impression none of your brain cells die and replicate.

So my skin, and organs, may have been cloned, but my brain (the thing thats me) has never died. otherwise I would cease to be



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 12:14 AM
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reply to post by Toelint
 


Person B would have all the memories of you, and have the memory of going in the teleporter, but infact its first existence would've been coming out the end.

As for Person A. They would remember stepping in. And then nothing again, ever.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 01:30 AM
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I've thought about this before to, and it lead me to wonder:

How do you know your consciousness isn't destroyed and replaced by a new one every time you go to sleep... Well good night.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by Nightmare0
 


Well it is, in a way.

But you are your brain, so it may reboot itself, but as long as your physical matter is alive and well, you exist.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 02:29 AM
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I wonder who the first crazy bastard will be that steps into something like that.....You would have too be nuttier than a mouse poop in a peanut factory.....that is a great question to think about!



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 03:16 AM
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It seems to me (from what I’ve come across over the years) that the mind is physical. Memories and skills are constructed physically with physical neural pathways. The physical network of your brain makes up you. So, if you are reconstructed at point B with enough accuracy, your clone may in fact be able to start its life from were you left off when you were physically destroyed and therefore killed at point A.
But, life is sustained through electrical activity, each moment taken its queue from the last. It is completely dynamic. What I'm trying to get at is there may have been a perfect clone made at point B, but it may be completely inactive (dead). A large percentage (possibly almost all) of the newly constructed cells making up the clone would have to be brought to life, as well as the whole nervous and repertory systems. As far as I know, at this point in time, it is impossible to revive a brain that has come to a complete and utter stop. So starting a newly constructed one that has never before functioned may be a very difficult technical obstacle.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 03:32 AM
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Originally posted by Holygamer
If you were in a teleporter, and you were teleported. Did you just die? and make a clone of yourself?


YOU are not the matter you are made up of. YOU are the energy cycles within that matter and your personalized consciousness cycles of thought and spirit energy.



posted on Mar, 14 2008 @ 04:24 AM
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biology.about.com...

Many areas of the brain, including the hippocampus regenerate, to an affect.



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