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Is this a new species of bird?

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posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 05:51 PM
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It does seem as if the hardness of the beak comes out and covers its face like a mask.


That truly is an odd bird. I can't think of anything that looks like that.
Perhaps a new species?

I dunno if its a new species or not, all I know is that I can't identify it.




posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by Stari
The first image I posted of this bird shows that it has a mask looking face. Is there any species out there that has a mask looking face?


I think the reason the bird has a mask looking face is because its plumage has not fully developed yet. That is also indicated by the yellowish fuzzy down on top of its head. This really looks to be a very young bird that, as often happens, tried to fly a little too early or fell out of the nest.



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:19 PM
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Originally posted by Voidmaster

Perhaps a new species?



This is what I keep hearing here. Is there anyone here with alot of knowledge on birds? Voidmaster do you know birds?

Like I have said, I have only been really watching them for about 2 years now. So I don't know anything about them except I know this one looks like no other bird I have ever seen before in this area.



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:29 PM
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Originally posted by SkyWay

I think the reason the bird has a mask looking face is because its plumage has not fully developed yet. That is also indicated by the yellowish fuzzy down on top of its head.


This bird had no yellow fuzzy on the top of it's head, maybe a dark grey. Other than that this bird was completely black.

I stood outside with it for almost 10 minutes and it was never scared of me at all. I had enough time to get a really good look at it.



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:33 PM
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I have a limited knowledge on UK wildlife, so don't think I will be too much help.

I certainly believe it to be young, I think this would also explain how close you managed to get to it.

It seems to be lacking tail feathers, a further indication of age, but also could be an indication that its been in the wars, which may also explain it not looking quite the way it would normally.

I'll have to do a bit of looking around to see if I can identify the species.

Stari are you familiar with all the local bird species?



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:47 PM
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It may be a fledgeling starling. When they're young they do have two tufts of feathers on their head, and they do have a very short tail.

In any case, here's another forum to query with your picture:
www.birdersworld.com...



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:51 PM
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The mask like appearance is not uncommon among young birds. The bird you photographed has not yet fully grown its plumage around the eyes and that gives it the masked look.

It does appear from the photo you posted that bird has not shed all of its baby down from it head. This is especially apparent in the photo that shows the bird's profile, and when viewed from the front it appears to have fuzzy horns like some owls have.

had to remove the link because it doesn't work

[edit on 11-2-2007 by SkyWay]



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:52 PM
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Shows you how mch I know about birds globally.

I thought starling when I first saw it but was ignorant as to whether the US was Starling territory.

Ironic as they are me favoured bird at the moment, their swarm/ formation flying is something to behold.


[edit on 11-2-2007 by Koka]



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 06:57 PM
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Koka, no I am not familiar with every single species in this area. That is why I was hoping to find out the species here on abovetopsecret.

Thanks Byrd, I will post my pics there too and see what they say.

Skyway, I agree with the horns appearance that made me think it was an owl species. They are not horns though, I believe it is just feathers sticking up. But then again I didn't touch them, but I doubt they were horns.



posted on Feb, 11 2007 @ 08:39 PM
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Ok, I have posted these pictures on a couple of bird forums to see if anyone can identify the species.

If I get any good responses then I will post the conclusions here.

Star



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 08:54 AM
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The short tail feathers and beak shape suggest a back rail Laterallus jamaicensis, although they do not have the head tufts seen in your picture. These are rarely seen in your neck of the woods but perhaps this was an even rarer sighting of one that got roughed up by a local predator. It being in shock may also explain why it didn't react much when you approached. I've found birds in shock are easier to approach and catch.




These rarely fly though so some more info on the bird's behaviour and the habitat you live near would be useful.

Did you see the bird fly into/out of your garden?

How did the bird walk or move about? Could you see the bird's natural position? Was its centre of gravity orientated in a more upright or flat position?

Can you describe what kind of habitats are near where you live? Do you live near wetlands/open water/woods etc? What type of woods/open water?

[edit on 12-2-2007 by Nammu]



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 11:24 AM
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Maybe its an android bird created in step 2 of its evolution into eventually copying the Human species. Before creating a WWIII and only John Conners can save us


Sorry I don't know much about birds, and its kind of creepy. Although it does seem to be of an Owl like group.

[edit on 12-2-2007 by Royal76]



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 12:17 PM
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Hello,

I posted your pictures on a bird identification forum and the general consensus seems to be that this bird is a young European Starling.




posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by CaptainLazy
Hello,

I posted your pictures on a bird identification forum and the general consensus seems to be that this bird is a young European Starling.



Perfect! And the bird on the left also displays the same trace of fuzz on the top of its head that can be seen on the head of the bird in Stari's photo. It's a European Starling touring America.



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 12:40 PM
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Really, you all think that bird looks like the starlings in the external link photo? I don't even think it is similar. The bird in question has a square face and the starling has a pointy face. Maybe we could keep looking at other bird pics and find one that fits a bit more.



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 02:09 PM
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Looks to big to be a young bird. It's body looks very developed unlike some other pictures of young birds and it doesn't really look all that similar to a European Starling (from the pictures I've seen).

Shattered OUT...



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by interestedalways
Really, you all think that bird looks like the starlings in the external link photo? I don't even think it is similar. The bird in question has a square face and the starling has a pointy face. Maybe we could keep looking at other bird pics and find one that fits a bit more.


I completely agree. I actually own many birds and a bird site and none of us can ID this. My members are mostly from the US and Aussie, nonetheless, not too many birds we havent seen.

This has me so puzzled.



posted on Feb, 12 2007 @ 04:51 PM
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Nammu, This bird did not move from the spot you see in the picture. It moved its head and looked at me and looked away several times but that was it. I went inside after almost 10 minutes.

CaptainLazy, the bird forums I posted these pictures on said it is either a starling or a grackel.. no one on them knows for sure. Does the Starling bird only live in Europe?

interestedalways, I agree with you that I have not seen any starling or grackel pictures that even come close to this bird.

Little One, thanks for helping me with this mystery. I can see know why this odd bird was driving me crazy trying to think what kind it could possibly be.

Maybe it is a new species. Does this mean I am allowed to name it?
Star



posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 08:04 AM
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The first starling sighted in Ohio was in 1916. Their numbers exploded in the early 1920s until they could be found in all eighty-eight counties. By the end of the decade, flocks of 1,000 - 5,000 birds were commonly seen in the fall. At Buckeye Lake in the 1930s, a flock of over 100,000 was seen. Starlings are now permanent residents in the state, with large flocks of them being seen throughout the year. Ohio has the largest breeding population of starlings in North America.


Source: www.ohiohistorycentral.org...

So yeah, the European Starling is pretty common in Ohio.

Here's another picture. It looks pretty similar but without a higher res photo pretty difficult to say for sure





posted on Feb, 14 2007 @ 09:00 AM
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I believe this is a Saw-Whet or Boreal owl. Most likely very young. I could be wrong on the species of owl, but that is as close as I can get without more detail in coloring around the face and chest. That is a really cool pic! How's come you didn't show it to me sooner?



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