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Please show me a ''real'' pic of saturn.

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posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by selfless

Originally posted by mikesingh
You'll find some pics in the thread here.


Yeah those looks more real then the nasa pics and supprise supprise they have huge ufo activity in them...

I guess this explains why nasa have no real photo's of saturn for the general public.


Selfless... There is a 99.9% chance that those are simply asteroids that have gotten caught in Saturn's gravitational pull and orbit in and around it's rings, only to be eventually discarded at a later time. Plus... If you were not already aware, planets are not perfectly round... Especially moons. Technically, asteroids that are caught in a planets gravitational pull ARE moons. Did you only read the responses in that thread that say ' Yeah, those are definately UFO's, complete with dark crators. ' and completely ignore the multitude of other possible explanations for that picture?

-Felorah-

P.S - Here is a large gallery of hundreds of different pictures of Saturn, taken by hundreds of different people, living hundreds of miles away from eachother, at most. If this isn't convincing enough for you, I suggest maybe you are better off digging a large hole and burying yourself with the worms becuase I'm not the only one who is agitated by your assumptions.

Deviant Art Astrophotography

[edit on 24-10-2006 by Felorah]




posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 11:06 PM
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haha sounds like a bul# topic to me!!!!



posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 11:27 PM
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Originally posted by Felorah

Originally posted by selfless

Originally posted by mikesingh
You'll find some pics in the thread here.


Yeah those looks more real then the nasa pics and supprise supprise they have huge ufo activity in them...

I guess this explains why nasa have no real photo's of saturn for the general public.


Selfless... There is a 99.9% chance that those are simply asteroids that have gotten caught in Saturn's gravitational pull and orbit in and around it's rings, only to be eventually discarded at a later time. Plus... If you were not already aware, planets are not perfectly round... Especially moons. Technically, asteroids that are caught in a planets gravitational pull ARE moons. Did you only read the responses in that thread that say ' Yeah, those are definately UFO's, complete with dark crators. ' and completely ignore the multitude of other possible explanations for that picture?

-Felorah-

P.S - Here is a large gallery of hundreds of different pictures of Saturn, taken by hundreds of different people, living hundreds of miles away from eachother, at most. If this isn't convincing enough for you, I suggest maybe you are better off digging a large hole and burying yourself with the worms becuase I'm not the only one who is agitated by your assumptions.

Deviant Art Astrophotography

[edit on 24-10-2006 by Felorah]


Here's some interesting photo's.

www.thecomingoftan.com...

And your last comment shows to me that you didn't read the whole thread.

I never said that saturn the planet doesn't exist.



Edited: Please don't let me get you agitated, it shouldn't have to matter to you what i personaly think.

[edit on 24-10-2006 by selfless]



posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by TeH PwNeR
haha sounds like a bul# topic to me!!!!


Well then by all means, don't bother coming on here and posting that.



posted on Oct, 24 2006 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by Felorah

Originally posted by selfless

Originally posted by mikesingh
You'll find some pics in the thread here.


Yeah those looks more real then the nasa pics and supprise supprise they have huge ufo activity in them...

I guess this explains why nasa have no real photo's of saturn for the general public.




I would like to point out that i am talking about a close up picture of saturn.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 12:57 AM
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Selfless, I very much applaud your unwillingness to accept mainstream explenations. Very odd things go on all the time, things that can't always be explained away. Your image of a bright object is just another one of those things. Science does not have every answer and that could be some freak thing that we have never seen before.

Onto your not accepting NASA photos as real, don't. Kepp your disbelief but don't be so quick to believe in something unconventional just because it's different then everyone else's thoughts. Don't take any side. Be skeptical, even of your own conclusions. If you wish to get a "true" image of saturn, go out, buy an extremely high-powered telescope and point it in saturn's direction. Either that or launch a probe at it. Until you can, or until you look at it through a telescope, believe nothing, not even your own theories of aliens or spaceships.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 04:46 AM
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Originally posted by wildcat
Now that I think of it, can Saturn cast a shadow over its own rings?


yes it can

source : external website




Average distance from the Sun 1.429×109 km (0.9 billion miles, 9.55 astronomical units)
Orbital eccentricity 0.056
Mean orbital speed 9.64 km/s (6 mi/s)
Sidereal period 29.46 Earth years
Synodic period 378.09 days
Inclination of orbit to the ecliptic 2.49 degrees
Inclination of equator to orbital plane 26.73 degrees
Equatorial rotation period 10 hr 14 min
Rotation period at higher latitudes 10 hr 40 min
Internal rotation period (true period of rotation) 10 hr 39 min 24 s



gives the hard numbers , and a simple graphic[ not to scale ] , i hope shows that saturn can indeed eclipse its own rings .



if that does not answer your query - i would sugest you start a new thread in space exploration or science and technology - to ask specific questions about saturns orbital properties .

hope this helps .



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 06:26 AM
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With regards to actually visiting Saturn, what’s the beef with interstellar travel these days? How long would it take to get there and back? Manned!!!


Please excuse my fundamental lack of knowledge regarding this matter. Last I heard rockets were moving at about 40,000 mph.

It's something you might want to consider selfless.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 08:42 AM
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Follow this link to see raw images of Saturn taken by amateur astronomers. Here is one of many sites with raw images of Saturn.

