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Inventor Of Navy's "UFO-Tech" Patents May Be A Quack

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posted on Jan, 22 2020 @ 11:48 PM
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Remember this story that got some attention a while back?

From an article published by The Drive last June:

The United States Secretary of Navy is listed as the assignee on several radical aviation technologies patented by an aerospace engineer working at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) headquarters in Patuxent River, Maryland.



Pais (Salvatore Cezar Pais) is named as the inventor on four separate patents for which the U.S. Navy is the assignee: a curiously-shaped “High Frequency Gravitational Wave Generator;” a room temperature superconductor; an electromagnetic ‘force field’ generator that could deflect asteroids; and, perhaps the strangest of all, one titled “Craft Using An Inertial Mass Reduction Device.”



While attempting to dig up as much information as possible about the inventor and these patents, I came across some supplemental documents in the USPTO’s databases that seem to imply that Navy leadership knows that these technologies are actually feasible – or that they want us or someone else to think that they are.

www.thedrive.com...



A follow up article that came out yesterday in The Drive, seems to imply that Dr. Pais' patents are dubious. The article also asks several questions concerning these patents that hit the mark:
Are they part of a misinformation campaign designed to lead America’s adversaries on a fruitless wild goose chase?
...could they be just the flimsy product of a persuasive and imaginative inventor and his gullible Navy bosses?


The Drive came across evidence, as well as experts, that indicates that the patents of Dr. Salvatore Pais "may represent something misleading, misguided, or misappropriated."


...the scientists and physicists we have talked to on and off the record have made it clear that they find the claims largely absurd and not grounded in scientific fact.

It seems particularly notable that Pais' patents, which according to top Navy officials were of major national security interest, were filed publicly, though the reason why remains elusive.

Despite Dr. Pais’ insistence that the Pais Effect is indeed a real phenomenon and the assurance that NAVAIR’s Chief Technology Officer gave the USPTO, we have been unable to find a single scientist or engineer who can corroborate the claims made in Dr. Pais’s patents.

According to Willis (Carl Willis, a nuclear engineer and reactor supervisor at the University of New Mexico), Dr. Pais' most recent work represents "a classic case of pathological science." Willis says the literature for the plasma compression fusion device contains invented jargon, nonsensical statements, weak or absent evidence of an informed theoretical basis, an "overabundance of nebulous adjectives and adverbs instead of meaningful quantities in technical writing," and "lots of statements made in passing that seem to contradict basic and accepted physics."

Willis says..."It's hard not to suspect he's either drinking the kool-aid himself, or just chumming the waters for the kind of people who do."

...we spoke with Dr. Charles Collett, an assistant professor of Physics at Muhlenberg College who specializes in experimental low-temperature research on the quantum state of molecular magnets. Like most physicists we've spoken to about the Pais patents, Collett remains skeptical. Collett concluded by adding that "the claims of macroscopic quantum coherence seem dubious," and that he "cannot see how that interaction could lead to any of the claimed effects."

...we continue to find scientists who suggest that the intended audience of these patents may not, in fact, be the scientific or aerospace communities as these patents and their supporting publications contain what most would call pseudoscience and empty jargon.

www.thedrive.com...



the intended audience of these patents may not, in fact, be the scientific or aerospace communities


So who is the intended audience? After all, like the article mentioned, "It’s also worth noting the well-established trend of the U.S. military making use of the Invention Secrecy Act of 1951 to file patents unavailable for public viewing, under which the Navy has been the most prolific filer since 2017." So, why would the Navy publicly release these patents?

Was it an attempt to spread disinformation concerning the Tic Tac ufo sighting?

Was it an attempt to trick China or Russia into believing we were on the brink of developing an ultra advanced technology? This YouTuber apparently bought into that idea:

IMO, I don't think China or Russia are foolish enough to believe the validity of these patents. Their scientists and physicists would question the claims, just like American experts did. So, was the U.S. Navy conned into believing Dr. Pais' claims, or was there an ulterior motive for them to make these radical patents public?

edit on 1/22/2020 by shawmanfromny because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 12:39 AM
link   

originally posted by: shawmanfromny
Remember this story that got some attention a while back?

From an article published by The Drive last June:

The United States Secretary of Navy is listed as the assignee on several radical aviation technologies patented by an aerospace engineer working at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division (NAWCAD) headquarters in Patuxent River, Maryland.



Pais (Salvatore Cezar Pais) is named as the inventor on four separate patents for which the U.S. Navy is the assignee: a curiously-shaped “High Frequency Gravitational Wave Generator;” a room temperature superconductor; an electromagnetic ‘force field’ generator that could deflect asteroids; and, perhaps the strangest of all, one titled “Craft Using An Inertial Mass Reduction Device.”



While attempting to dig up as much information as possible about the inventor and these patents, I came across some supplemental documents in the USPTO’s databases that seem to imply that Navy leadership knows that these technologies are actually feasible – or that they want us or someone else to think that they are.

www.thedrive.com...



