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Is There Anyone Out There Who's Really Offended by Christmas Trees?

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posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 08:56 AM
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Has anybody thought to ask the trees how they feel about being cut down and decorated with crap?




posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 09:00 AM
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Originally posted by Willow_Dryad
Has anybody thought to ask the trees how they feel about being cut down and decorated with crap?


Around these parts, Willow_Dryad, the trees are grown on farms and you would be hard-put to go onto someones bush lot to cut a tree. It's frowned upon as much as going into a park and doing the same.

As to the feelings of the inhabitants of the tree farm...I doubt they feel any different than the corn stalks, wheat stalks or the lettuce in your garden.



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 09:37 AM
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Yup, I asked the tree. He said he didn't mind. Really, they look forward to the Christmas season as they are made to be the centerpiece for the occasion. People bring them into their homes and doll them up really nice. The get a thrill out of it.

I suppose your tree had a dissenting point of view?



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 10:17 AM
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What offends me is the symbological colors chosen for this season , but then
I suppose they do refelec what xianity has become . Especially with the
fundie war cry of take back ... .
Red, Green , Gold , White.
White (also represents silver in hearldry) : pure or purity or wealth
Green : money or wealth
Gold
also Silver) : money , wealth
Red : There are two meanings associated with red that are almost
universal. Im sure there are others also.
Blood and Death





Many faiths observe special days

Even before throwing in holiday parties, the days between Thanksgiving and the end of the Christmas season are crammed with dates to remember -- no matter what your religion.
Here are some of them:

THANKSGIVING: Though not a religious holiday, the day traditionally is a time to give thanks for a bountiful harvest, which yielded a feast. - Tom Van Dyke / Knight Ridder/Tribune


