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Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils

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posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 05:23 AM
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When I first read the title I did not know what to think .... But the article does make sense when you consider how animals take in food and expel waste matter.. If you're going to find food you need sense organs of some type which finally led to eyes for some a feelers for others among our 5 senses. Either way like the old saying goes after considerable rework into the P.C. culture "everyone has an opinion just like they have an anus although in many cases the anus holds more value ."

555 million-year-old mud crawler...who would have thought the basic plan would end up where we are today ?


A team led by UC Riverside geologists has discovered the first ancestor on the family tree that contains most familiar animals today, including humans.

The tiny, wormlike creature, named Ikaria wariootia, is the earliest bilaterian, or organism with a front and back, two symmetrical sides, and openings at either end connected by a gut. The paper is published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The earliest multicellular organisms, such as sponges and algal mats, had variable shapes. Collectively known as the Ediacaran Biota, this group contains the oldest fossils of complex, multicellular organisms. However, most of these are not directly related to animals around today, including lily pad-shaped creatures known as Dickinsonia that lack basic features of most animals, such as a mouth or gut.

The development of bilateral symmetry was a critical step in the evolution of animal life, giving organisms the ability to move purposefully and a common, yet successful way to organize their bodies. A multitude of animals, from worms to insects to dinosaurs to humans, are organized around this same basic bilaterian body plan.

phys.org...
edit on 727thk20 by 727Sky because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 05:32 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Wow. Wonder how many generations back that is.

Cheers



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 05:38 AM
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originally posted by: F2d5thCavv2
a reply to: 727Sky

Wow. Wonder how many generations back that is.

Cheers


Not far by Australian standards. Hang on...wait...what did I just say.

Bally



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 05:53 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Isn't the ancestor to all animals... fungi?





According to mycologist Paul Stamets (and science) it definitely is.




posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 06:10 AM
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originally posted by: karl 12
a reply to: 727Sky

Isn't the ancestor to all animals... fungi?





According to mycologist Paul Stamets (and science) it definitely is.



They are referring to a body plan, not the first life to exist..



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 06:18 AM
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We've come along way huh?
I wonder what we will look like after the same amount of generations again.
If we make it that far,I bet we will look very different to what we do now.



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 07:48 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

There is no evidence this evolved into people or animals. I know the link says so but there is no proof in the link it evolved into anything just some scientists thought it existed and now they think they found it.



posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Why couldn't we have devolved from superior species?




posted on Mar, 25 2020 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Very interesting and if true lends credence to the out of Australia theory.

This is truly an amazing, ancient land.



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