Also "the box" posted that rockets can go 40,000 mph. Technically, if a rocket had enough fuel, it could approach light speed. With a rocket engine, thrust is constantly increasing. Thrust stops increasing only when fuel is depleted or engines are shut off.




[edit on 10/25/2006 by Jeddyhi]



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 09:16 AM
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I've answered my own question...

If you planning a trip to Saturn selfless, then this is a good place to start.

www.androidpubs.com...



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by selfless
Thanks rosa but i do not think that's a real pic, it looks computor made to me.




Go and purchase a 100 dollar telescope. It wont be hard to spot saturn if you know where too look. You will find that the image shown above is pretty darn close to what you see other than it will be a little smaller.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by JenovaMM
Selfless, I very much applaud your unwillingness to accept mainstream explenations. Very odd things go on all the time, things that can't always be explained away. Your image of a bright object is just another one of those things. Science does not have every answer and that could be some freak thing that we have never seen before.

Onto your not accepting NASA photos as real, don't. Kepp your disbelief but don't be so quick to believe in something unconventional just because it's different then everyone else's thoughts. Don't take any side. Be skeptical, even of your own conclusions. If you wish to get a "true" image of saturn, go out, buy an extremely high-powered telescope and point it in saturn's direction. Either that or launch a probe at it. Until you can, or until you look at it through a telescope, believe nothing, not even your own theories of aliens or spaceships.



Trust me, you wont need to buy an expensive one. Unless you actually want to take the photograph. Then, you might. However thats not my point. Questioning things is ok. Being skeptical is ok. But dont go overboard. For god's sake, get a pair of binoculars and you can see saturn. Pick something else to be skeptical of.

[edit on 25-10-2006 by Sight2reality]



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 02:18 PM
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i'd just like to point out that asking for a close-up pic of Saturn is rather like asking for a close-up pic of Earth. only Saturn's a hell of a lot bigger and less diverse in its surface features.

so any close-up pic you get of saturn is going to be a muddy-looking ochre rectangle, and i can make you one of those in photoshop right now if you like.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by The Parallelogram

so any close-up pic you get of saturn is going to be a muddy-looking ochre rectangle, and i can make you one of those in photoshop right now if you like.



Well i do mean close up but still far enough to see it all if you know what i mean? you can still be close up to it and far enough to see it all.

And for the 10th time or more, i never said that saturn does not exist so people please stop saying it like i am saying saturn doesn't exist.

Many of the same things are being said in this thread like a cycle as a result caused by people not reading it before posting.


And i will say it again, i thanked everyone who gave me some pics and they helped.



posted on Oct, 25 2006 @ 04:39 PM
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Well i do mean close up but still far enough to see it all if you know what i mean? you can still be close up to it and far enough to see it all.


Really? How does that work?

Either you are CLOSE to the image and you can only capture a section of the planet.. or you are far enough away to capture the entire thing.

Here is an exercise to illustrate my point.

Stand 5 feet away from your house and try to take a picture of the ENTIRE house. Now start stepping back and stop when you can clearly see the entirty of your house in one picture.



posted on Oct, 26 2006 @ 05:24 PM
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selfless, this pic has been posted before in the thread, but did you actually look at it?

www.planetary.org...
(note: it's a large file)

This is the most common Cassini picture that's out there. Zoomed out, it does look a bit CGI, but that's due to the very high resolution and lack of detail. Zoom in, and you'll see things that would be difficult to implement with CGI - the bland, and yet not quite featureless or predictable surface, the haze of the atmosphere on the day side and on the inside of the shadow on the rings, and so forth. Of course, this could be faked as CGI, but only with great difficulty Any picture, given enough time and effort, can be done in CGI. Planets are just easier, since they have simple shapes. Gas giants are even easier, since their surfaces are generally featureless.

For more close-up pics, just play around with this:
saturn.jpl.nasa.gov...

Lastly, remember that Cassini's and the Voyagers' main purpose was science, not taking pretty pics. A large pic such as the one I showed takes lots of time, since many smaller pictures have to be stitched together. This time could be used for many other purposes, such as imaging of the rings, moons, imaging in non-visible spectra, etc.

Of course, this kind of answer won't satisfy you, but whatever.



posted on Apr, 1 2007 @ 05:44 AM
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Dear Selfless,

I have read all the topic and I agree completely with you.

Look for example at this image of Mars



NASA buffoons make a lot of computer generated images but we all understand that are faked.
Look at the sky. Where are nuances, color graduations, environmental tones of that incredible red atmosphere of Mars?

Don't you think Spirit is a nice mechanical ostrich, a cartoon character for kids?


Edn

posted on Apr, 2 2007 @ 08:20 AM
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You still going on about this. Did you ever take anyones advice and go to an observatory and look for yourself?



posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by Edn
You still going on about this. Did you ever take anyones advice and go to an observatory and look for yourself?


Are you among those who think to see Saturn with a binocular?


Edn

posted on Apr, 3 2007 @ 01:28 PM
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Originally posted by bigbrain

Originally posted by Edn
You still going on about this. Did you ever take anyones advice and go to an observatory and look for yourself?


Are you among those who think to see Saturn with a binocular?
If you mean have I / am i able to see Saturn through a telescope then yes, I have seen it. I used an 8" reflector in my back garden numerous times and i've seen Saturn in all occasions very clearly rings in all. All I can say is it looks beautiful and its very rewarding seeing it with your own eyes and not just in a picture.






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