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Matrix Bullettime. Is it possible?

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posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 12:29 PM
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I very much doubt you'd be able to dodge bullets, even afetr years of training, they're too fast. The 'skill' could come handy in other situations, if it could ever be trained to that degree, which I doubt. And by the way, everyone perceives time differently. Care to give us some more info on where you found this out from?




posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 01:54 PM
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One of my friends has taken up a 42 year course to become an official samurai. His sensei apparantly can achieve this "CODE RED" and told him about who told me.

I however still remain a bit of a sceptic. I dont see how one can cause onself to go into some self induced state that slows down time. However I'm sure a lot of training will lead to a large increase in hand-eye coordination, reaction-time, etc.

The real question of mine is how one can percieve time as going slower by means of technology. I have heard of new technology that can 'eavesdrop' on neuron connections occuring in the brain and thuse monitor when\how fast these signals occur. However, would it be possible to speed up the rate and speed of these signals and would it aid in the cause mentioned above?



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 01:59 PM
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However, would it be possible to speed up the rate and speed of these signals and would it aid in the cause mentioned above?


Yes it would. Do you know what this technology is? I've heard of a few drugs but nothing even approaching an implant yet. We nearly have the capability to create artificial muscles that are thousands of times faster then our own.

www.newscientist.com...

Add this in with some drugs/implants that speeds up neural processing and you could concievably dodge some types of projectiles, maybe an arrow fired from a compound bow can be dodged. Not sure about bullets though. Lasers definately not.



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 02:46 PM
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Another question: How can one be sure that speeding up neural processing speeds down our perceptions of time? Is it not possible that it speeds it UP?



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 02:55 PM
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Originally posted by SecretMuffinNinja
Another question: How can one be sure that speeding up neural processing speeds down our perceptions of time? Is it not possible that it speeds it UP?


No. The opposite is true actually. When neural processes are slowed down perception of time would also most likely speed up(because your brain isn't processing as much information and you could actually get "frame jumps" from time to time), sort of analogous to the Time Dialation effect when travelling near the speed of light(allthough with that you wouldn't notice that time outside your capsule was speeded up). Just look at high speed film, when you play it back in real time it looks like it's in slow motion as the frames per second is extremely high. There may be a limitation to how much we can slow down the perception of time as there may be some inherint biological limiting factors like our eyes and the speed with which information can pass through the brain.

[edit on 8-1-2006 by sardion2000]

[edit on 8-1-2006 by sardion2000]

[edit on 8-1-2006 by sardion2000]



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by SecretMuffinNinja

Originally posted by masterp
I heard that if you play Max Payne 1 at the most difficult setting with bullet time for 100 hours continously, eventually you get to have bullet time in reality.


Ok really guys lets get a bit serious here


I was serious...why do say that?



posted on Jan, 8 2006 @ 04:01 PM
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Because I find it a bit hard to believe that playing a game allows you to decrease the rate at which you experience time thats all.



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by masterp
I heard that if you play Max Payne 1 at the most difficult setting with bullet time for 100 hours continously, eventually you get to have bullet time in reality.


Is there anyone else that can back this statement up?



posted on Jan, 9 2006 @ 02:11 AM
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I can't back up anything on Max Payne, but I would like to throw my two cents in the fire anyways.

One way I was thinking about this as I was reading through was kind of along the lines of a video game. Every video game, you have a specific frame rate where things happen at, usually pretty fast, and it's in between each frame that the computer does it's processing--moves the AI, responds to your input, decides which sounds to play, etc. A good developer will know that there may be times where they won't get the frame rate they need for everything to look good; one of the work-arounds for this is to go ahead and process everything, but you don't draw the next frame. Everything moved, but you don't see the changes until a frame or two later and everything gets kinda choppy.

I was thinking of this as basically our "computer" (ie brain) can process information at a certain rate. It's able to get a certain amount accomplished before the next bit of data comes--it has a frame rate so to speak. If you're able to up that processing speed, you can make more decisions before that next chunk of data comes in. If you measure time as the rate at which we process data, you've just slowed it down because you're able to process more while taking less time to do it. I hope that makes sense...

Anyways, regardless of this there will be a limit both on reaction time and processing time, due to physical limitations--both of our bodies and of nature in general. It always takes a minimum amount of time for a) information to reach our sensory organs, b) that information to reach our brain, c) that information to bounce around the various neurons to get processed, and d) the results get sent to the necessary body parts. It may be blazingly fast, but light and electricity can only travel up to a certain speed. You also need to take into consideration that the reaction time isn't just input->process->output; when you're moving, your body is constantly sending signals back and forth to the brain to determine whether you've moved too much, not enough, whatever.

I hope some of that made sense somewhere



posted on Jan, 10 2006 @ 06:41 PM
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I think you can percieve a bullet time like expierence in certain situations like life threatening ones because your brain is only focused on a very select few things like the immediate danger and nothing else like it is most of the time.As someone else said I can see how your brain slow things down, but it wouldnt actually slow the bullets or events happening down. I suppose it could be helpful to some degree because it would allow someone to only focus on what's important, and nothing else







 
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