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Live Riot blog from Burma with Pictures

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posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 06:48 AM
link   
Article about Gambari's progress.




THE UN envoy charged with bringing peace to Burma has paid a second visit to pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi today.

Ibrahim Gambari had already met Myanmar’s military leader Senior Gen Than Shwe in the junta’s remote new capital, Naypyitaw, in his quest to end their crackdown on democracy protesters.

The meeting with Than Shwe was expected but the one with Suu Kyi came as a surprise, raising hopes that Gambari’s shuttle diplomacy was making some progress.


More at the link provided, though still no details of the discussions.
Apparently the curfew has been reduced by two hours.




posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 06:50 AM
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An injured monk has been removed from hospital by police.
More here




The monk, assumed to be aged around 30, was sent to Rangoon general hospital’s intensive care unit with a gunshot wound to his arm. Two members of the National League for Democracy in Thingangyun township, Ko Mya Than Htike and U Htun Shwe, and another unknown civilian were also sent to the hospital.

Ko Mya Than Htike’s wife told DVB that all four patients were shot and wounded during the government guards’ violent crackdown on protesters near Sule Pagoda on September 27 and were later taken to the hospital by civilian bystanders. She said the monk was seen being taken away from the hospital ward by police officers on Saturday morning.

“Now the monk is gone. We don’t where he was taken to. He had a plaster-cast on his arm where he has the gun-shot wound. It was police officials who took him away,” said Ko Mya Than Htike’s wife.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 06:57 AM
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Belgium is opening investigations into crimes against humanity involving the junta regime. Article




Four refugees accuse the company of having used forced workers offered by the military regime to build a gas pipeline, according to lawyer Alexis Deswaef.

Authorities are also to reopen an investigation into possible crimes against humanity targetting the regime, he said.


Niknayman has also posted a gallery of photos from around the world of protesters supporting the people of Burma. See here

[edit on 2-10-2007 by ilandrah]



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 09:50 AM
link   
(Burmese Standard Time)
4:00 p.m
China orders monasteries not to shelter Burmese monks

Chinese authorities have issued an order to Chinese monks and monasteries on the Sino-Burmese border areas not to shelter Burmese monks, if they flee from Burma. The Chinese authorities also instructed Chinese monks not to cross over to neighbouring Burma.

www.mizzima.com...



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 01:39 PM
link   
www.nationmultimedia.com...

Burma road goes through Beijing
Three hard facts are setting the boundaries for the talks United Nations negotiator Ibrahim Gambari is undertaking as he shuttles between Burma's ruling generals and the detained opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

Published on October 3, 2007


First, despite the heroic leadership of the Buddhist clergy and the pro-democracy community, almost 50 years of military misrule and terror tactics have worn down Burma's people, who will likely find it hard to maintain their defiance without obvious splits among the ruling generals or widespread desertions among ordinary soldiers.

Second, Burma's generals know that they face a stark choice: either maintain power or risk imprisonment, exile, and possible death. In their eyes, this leaves them with virtually no choice but to hold on to power at all costs.

Finally, as long as China provides political, financial, and military support for Burma's rulers, it will be all but impossible for any meaningful change to occur. Until China decides that it has more to gain from a more legitimate government in Burma than it does from the current incompetent military regime, little can happen.

China's decision to block the UN Security Council from condemning the Burmese regime's assault on the Buddhist monks and other peaceful protestors underscores its long-standing political support for the junta. This past January, China, alongside Russia, vetoed a Security Council resolution that condemned Burma's human rights record and called on the government to stop attacks on ethnic minorities, release political prisoners, and begin a transition towards national reconciliation and democracy. For years, China has also blocked meaningful sanctions against Burma.

China's economic ties to Burma's rulers are strategically important for both sides. Annual bilateral trade, estimated at $1.1 billion - a huge figure, given Burma's total GDP of $9.6 billion - provides an economic lifeline for the Burmese government. China is also Burma's largest military supplier.

