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Cascades - Disturbing Activity at St Helens & Rainier!!

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posted on Oct, 13 2005 @ 08:44 PM
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you said -- One thing I found interesting, not sure if it is worth mentioning, but he sent a copy of what you read to over 50 other people. I recognised some of the names as volconologists. I am not sure why he would have sent this to so many people.


I think it is worth mentioning - and I think it is interesting -- wonder if any of them will show up here as a new member to see what we all are saying. Not that I have a high opinion of our opinions or anything


Good e-mail and thnaks for sending it - am surprised by the speed of the reply also.




posted on Oct, 13 2005 @ 09:22 PM
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Mount St Helens webcam:
www.fs.fed.us...



Growth of the new lava dome inside the crater of Mount St. Helens continues, accompanied by low rates of seismicity, low emissions of steam and volcanic gases, and minor production of ash. During such eruptions, changes in the level of activity can occur over days to months.

All other volcanoes in the Cascade Range are all at normal levels of background seismicity. These include Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, and Mount Adams in Washington State; Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Three Sisters, Newberry, and Crater Lake, in Oregon; and Medicine Lake, Mount Shasta, and Lassen Peak in northern California.
vulcan.wr.usgs.gov...


USGS earthquake map for US:
earthquake.usgs.gov...



posted on Oct, 14 2005 @ 04:43 AM
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mrsdudara,

Way Above Vote for you! Thank you so much for taking that initiative and then sharing the response with us. And his reply does make me feel better as it appears this is just something Rainier does every once in a while (grandfather has gas
). It's also interesting to find out about their eruption software. THAT's a new one! Maybe some one will come talk to us.

to you mrs!



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 07:28 PM
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yesterday and today, seems to be a lot of activity:
www.pnsn.org...



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 07:58 PM
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holy crap, TA! I just don't know whether to accept this is just "background activity" or not. It sure seems a bit more than should be, to me at least.



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 08:00 PM
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Yeah, you see the one from today?

www.pnsn.org...

Doesn't appear to be letting up.



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by TrueAmerican
Yeah, you see the one from today?

www.pnsn.org...

Doesn't appear to be letting up.


Still looking like harmonic tremors to me, indicating magma intrusion. Man,............ we all know Rainier is going to erupt catastrophically eventually, hope we don't see it soon



posted on Oct, 16 2005 @ 08:24 PM
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Great post, mrsdudara


from the email - R. B. Trombley:

most of us in the volcano business consider Mt. Rainier to be the single most dangerous volcano in the United States today

Currently, Eruption Pro 10.6 has forecasted Mt. Rainier with a 12.94% probability of eruption for year 2005 with current data loaded. Of course this probability calculation can increase (or decrease) with additional data on seismic, deformation, thermal, etc.



There is an excellent WikiPedia entry about Mt.Rainier here: WikiPedia: Mount Rainier


Hazard map. Click picture for bigger version



posted on Oct, 17 2005 @ 07:16 AM
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That's a really cool map showing the potential Pyroclastic flow areas. I'm keeping an eye on this, but personally I'm a little skeptical as to whether or not we're going to see something catastrophic.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 04:58 PM
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Hey, look guys! MSH had lava flow!!!










posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:00 PM
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Hello everyone. This is my first post to ATS. Ive been following this topic for a month now and i enjoy reading what everyone has to say. I have been very interested in Mt. Rainer since I have moved here due to the fact I live so close to her. I found this awesome satelite phote of Mt. Rainer that I thought everyone might enjoy.


Link



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:01 PM
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a lava flow in this current atmosphere of tectonic activity is a good thing right? It should help relieve some stress without a "BIG BANG" type of eruption right?

I hope.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:08 PM
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seattlescot,

Welcome to ATS and thank you for sharing the link!



Originally posted by worldwatcher


a lava flow in this current atmosphere of tectonic activity is a good thing right? It should help relieve some stress without a "BIG BANG" type of eruption right?

I hope.


Please keep saying that until we both believe it...ok?



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:18 PM
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check out this site from this morning -- it is earlier than your pics but it shows some red breaking thru

MSH 10/18/05 am

it was the best of the shots from this morning because it was a bit darker so you could see the contrast



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:37 PM
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That's a really good shot justme. I don't think it's a really good indicator of pressure relief though. I think it's more of a curiousity as Mt St.Helens has always been an 'explosive' type as opposed to the Hawaiian 'oozing' type of volcano, I still believe Rainier is the most pressing one to watch since it's been quite some time since she's (he's?) erupted.



posted on Oct, 18 2005 @ 05:56 PM
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Any indication on how often these lava events occur?



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 05:41 AM
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Mainer,

That's the first one I've seen. I don't know if this occurs every once in a while or not.

Concerning Rainier,

See the event at the bottom of this webicorder trace:

www.pnsn.org...

That would be Camp Sherman about 4:06 PT yesterday evening. No USGS event around that time so it's not a Cali or Alaskan quake. Also, it is definitely an ELP, so it's hot MAWGMA moving about accompanied with a couple of good burps - significant rock cracking???

and then we had another good run of an ELP starting just after 1 PT this morning:

www.pnsn.org...

Same type of stuff on the latest Camp Muir webicorder:

www.pnsn.org...



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by seattlescott
Hello everyone. This is my first post to ATS. Ive been following this topic for a month now and i enjoy reading what everyone has to say. I have been very interested in Mt. Rainer since I have moved here due to the fact I live so close to her. I found this awesome satelite phote of Mt. Rainer that I thought everyone might enjoy.


Link


Hi seattle, and thanks for the link. It brings up a good point. Here is another photo of Rainier. This was taken by Nasa in September of 1994. Compare it to the photo on seattle's link. Anyone else see a difference?




It must be getting kind of warm for that glacier to melt like that. Dont you think?



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 09:13 AM
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Actually mrsdudara, to me that more recent picture just looks like it's from a different angle. I can't make out the surrounding features well enough to really say for sure one way or the other though.



posted on Oct, 19 2005 @ 07:18 PM
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Here is a cool shot comparing MSH close up from 10/3/05 to 10/18/05 How does that go -- Pictures say a thousand words.

comparison

at least I think it is dramatic.






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