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Was Shutting Down a Huge Mistake

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posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: Mandroid7
The real answer is NO, it wasn't a mistake.
It was 100% planned.

But yes, the psychological and financial effects are much worse than the flu virus.



You bring up something I left out that is very important. The psychological impact of this on people who don't know what their future will be and on those who lost the product of their lives work. Add that to the extreme paranoia it set off in many people, and the damage is terrible.




posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:24 PM
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TB is treated easily with antibitics we had 515 deaths in the usa in 2017 compared to 169,000 deaths in the usa from covid......we are not quite sure of the actual figures,but, come on it is a lot more than 515 so tell me were tb patients crowding all the hospitals???

oh and if you did your homework you would have seen THIS TB isn't easy to catch. You usually have to spend a long time around someone who has a lot of the bacteria in their lungs. You're most likely to catch it from co-workers, friends, and family members. Tuberculosis germs don't thrive on surfaces.Jun 27, 2020

so please do some research before posting...thank you



originally posted by: GBP/JPY
Yeah....we didn't shut down in 2017 when 1 point 6 million died of the dreaded TB....nary I saw and add a nada......nil.....a mask drawn from its quick access..........like I did in Alaska last week.....yep got a 28 foot rv.....high centered almost in Homer.......drove the hunting road both ways against policy but....yeah.....Denali Highway is not near Denali .....it's
The hunting road.....140 miles ....6 hours......one way.....smoke was 80 a quarter.... yep It's the hunting road called THE DENALI HIGHWAY......rentals forbidden but the tour bus goes so I did too.....I promise the exhaust had no hanger in the middle let the muffler drag a little......

edit on 16-8-2020 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)

edit on Sun Aug 16 2020 by DontTreadOnMe because: attempt to fix BB CODE



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

With what we knew at first, no it was common sense. But then State Governments went all "liability shy" extending the lockdowns. Lots of initial lockdowns were done with no real understanding of what "should" have been deemed essential or non-essential making everything 10 times worse. Companies couldn't roll out the PPE fast enough an even essential businesses were crashing an burning.

I've noticed that altho people were constantly talking about stocks nose-diving, or property value bubbles exploding for the most part no one was prepared for the ramifications of the lockdowns. Despite all the alleged preparedness of local gov't's it was an absolute free-for-all.

Still I think it was necessary in the short term, but now it's just crippling.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:26 PM
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Yes shutting down or closing the businesses closing the travel domestically was a big mistake what should have been done is isolate those with the virus immediately instead of letting them roam around with the 14-day voluntarily condition where they were to self isolate that does not work in the real world especially if you're dealing with mental cases



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

No, it wasn't a mistake. It's an experiment, a test, a drill. It didn't matter the cost, just the conclusions.

Some people knew about it or figured out sooner than the rest and took advantage of the situation.

The real move is yet to come, the next stage of the plan.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:29 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: DBCowboy



It is possible with just a modicum of self-control to discuss things rationally. You most certainly have that ability.


I warned people in March.

Few listened.

*shakes head*



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:32 PM
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Covid-19, is interesting and very scary to watch, it’s effects to the entire world, it’s horrifying, because we can see it’s potential of what it can do before it does it. It’s sad. I am hoping we get thru this better...



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: DBCowboy



It is possible with just a modicum of self-control to discuss things rationally. You most certainly have that ability.


I warned people in March.

Few listened.

*shakes head*


You know, I wake up every morning thinking what does DB think
Would he chose a blue shirt or a green one?

I think I'm like most people. My views have been all over the map as this has progressed.

I started out thinking we should just let it run its course, changed to agreeing with the shutdowns and precautions, and now I'm back to thinking what my first instinct was; shutting down was wrong.

Emotion has been driving decisions when it's likely best those decisions should have been driven by logic. Fear of death has been the engine driving this, and in typical human fashion fear leads to bad decisions.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:41 PM
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Shutting down was a huge mistake.

There are no peer reviewed studies that show it does any good.

In fact it seems lock downs cause more people to get sick.


Many policies provide public-health benefits in pandemics, such as making facemasks mandatory, cancelling school, and banning large assemblies and long-distance travel. But ordering people to cower in their homes, harassing people for having playdates in the park, and ordering small businesses to close regardless of their hygienic procedures has no demonstrated effectiveness.