At the same time, the $2 billion oil pipeline that China is seeking to build from Burma's southern coast to China's Yunnan province will allow China to get Middle East oil to its southern provinces more easily and securely. When completed, the pipeline will make China much less susceptible to foreign military pressure in the event of international conflict.

So the stakes in Burma are high for China, as are Chinese fears of about how any future "national reconciliation" government might react to China's record of complicity with the corrupt military rulers.

It should be remembered that America and its allies, faced with strategic fears of a similar type during the Cold War, also supported repugnant and oppressive regimes in places like Zaire, Chile and Indonesia. But America and the West did, at key turning points, realise that times had changed so much that these dictators had outlived their usefulness. Thus, despots like Ferdinand Marcos in the Philippines and Chun Doo-hwan in Korea were jettisoned, because the price of supporting their despicable regimes became greater than the benefits.

In today's Internet age, the costs of China's support for Burma's generals are rising fast. Just as in Darfur, where China's perceived support for the Sudanese government translated into harsh criticism and threats to brand the 2008 Olympics the "Genocide Games", China's backing of the Burmese generals, particularly if the death toll rises, could cause similar problems. Indeed, an Olympic boycott will become more likely if scenes of murdered or brutalised Buddhist monks are flashed around the world. Moreover, Burma's public health woes and drug and human trafficking are increasingly being exported to southern China.

Although China has expressed some vague concerns over the crisis to the Burmese government, it has not taken any action that could meaningfully af



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 05:06 PM
link   
From burmamyanmargenocide.blogspot.com...

Few pieces, there is more to read.

1974 Monks and Nuns to send to Bawathit Prison

minzaw: 1974 monks and nuns being arrested at Insein GTI are now scheduled to be sent to Bawathit Prison, Kabaw Valley, Sagaing Division. Details unknown. Activists encourage for possible reporters to keep an aye on all these detention centers. Current satellite images requested.

Are there cracks in the Leadership?

Ko Hla: All Light Infantry Division (LID) commanders are detained in NayPyiTaw by Than Shwe. Only battalion commanders are left in the battalions. LID 33 Commander, Brigadier-General Min Zaw and LID 99 Commander, Brigadier-General Hla Tun Ooo are reportedly removed from the post for not accepting his order. The commanders are in favor of restraint while Than Shwe is in favor of opening fire on the protestors.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 07:44 PM
link   
Red Capitalism blog has a link to a video showing beatings.





Wednesday, 3 October 2007
Live footage beatings Burma

CNN possesses video material of beatings in Burma. The video contains violent beatings, while bystanding soldiers are laughing.

Please be aware, the video shows violent images which are not suitable for everybody.

Watch the video here



I am currently having some internet issues and have not yet watched the video



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 07:46 PM
link   
Red Capitalism blog has a link to a video showing beatings.





Wednesday, 3 October 2007
Live footage beatings Burma

CNN possesses video material of beatings in Burma. The video contains violent beatings, while bystanding soldiers are laughing.

Please be aware, the video shows violent images which are not suitable for everybody.

Watch the video here



I am currently having some internet issues and have not yet watched the video



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 07:49 PM
link   
The famous Burmese actor Kyaw Thu and his wife have safely reached the border.
Link to article



Kyaw Thu had been running from authorities after a public show of support for the protesting monks. Along with the Burmese comedian Zarganar, he had gathered together celebrities to supply the monks at the Shwedagon pagoda with food and water. "We are Buddhist. All Buddhists have to support this movement," the movie heart-throb said.


Zarganar was arrested.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 08:13 PM
link   
A little more on the investigation into the Japanese journalists death.
Article here




Video footage smuggled out of the country, however, appears to show a soldier shooting Nagai from about a meter away.

Assistant press secretary for Japan's foreign ministry, Kazuyuki Yamazaki, says Tokyo hopes the video footage will shed light on what happened.

"We are also referring that scene to the Myanmar government and we would like to receive their official account of why the Japanese journalist had to be killed," he said.

During the meetings, Yabunaka requested authorities return a small video camera Nagai was clutching as he died. The camera was missing from items returned by Burmese authorities.

Yamazaki said the Japanese envoy also called for Burma's military government to stop its violent crackdown and release the arrested demonstrators.