Thursday: Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Sahib, the ninth Sikh teacher. He was beheaded in 1675 for believing in freedom of religion and the right of Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs to practice their own religions.
Thursday: Thanksgiving Day, a nonsectarian holiday celebrated in the United States.
Friday: Feast of Oya, Santerian mother of death and rebirth.
Nov. 26: Day of the Covenant, Baha'i celebration of the promise given in the last will and testament of Baha'u'llah, whom Baha'is consider one of the manifestations of God and the founder of the faith.
Nov. 27: First Sunday in Advent, first of four weeks of Christian preparation for observing the birth of Jesus Christ.
Nov. 28: Ascension of Abdu'l-Baha, Baha'i celebration of the rising of the spirit of Abdul'l-Baha, Baha'u'llah's son and chosen successor, to the heavenly dwelling.
Nov. 30: St. Andrew's Day, Catholic observance of the coming of Christianity to what is now known as Scotland. The martyrdom of Andrew, one of the 12 apostles, is remembered as Advent begins.
Dec. 1: Suijin-Matsuri, Shinto rite honoring the god of water.
Dec. 2-3: Remembrance day -- evening to evening -- for Khadijah, mother of Islam and its first convert, transcriber of the Quran, Prophet Muhammad's wife and partner, and businesswoman, who died in the seventh century.
Dec. 4: Feast of Shango, Santerian rite honoring the deity who defends against evil.
Dec. 6: St. Nicholas Day, in honor of the Catholic priest who lived in the fourth century in present-day Turkey. His legend evolved into Santa Claus.
Dec. 8: Bodhi Day, Buddhist celebration of the time about 2,500 years ago when Siddhartha Gautama took his place under a bodhi tree in India, vowing to remain there until he attained supreme enlightenment.
Dec. 8: Death day of Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, Sufi saint who taught about unity of the soul with the one universal deity of 99 names and attributes. He died in 1111.
Dec. 8: Fast day for Maha Devi, the divine mother of the Hindu world.
Dec. 8: Feast of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin Mary, Catholic celebration of St. Anne's conception of Mary, mother of Jesus.
Dec. 11: Fast day for Vishnu, the Hindu god considered to be preserver of the universe.
Dec. 12: Feast of Masa'il, first day of the 15th month of the Baha'i calendar that focuses on mystery and questions.
Dec. 12: Our Lady of Guadalupe Feast Day, in which Catholics honor the first appearance in 1531 of the mother of God at the former shrine of Aztec Moon Goddess Coatlicue in Mexico.
Dec. 13: St. Lucia's Day, in which Catholics honor a first-century Sicilian woman who blinded herself rather than marrying outside her Christian faith. For some pagans, the day is the Feast of the Light-bringer honoring Juno Lucina, the Roman goddess of light and childbirth.
Dec. 16-24: Las Posadas, a re-enactment in Mexico and some Mexican-American communities of Mary and Joseph's search for an inn in the days before the birth of Jesus.
Dec. 17: Feast of Babalu Aye, Santerian healer of deadly diseases.
Dec. 21: Yule, one of the Sabbats or holidays of the Wiccan calendar. It occurs on the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year, and celebrates the rebirth of the sun god as light begins to return from this day forward.
Dec. 21-Jan. 9: Soyala, Hopi and Zuni new year festival of purification and renewal.
Dec. 22: Festival of Empress Mother Wang-Mu, Taoist festival honoring the mother of compassion and wisdom, and manifestation of the Tao.
Dec. 22: Tohji-Taisai, Shinto rite honoring Sun Goddess Amaterasu, who withdrew into a cave until she was enticed with music and dance after Storm God Susano-o angered her.
Dec. 23: Birthday of Joseph Smith, born in 1805, and founder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as Mormons.
Dec. 24: Christmas Eve, Christian celebration of the arrival of Mary and Joseph in Bethlehem for the birth of Jesus.
Dec. 25: Christmas Day, Christian celebration of the birth of Jesus.
Dec. 26: St. Stephen's Day, Catholic remembrance of St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr. Called Boxing Day in Canada and other British-influenced countries in part because churches opened their alms boxes on that day to distribute the money to the poor.
Dec. 26: Zarathosht Diso, Zoroastrian anniversary of the death of Prophet Zarathushtra about 3,500 years ago.
Dec. 26-Jan. 2: Hanukkah, Jewish Festival of Lights commemorating the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 B.C., after the Maccabees recaptured it from the Hellenist Syrians.
Dec. 26-Jan. 1: Kwanzaa, an African-American and Pan- African holiday celebrating family, community and culture. Many religions now observe Kwanzaa and its highlighting of seven life virtues.
Dec. 27: St. John's Day, Catholic remembrance of the only one of the 12 disciples who did not abandon Jesus during his crucifixion.
Dec. 28: Holy Innocents Day, honoring the memory of male children killed by King Herod in an attempt to destroy Jesus. Also called Holy Family Day.
Dec. 29: Fast day for Shiva, the Hindu god considered to be destroyer of the world.
Dec. 31: Feast of Sharaf, first day of the 16th month of the Baha'i calendar that focuses on honor.
Dec. 31: Feast of Yemaya, Santerian mother of the sun and moon.
Dec. 31: New Year's Eve.
Dec. 31: Omisoka, the final day before the new year. Buddhist and Shinto devotees perform the rite of Oharai to purify their houses and businesses. All that is old is thrown away; and debts, obligations and problems in relationships are settled.
Dec. 31: Watch Night, Christian occasion thanking God for bringing people safely through another year. Created by the U.S. blacks at the time of the emancipation of slaves in 1863.
Jan. 1-3: Shogatsu, Shinto new year festival observed with prayers for inner renewal, prosperity and health. Jan. 1 is known as Gantan-sai or Ganjitsu.
Jan. 1: Feast of St. Basil, Orthodox Christian commemoration of St. Basil the Great, who wrote a Eucharist liturgy that bears his name.
Jan. 1: Mary, Mother of God, Catholics' celebration of the mother of Jesus.
Jan. 1: New Year's Day.
Jan. 5: Twelfth Night, Christian celebration marking the end of Christmas festivities.
Jan. 6: Epiphany, Christian commemoration of the revelation of Jesus' divine nature to the gentiles when the magi paid homage to him with gifts. Also called Dia de los Reyes, Day of the Kings. Orthodox Christians call it the Feast of the Theophany, recalling the revelation of the Holy Trinity in the baptism of Jesus.
Jan. 7: Nativity of Christ, celebration of Jesus' birth for some Orthodox Christians.


[edit on 4-12-2005 by stalkingwolf]



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by Al Davison
I mean, I've seen Christian households with "Nativity Scenes" that included Santa bowing down to the baby Jesus in the manger! I'm still laughing about that!




I had heard of such a thing--never seen it, though...

Until today, that is.
Anyone who is in need of such a holiday embellishment, they can be had for less than 8 bones right here!



[edit on 12/4/2005 by queenannie38]



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by queenannie38
they can be had for less than 8 bones right here!





A true reminder of 'the reason for the season'.

Oh, wow...and here I thought 3 wise men coming to pay respects were a much more profound 'reason for the season'.