That simple sentence is enough to ignite a firestorm of controversy these days, whether you say it in public (to someone at least six feet away, of course) or online. As soon as the words leave your lips, they begin to be interpreted in extraordinary ways. Why do you want to kill old people? Why do you think the economy is more important than saving lives? Why do you hate science? Are you a shill for Trump? Why are you spreading misinformation about the severity of COVID?

But here’s the thing: there’s no evidence of lockdowns working. If strict lockdowns actually saved lives, I would be all for them, even if they had large economic costs. But, put simply, the scientific and medical case for strict lockdowns is paper-thin.
Lockdowns Don’t Work


edit on 16-8-2020 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Yes indeed, emotionally based decisions. The catalyst in the states. Is the current events presently and at the end of the year.
edit on 16-8-2020 by Bicent because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:43 PM
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I don’t think it was a huge mistake at first, it was to flatten the curve in which we don’t hear about that anymore. It is a huge mistake as of right now to keep it shut down. It’s time to Open sesame.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:44 PM
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In hindsight it was definitely a mistake.
Larger cities where the population is dense would probably benefit from social distancing and working from home as much as possible but for everyone else it was a waste.

I still hold china responsible.
Not so much for where the virus came from but for all the delays and coverups they instituted.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:46 PM
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originally posted by: Bicent
a reply to: Blaine91555

Yes indeed, emotionally based decisions. The catalyst in the states. The presidential election this year.


I'm going to ask one more time that politics be completely absent from this discussion.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

I was at ground zero, Hoss.

I saw what was happening and tried to calm people down.

Not too many listened.

I went through having a household quarantined for two weeks, I work in Covid hospitals with Covid patients. I deal with vents and Covid patients now.

There's not a lot I might have missed.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
I purposefully chose South Dakota to compare with Anchorage to look at it without factoring that in. The statewide numbers in Alaska are very similar to those of just Anchorage. I wanted it to be more apple to apple.


Without doing any digging of my own, are there any counties or equivalents to Anchorage or SD in terms of population and density? I'm sure you could parse through previous US census data, but I wouldn't even know where to begin to look. May find something more similar, is all.

a reply to: Mandroid7

These are pretty close to my thoughts.

As soon as things started leaking of the lockdowns in China I knew a terrible precedent of just what those in power could get away with. Thankfully, it hasn't gotten that bad in the USA yet, but it's still 50/50 on which way they're going to go.

This may not have been entirely planned, but they kept testing the waters to see what they could get away with in terms of lockdowns.

a reply to: research100

I don't know what you did with the formatting, but your post sure is wonky! (Sorry for off-topic.)

a reply to: DBCowboy

You sound just like my wife. (That's a compliment, if I've ever given one!)
edit on 8/16/2020 by cmdrkeenkid because: Fixing typo.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Isn't part of the real problem that large cities never did have adequate facilities to begin with? Seems like even after the SAR's scare, hospitals failed to be prepared by choice.

That's not directed at you, I know what you do. I'm talking about a systemic failure by our medical system to be prepared.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: DBCowboy

Isn't part of the real problem that large cities never did have adequate facilities to begin with? Seems like even after the SAR's scare, hospitals failed to be prepared by choice.

That's not directed at you, I know what you do. I'm talking about a systemic failure by our medical system to be prepared.


It's not that easy.

The capital expense to be "prepared" would break any budget.

It's like preparing for a meteor strike.

You just can't do it.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid

I suppose a person could look at other comparisons, but that was not really my intent.

One thing I found interesting a couple of weeks back was in comparing the average mortality rate in Alaska to the mortality rate now, and found that deaths were actually down for the state.

Large cities are difficult in that they don't seem to have the capabilities per capita that smaller more rural cities have. I came into this thinking the opposite, but it seems to be the case. It would be interesting to look into that.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Well, I doubt it's saved any money overall. Being prepared is always cheaper than dealing with emergencies as they happen. As it is, the prices went sky-high, when it could have been prepped for far cheaper in advance. A regular oil change is far cheaper than replacing an engine. Walking over dollars to pick up dimes comes to mind.



posted on Aug, 16 2020 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

True, but you don't buy a spare car engine just to have in case you throw a rod.




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