A follow up article that came out yesterday in The Drive, seems to imply that Dr. Pais' patents are dubious. The article also asks several questions concerning these patents that hit the mark:
Are they part of a misinformation campaign designed to lead America’s adversaries on a fruitless wild goose chase?
...could they be just the flimsy product of a persuasive and imaginative inventor and his gullible Navy bosses?


The Drive came across evidence, as well as experts, that indicates that the patents of Dr. Salvatore Pais "may represent something misleading, misguided, or misappropriated."


...the scientists and physicists we have talked to on and off the record have made it clear that they find the claims largely absurd and not grounded in scientific fact.

It seems particularly notable that Pais' patents, which according to top Navy officials were of major national security interest, were filed publicly, though the reason why remains elusive.

Despite Dr. Pais’ insistence that the Pais Effect is indeed a real phenomenon and the assurance that NAVAIR’s Chief Technology Officer gave the USPTO, we have been unable to find a single scientist or engineer who can corroborate the claims made in Dr. Pais’s patents.

According to Willis (Carl Willis, a nuclear engineer and reactor supervisor at the University of New Mexico), Dr. Pais' most recent work represents "a classic case of pathological science." Willis says the literature for the plasma compression fusion device contains invented jargon, nonsensical statements, weak or absent evidence of an informed theoretical basis, an "overabundance of nebulous adjectives and adverbs instead of meaningful quantities in technical writing," and "lots of statements made in passing that seem to contradict basic and accepted physics."

Willis says..."It's hard not to suspect he's either drinking the kool-aid himself, or just chumming the waters for the kind of people who do."

...we spoke with Dr. Charles Collett, an assistant professor of Physics at Muhlenberg College who specializes in experimental low-temperature research on the quantum state of molecular magnets. Like most physicists we've spoken to about the Pais patents, Collett remains skeptical. Collett concluded by adding that "the claims of macroscopic quantum coherence seem dubious," and that he "cannot see how that interaction could lead to any of the claimed effects."

...we continue to find scientists who suggest that the intended audience of these patents may not, in fact, be the scientific or aerospace communities as these patents and their supporting publications contain what most would call pseudoscience and empty jargon.

www.thedrive.com...



the intended audience of these patents may not, in fact, be the scientific or aerospace communities


So who is the intended audience? After all, like the article mentioned, "It’s also worth noting the well-established trend of the U.S. military making use of the Invention Secrecy Act of 1951 to file patents unavailable for public viewing, under which the Navy has been the most prolific filer since 2017." So, why would the Navy publicly release these patents?

Was it an attempt to spread disinformation concerning the Tic Tac ufo sighting?

Was it an attempt to trick China or Russia into believing we were on the brink of developing an ultra advanced technology? This YouTuber apparently bought into that idea:

IMO, I don't think China or Russia are foolish enough to believe the validity of these patents. Their scientists and physicists would question the claims, just like American experts did. So, was the U.S. Navy conned into believing Dr. Pais' claims, or was there an ulterior motive for them to make these radical patents public?


Great stuff!

I'm going to follow/read the included links now.

I'm off like a prom dress...

: poof :



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 02:45 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

it's this ludicrous persistent desperate idea that Tic-Tac UFO are something of our own design, but secret. It's preposterous and frankly...pitiful. And obviously this...



It seems particularly notable that Pais' patents, which according to top Navy officials were of major national security interest, were filed publicly, though the reason why remains elusive.


Major fail.




posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 04:02 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

I honestly never put much stock into the story in the first place.

It's not hard to obtain a patent, you basically only have to apply for it and provide proof of concept, nothing more.

Technology like this would never make it to the patent office. It would be locked away from all eyes other than those that need to know (aka the people working on it).



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: shawmanfromny

I honestly never put much stock into the story in the first place.

It's not hard to obtain a patent, you basically only have to apply for it and provide proof of concept, nothing more.

Technology like this would never make it to the patent office. It would be locked away from all eyes other than those that need to know (aka the people working on it).


True, but I don't believe just anyone can file a patent using the US Navy as the assignee. That's the real mystery. Probably just disinfo



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 09:12 AM
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I doubt anyone in either chinese or russian intelligence would be fooled by such silly tricks.

But one other aspect to consider is that other peer states may have similar or better technologies already. Not all cutting edge research is US. Another thing is that there seems to be an awful lot of cooperation going on regardless of the political climate on the surface.

Maybe this is more targeted towards the US public? We may spend billions of dollars, but look what we are about to do? Eh? Classified, you know, but this is exciting.... Yes?

Maybe the US, China, Russia and others all have pretty advanced capabilities, and it doesn't really matter if they give some vague details away.

Remember also that a lot of jockeying for position is happening with regards to the upcoming Space Force...
Maybe the Navy felt the need to step it up a notch...