But, then...I suppose there being 'wise men' prior to the baby Jesus might be a little provocative.

Well, this happy heretic just put up the tree and decorated it this afternoon...and guess what....?

That's right...no Kneeling Santa.

No gifts yet either...it looks so barren under there right now.



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 01:37 PM
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Originally posted by masqua
No gifts yet either...it looks so barren under there right now.


Ahh...but the greatest gift you and I both have, and indeed all of us, is already wrapped up in our skin!

It's called the 'capacity to love.'

Merry love-fest to the whole lot of ya!



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by Thomas Crowne
I have a Christmas tree phobia. Here's why:



Thomas get yourself a fake Christmas tree they are much safer. I have one and is so old that the weight of the ornaments it makes it lean to one side.


But I will not get a new one for anything in the world because is 7 feet tall.


I do not like fresh trees because is a waste of trees, call me a Greeny if you like

I love Christmas trees, Christmas songs and everything Christmas, specially the shopping.



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 03:29 PM
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I do love the christmas songs, too. This is the only time of the year I really miss having a piano. *sigh*

As for shopping, call me a minimalist, I guess--it's not for me. But I do enjoy making things to give those who are dear to me--and enjoy receiving the same (or nothing at all is just as good, for me).

'Peace on Earth--good will to men.'

That's good for all of us.



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 03:59 PM
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I am not offended by Christmas trees. Frankly, they are -- or at least can be -- quite beautiful. I especially like it when people decorate outdoor pine trees with lights and ornaments. On a winter's night, this can be a beautiful sight when out for a late night walk on a snowy night.

As for being offended by Christmas trees because they are an overt religious symbol....I really don't mind. Whether Christian or pagan, Christmas trees can be quite attractive and in the middle of winter, the festive lights can be quite heartening and uplifting in a time when winter can cause emotions and feelings that are quite contrary. We have all heard of S.A.D. -- seasonal affective disorder -- a form of depression that can set in due to a lack of sunlight. Christmas trees certainly can help.

Whether pagan, Christian or a corporate holiday, Christmas can be quite nice and Christmas trees add that sense of magic that we all need at a very dark and depressive season.


What I do object to is the way millions of little Christmas trees are hewn for a few weeks of enjoyment. Artificial trees, though not my favorite, I would prefer real trees, are an adequate replacement. Certainly, an artificial tree would utilize even more wood but at least it is a one time purchase that is good for a number of years and, in the long run, would reduce the wood and trees used and "wasted". Artificial trees can also be fire proofed or made fire retardant and this would be another benefit.

I think that it is wasteful to the extreme to cut down live christmas trees....a tree that has grown in the ground for ten to fifteen years only to be hewn for a month or even weeks of enjoyment is mind boggling, wasteful and simply stupid. But this is no justification to hate christmas trees.

One last note on the religioius aspect. I used to live in an Islamic area of Detroit, Dearborn actually. Every morning and at sundown, Islamic prayers would be broadcast from the parapet at a local mosque. Some would complain but it didn't bother me as it would only last a few minutes. If other religions had outword acts and displays, unless it really infringed upon my rights and sensibilities, I don't see why it should be of any concern of mine.



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by Mirthful Me

Originally posted by jupiter869
Yet there are those who claim to be offended by what Christmas Trees symbolize. I'm curious if those people are truly, deeply offended or are they just trying to make a point about Christianity dominating everything this time of year.


What's so "Christian" about a Christmas tree? I see a corporate symbol, and I see a pagan symbol, [...]


I'm Christian. I'm offended by x-mass trees. "Christ"-mass trees are pagan:

Jeremiah 10

1 Hear what the LORD says to you, O house of Israel. 2 This is what the LORD says:
"Do not learn the ways of the nations
or be terrified by signs in the sky,
though the nations are terrified by them.
3 For the customs of the peoples are worthless;

they cut a tree out of the forest,
and a craftsman shapes it with his chisel.
4 They adorn it with silver and gold;
they fasten it with hammer and nails
so it will not totter.

[to repeat:]

they cut a tree out of the forest,
and a craftsman shapes it with his chisel.
4 They adorn it with silver and gold;
they fasten it with hammer and nails
so it will not totter.

journals.aol.com...



posted on Dec, 4 2005 @ 07:14 PM
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Christmas, Pagan turn of the year, Jule, I celebrate it, I love it, not all the "gimme gifts" part
I will NOT take part in that. Let the Christians think the tree is christian and fool themselves about the birth of Our Lord, if it makes them happy. A little merryment in these dark times is wise, to say farewell to the past and welcome the future is perhaps a good thing.
As far as I know they would eat and drink them selves senseless for three days, a grand custom.
Merry Christmas
WIS



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by seawater999
[to repeat:]

they cut a tree out of the forest,
and a craftsman shapes it with his chisel.
4 They adorn it with silver and gold;
they fasten it with hammer and nails
so it will not totter.

journals.aol.com...