Japanese officials have said Japan may take strong steps against Burma. But Yamazaki says Tokyo has not yet come to a decision about imposing sanctions.





Japan is a top aid donor to Burma, providing about $26 million annually in recent years.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 08:21 PM
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Burmese Prime Minister dies. Article here




(Burmese Standard Time)
10:00 p.m
Burmese Prime Minister pass away

Burma's ailing Prime Minister Lt-Gen Soe Win has died at the military hospital in Mingalardon, Rangoon on Tuesday, sources said.

Soe Win, who returned to Burma on Monday from a secret medical treatment in Singapore, died at about 5:00 p.m (local time), sources added.

The Burmese Prime Minister is known to have been suffering from Leukemia and had secretly received medical treatment in Singapore.

Soe Win, who is a Senior General Than Shwe loyalist, is also known as "the Butcher of Depayin" for orchestrating the Depayin massacre in 2003 by ordering mobs to attack on pro-democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi's motorcade.

Sources said Soe Win will be replaced by Lt-Gen Thein Sein and Tin Aung Myint Oo will be promoted to Thein Sein's position as Secretary-I.


That's the entire article for now.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 08:58 PM
link   
from mizzima.com


(Burmese Standard Time)
4:00 p.m
China orders monasteries not to shelter Burmese monks

Chinese authorities have issued an order to Chinese monks and monasteries on the Sino-Burmese border areas not to shelter Burmese monks, if they flee from Burma. The Chinese authorities also instructed Chinese monks not to cross over to neighbouring Burma.


wtf!?



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 09:09 PM
link   
reply to post by ljubljana
 


That was to be expected ljubljana, China really doesn't want to be involved in any of this. They were pressured into stating disgust and calling for restraint, but Burma is an important trade link for the chinese.
China is also (I think) concerned about being viewed as hypocritical, they treat their own people very badly and a lot of people around the world wish for them to relinquish their claim on Tibet.
It is very complicated for them, and even if it weren't they typically try to disassociate themselves from interfering with the policies of other countries.

I have recieved another update from avaas - they will be running a series of ads to attempt to get more people aware of the Burmese situation and to get them to sign the petition.



Our emergency petition to stop the crackdown on peaceful protesters in Burma is exploding, with nearly 500,000 signers from every nation of the world. But the situation in Burma remains desperate, with reports of hundreds of monks being massacred and tortured. Burma's rulers have also killed and expelled international journalists, cutting off global media coverage of their cruelty.

China is still the key - the country with the most power to halt the Burmese generals' reign of terror. We're delivering our message this week with a massive ad campaign in major newspapers, beginning with a full page ad in the Financial Times worldwide tomorrow, and in the South China Morning Post on Thursday. The strength of the ad comes from the number of petition signers listed – can we reach our goal of 1 million signatures this week? The link to sign the petition and view the ad is below, forward this email to all your friends and family!

www.avaaz.org...

China continues to provide key economic and military support to Burma's dictatorship, but it has been openly critical of the crackdown. Now we need the government to match words with actions. Our ad paints a powerful moment of choice for China in its relationship with the world – will it be a responsible and respected member of the global community, or will it be associated with tyranny and oppression?

People power, on the streets of Burma, and around the world, can triumph over tyranny. Our strength is in our numbers, spread the word!

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Ben, Graziela, Pascal, Galit and the whole Avaaz team.




posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 09:09 PM
link   
reply to post by ljubljana
 


That was to be expected ljubljana, China really doesn't want to be involved in any of this. They were pressured into stating disgust and calling for restraint, but Burma is an important trade link for the chinese.
China is also (I think) concerned about being viewed as hypocritical, they treat their own people very badly and a lot of people around the world wish for them to relinquish their claim on Tibet.
It is very complicated for them, and even if it weren't they typically try to disassociate themselves from interfering with the policies of other countries.





[edit on 2-10-2007 by ilandrah]



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 09:10 PM
link   
I have recieved another update from avaas - they will be running a series of ads to attempt to get more people aware of the Burmese situation and to get them to sign the petition.