Edit: Just felt the urge to add that this is really part of a pattern, which The War Zone have written extensively about preciously. LEO tankers, travel to other galaxies and other outrageous statements made by USAF brass on the public stage. All of it equally puzzling.
edit on 23-1-2020 by beetee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 10:30 AM
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If it's BS then obviously nor China or Russia would fall for it. If US scientists call it a fairytale then so would the adversaries.
Timing seems to be weird. Just in line with the TTSA's started opennes on the fringe science and so on



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: Tekner

And also to get higher ups in the Navy to confirm your patents are legit and sign off on them. Something is up here, and it aint just a "quack scientist" who is making up a bunch of silly patents. The DoD is not known for playing games like this. Where there is smoke, there is fire...



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny

"Was it an attempt to spread disinformation concerning the Tic Tac ufo sighting?"

Yes, it was to cover the leak that was not supposed to happen.



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: shawmanfromny


Despite Dr. Pais’ insistence that the Pais Effect is indeed a real phenomenon and the assurance that NAVAIR’s Chief Technology Officer gave the USPTO, we have been unable to find a single scientist or engineer who can corroborate the claims made in Dr. Pais’s patents.

Sounds like another John Hutchinson , or perhaps John changed his name.




So who is the intended audience?

Bigelow probably , he likes funding for crazy ideas.
edit on 23-1-2020 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 11:54 AM
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Maybe generating belief is not aimed at other superpowers whose own scientists will come to the same conclusions about weaknesses in the Pais patents but, rather, aimed at the American public?

Maybe we're the suckers they are fishing for.



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: The GUT
Maybe generating belief is not aimed at other superpowers whose own scientists will come to the same conclusions about weaknesses in the Pais patents but, rather, aimed at the American public?

Maybe we're the suckers they are fishing for.


Yes, that was my instinctive response, too.

As I have said before, this whole circus (particularly the 'To The Stars' outfit whose very name blatantly invokes L. R. Hubbard's 1954 pulp novel) seems very 'Mericun-focused - seeming particularly obvious when viewed from this side of the pond where ufology has been dead in the water for decades. Sadly.




posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 03:45 PM
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These are for disinfo purposes to the american people. Remember its 70 percent BS,and 30 percent truth.



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: yuppa
These are for disinfo purposes to the american people.

Well, at least the few dozen to a couple hundred "American people" who are interested in this sort of stuff to bother even looking up the guy and his patents. UFO kooks, primarily. Nobody else really gives it a whole lot of thought, so whatever money the Navy spent on cooking this stuff up was pretty much wasted. The general public doesn't really care.



posted on Jan, 23 2020 @ 07:06 PM
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It would seem filing patents whilst working for the Pentagon is quite a thing.

patents.google.com...



Two guys, some cargo ships and one audacious idea



By Gus Sentementes Nov 16, 2009



Luis Elizondo and John Robert haven't worked in the cargo shipping industry before, but they've studied it feverishly for the past four years. And they think they've come up with a game-changing idea....

Their vision is a port that cuts down dramatically on wait times for ships to unload their cargo, and is turning around crew quickly and putting ships out to sail in a matter of hours, not days.

This year, Elizondo got a patent for the idea, and he and Robert formed a company called Never Ship Empty. They're about to start pitching it to leaders in the industry. And they're embarking on a feasibility study with the University of Houston to test out how efficient the new process could be for a port.

They'll have to persuade a lot of skeptics.

Baltimore Sun - Nov 2009



I guess when you are in charge of a Pentagon UFO Program at a high level you must have a lot of time on your hands huh?


edit on 23/1/2020 by mirageman because: ...



posted on Jan, 24 2020 @ 05:00 AM
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I'm new to the UFO & conspiracy field, I came across this video before in my YT search, claiming the moon landing was a hoax & I'm thinking UFOs are just simply military aircraft? youtu.be... What are your thoughts on the chances of UFOs being from an area outside of earth? Do you have any good links, you could share in regards to UFOs?



posted on Jan, 24 2020 @ 05:36 AM
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originally posted by: The GUT
Maybe generating belief is not aimed at other superpowers whose own scientists will come to the same conclusions about weaknesses in the Pais patents but, rather, aimed at the American public?

Maybe we're the suckers they are fishing for.


The average person is going to defer to the average scientist in discerning whether the patents are worth their attention.
I'd estimate 97% of Physicists, responding either online or to journalistic query, stated the Physics didn't correspond to any known model......all within a matter of days from the Patents being published.


If it wasn't to dupe science, the public or adversaries- but instead to study responses- well why didn't they just insert a number of technological edge lorded, similar sounding "tales" of Navy inertia drives into various conspiracy forums and see how the various "contactees to the narrative" responded over time?

Hmmmm.

At some point Sheehy is going to have to provide further explanation of his operability statement and unless Pais suddenly suddenly starts publishing his theoretical working "On the heuristic comprehension and altering of a macro quantum reality" - this will be the next indicator.


edit on 24-1-2020 by Jukiodone because: (no reason given)



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