In fairness, this sounds more like a statue is being built. Craftsman, chisel, hammer and nails? "Shapes it with his chisel" = carving.



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 12:47 PM
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Is There Anyone Out There Who's REALLY Offended by Christmas Trees?


Only when one flashed its balls at me once...

badumpbump

But seriously. As a Christian I don't see the importance of the Christmas tree, or that the meaning of Christmas will be diminished any by what the tree is called. I realize that the symbolism of the cross (the tree) has been tied to it, but let's face it, that's not where it originated.

I'm going to celebrate Christmas (which will include a CHRISTMAS tree), and I'm not going to worry about what anybody else calls their holiday.
Live and let live, worship and let nonworship...that's my motto. Actually it's not, but it just seemed to fit.

[edit on 12-5-2005 by Valhall]



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 12:55 PM
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I tell you what I find really offensive - that's those plasicky trees with the lights all built in and pre-programmed to chase each other around the branches, or do the can-can, or spell out in large letters MERRY XMAS


The only thing worse than that is bedecking your property with so much Christmas chintz that you bring down the local power grid.

How these people can show their faces in church is beyond me...

...eh? ... whaddyamean not everyone goes to chuch at Christmas?

I don't belieeeve it!!!



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 12:55 PM
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I also don't see trees as any more a part of Christmas than Santa Claus. There are two holidays at work being the Winter-holiday and consumerism and then the religious holiday. No one is worshipping in front of trees with Hallmark ornaments or guadier nonsense. We have one tree, tastefully decorated with white lights and glass orbs and an angel on the top, mostly to reflect upon when relaxing near the tree. Yeah, there was a pagan holiday years ago regarding planetary trajections. Now the pagan part is the secular consumerism.

Are left-handed shadow worshippers offended by pumpkins and Casper the Friendly Ghost? There's an outright pagan holiday.



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by Trinityman
I tell you what I find really offensive - that's those plasicky trees with the lights all built in and pre-programmed to chase each other around the branches, or do the can-can, or spell out in large letters MERRY XMAS


The only thing worse than that is bedecking your property with so much Christmas chintz that you bring down the local power grid.

How these people can show their faces in church is beyond me...

...eh? ... whaddyamean not everyone goes to chuch at Christmas?

I don't belieeeve it!!!


At least we got past the aluminum ones with the accompanying tri-colored rotating light thingy that made the tree go from red to green to blue. I actually had to suffer through several Christmas's of my childhood with one of those gawdy things.

Now you know what's wrong with me. And why I refuse to work with aluminum foil. I have flashbacks



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 01:02 PM
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Christmas trees are fine, it's all those Menorahs and Hanukkias that really upset me! Don't they know that Jesus is the reason for the season? Hey, it's first come, first served. The Christians have the end of the year, can't everybody else just bump-up their holidays to the beginning? Say, January?



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 01:09 PM
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Originally posted by Valhall
At least we got past the aluminum ones with the accompanying tri-colored rotating light thingy that made the tree go from red to green to blue. I actually had to suffer through several Christmas's of my childhood with one of those gawdy things.


Oh maaan. You're making me turn green (and red, and blue).

Actually when I was a kid we had a really nasty tree that resembled a complex network of green pipecleaners. It got so bent out of shape that even Santa would struggle to recognize it.

I guess that's why we never got any presents...



posted on Dec, 5 2005 @ 01:15 PM
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The only decoration on the outside of Strangecraft Castle is a wreath on the door.

Inside, we have a nice big tree, a roaring fire in the fireplace, and an advent wreath in the center of the room. We worship each evening, and sing religious carols, tell the Advent story, read Isaiah, etc.

St. Nikolas is coming tonight, to put stuff in the kiddoes' shoes. A lot less materialistic, when all the kid gets is stuff that will fit in a shoe (new pocketknife, a locket, etc.).

There's mistletoe hanging over the door to the master bedroom . . . .

The santa clause thing is a footnote in our religious celebration--we'll be in church on Christmas morn'.

Time for another cup o' nog.



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