Our emergency petition to stop the crackdown on peaceful protesters in Burma is exploding, with nearly 500,000 signers from every nation of the world. But the situation in Burma remains desperate, with reports of hundreds of monks being massacred and tortured. Burma's rulers have also killed and expelled international journalists, cutting off global media coverage of their cruelty.

China is still the key - the country with the most power to halt the Burmese generals' reign of terror. We're delivering our message this week with a massive ad campaign in major newspapers, beginning with a full page ad in the Financial Times worldwide tomorrow, and in the South China Morning Post on Thursday. The strength of the ad comes from the number of petition signers listed – can we reach our goal of 1 million signatures this week? The link to sign the petition and view the ad is below, forward this email to all your friends and family!

www.avaaz.org...

China continues to provide key economic and military support to Burma's dictatorship, but it has been openly critical of the crackdown. Now we need the government to match words with actions. Our ad paints a powerful moment of choice for China in its relationship with the world – will it be a responsible and respected member of the global community, or will it be associated with tyranny and oppression?

People power, on the streets of Burma, and around the world, can triumph over tyranny. Our strength is in our numbers, spread the word!

With hope and determination,

Ricken, Paul, Ben, Graziela, Pascal, Galit and the whole Avaaz team.




posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 10:44 PM
link   
It seem that myanmar government will do anything to keep their power.They had killed monks and citizens.They had lied in their national news that everything is normal.They had lied to Japan government that the japanese reporter was killed accidently.They had lied to the whole world again and again.But we burmese people had try all our best to prove that what the whole world had seen and known are all the lies.But is there anything we can do now?Such as calling International help to charges against Myanmar Government for their brutal killing?Please give us some advise.

[edit on 2-10-2007 by ForPeacenJustice]



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 11:15 PM
link   
Arrests continue




YANGON (Reuters) - Myanmar's junta arrested more people under the cover of darkness on Wednesday despite a crescendo of international outrage during a keenly watched U.N. mission to bring an end to a bloody crackdown on protests.

At least eight truckloads of prisoners were hauled out of downtown Yangon, the former Burma's biggest city and centre of monk-led protests against decades of military rule and deepening economic hardship, witnesses said.

In one house near the Shwedagon Pagoda, the holiest shrine in devoutly Buddhist Myanmar and starting point for last week's rallies, only a 13-year-old girl remained. Her parents had been taken in the middle of the night, she said.

There was no word on where the prisoners were being taken or how many they would join. Paulo Sergio Pinheiro, the United Nations' human rights envoy for Myanmar, said in Geneva the number of those detained was now in the thousands.


More at link above



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by ForPeacenJustice
 


I think maintaining pressure will eventually lead somewhere. The main thing is not to allow the rest of the world to forget or to turn a blind eye to events there.
Keep the pressure on other countries governments to do something about it.
This is the only way that anything will be achieved without a civil war, and it will take time, the junta have been condemned by their violence, using violence against them will not help.
Any sympathy from other governments would be lost if the violence was returned with violence.
More and more people are becoming aware of the situation there, and raising their voices in protest. Surely, this cacophony can not be ignored.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 11:27 PM
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Petition to nominate the Burmese monks for the Nobel Peace Prize.




While we do not seek to pressure the Committee into giving the prize to the monks, we do hope our letter has raised a unique opportunity for the Committee to recognize what is fast become the symbol of conscience of our times. We realize that taking such a step would be a dramatic departure from the strict nominating procedure. However, we feel that if the Burmese monks could risk their lives to break the junta’s draconian laws and prove the power of peace, then the Norwegian Nobel Committee could certainly make an exception to the Nobel statutes for such an extraordinary group of peacemakers. Indeed, the Burmese sangha would comfortably fit in with the most celebrated prior prize recipients, including Elie Wiesel, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Dali Lama, Martin Luther King, and, of course, Aung San Suu Kyi.



posted on Oct, 3 2007 @ 02:07 AM
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thats just brurtal!!! I really hope the UN imposes some kind of sanctions that will affect the millitary there in particular



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