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The Faster Than Light Issue

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posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope


You are using two different masses, or their equivalences and compare them.

Mass is mass. Rest mass is simply the mass observed in the same time frame as the mass being observed. In our time frame, where we observe the velocity of a photon as c, we also observe the effective mass of the photon as in the equations I posted.

Remember, there is no such thing as v=0. There is only v=0 in a particular time frame. All velocity is relative.


One: photons have no rest mass.

That is the commonly accepted explanation, but it flies in the face of E=mc^2. According to Einstein, mass and energy are interchangeable.


Two: you did not calculate the mass but the impulse of a photon.

I gave two equations that both use energy (E) as a term. One is for the energy of a photon, the other is the equation for energy/mass equivalency.

The point is that these two equations taken together imply something that does not exist. Therefore, the equations are incomplete just as Newton's equations were incomplete. Incomplete does not mean the same as "wrong," simply that there may be considerations not considered as yet in our understanding.

TheRedneck




posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: sapien82


If something had infinite mass wouldnt that make it have a really strong gravitational effect like a black hole



That would be the expected result... I'm glad it is not the actual result.


is it because of this "infinite mass" that light is actually affected by gravity , in the sense of gravitational lensing

Gravitational lensing is due to the 3D gravitational 'current' surrounding mass; a photon does not actually have mass, although it does have energy. The mathematics to determine the effect are identical to those traditionally employed to explain gravitational lensing because it is the same model viewed from different perspectives.

That's what I have alluded to above. E=mc^2 is incomplete.

This is something I have been working on for about 20 years now... a little much to explain in a post (or even a thread) but perhaps some day I will be able to publish it in book form.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 07:32 PM
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originally posted by: JonathanNicholas
a reply to: Harte

So traveling within an inertial frame means traveling locally as opposed to, say an entire galaxy traveling faster then light due to the universe itself ( the fabric of space) expanding?


You leave your inertial frame when you accelerate. Even if only in a car.
Obviously it's not much of a change when it's in a car.

Harte



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: JonathanNicholas

so does this mean that photons have infinite energy ?
if they can travel at the speed of light as they have no mass , then surely we could harness the infinite energy of light ?

E=mc^2
Now, put in zero for m.


originally posted by: sapien82Also I'm thinking since our awareness doesn't have mass it would explain how you can travel anywhere in the universe and anywhere in time with your awareness as shown by CRV almost instantaneously

I'm thinking your argument doesn't have mass.

Harte



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 07:44 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: sapien82

That's a flaw in the model.

Photons travel at velocity c. Photons have energy, given by λ = hcE, and therefore have a mass equivalence given by E = mc^2. At velocity c, that mass equivalence must be infinity. If the mass is infinity, it required infinite energy to achieve velocity c, which is impossible. In other words, according to present physics, light cannot exist.

The equations are not complete.

TheRedneck

The mass only increases because of the change from "rest" mass.
Photons have no rest mass. The mass equivalence you're talking about here is entirely in the energy the photon carries. Mass in the form of energy gained. And not gained through acceleration, by the way. Relativity doesn't increase a photon's energy.

Harte



posted on Sep, 18 2019 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Actually, since the energy of a photon is a function of the wavelength, and since the wavelength can and does change with relative motion, the energy of the photon is indeed affected by the apparent velocities.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 04:16 AM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: JonathanNicholas

so does this mean that photons have infinite energy ?
if they can travel at the speed of light as they have no mass , then surely we could harness the infinite energy of light ?

E=mc^2
Now, put in zero for m.


originally posted by: sapien82Also I'm thinking since our awareness doesn't have mass it would explain how you can travel anywhere in the universe and anywhere in time with your awareness as shown by CRV almost instantaneously

I'm thinking your argument doesn't have mass.

Harte


Yes my arguement is like the photon , its doesnt have mass but has lots of energy !



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 04:19 AM
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originally posted by: sapien82

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: sapien82
a reply to: JonathanNicholas

so does this mean that photons have infinite energy ?
if they can travel at the speed of light as they have no mass , then surely we could harness the infinite energy of light ?

E=mc^2
Now, put in zero for m.


originally posted by: sapien82Also I'm thinking since our awareness doesn't have mass it would explain how you can travel anywhere in the universe and anywhere in time with your awareness as shown by CRV almost instantaneously

I'm thinking your argument doesn't have mass.

Harte


Yes my arguement is like the photon , its doesnt have mass but has lots of energy ! like two world powers spending lots of money on it for over 20 years that kind of energy !

What would be the purpose in spending vast wealth and 20 years of dedicated research if it doesnt work . Why didnt they shelve it in the first year if its leeching money.

baering in mind this is a project that deals entirely in the conscious , so you arent really investing money into contracts like machine parts for the completion of a fighter jet, tank or sub

its just people sitting there , an easy project to abandon if it doesnt work as you arent losing anything.




posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 04:29 AM
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a reply to: sapien82


Yes my arguement is like the photon , its doesnt have mass but has lots of energy !

The thing is, E=mc^2 is not a one-way conversion. If E=mc^2, then it follows that m=E/c^2. If m=0, then E must equal zero as well, and we know that is not the case. If it were, there would be no such thing as solar energy; light would contain no energy.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: Peeple
No matter how romantic you are space travelling doesn't make sense with our current technology. Communication with Mars is delayed by 3-22 minutes, that's just for information at the speed of light and in our own backyard.
To meet other beings on other habitable planets we would have to go many many lightyears.
Currently the theoretical traveltime for 1 lightyear is a little less than 20.000 years.

The only plausible solution is to not travel at all but instead manipulate spacetime.
Human scientists came up with the idea of wormholes and (this is hilarious) it would take the energy our sun creates in 100 million years to produce one the size of a grapefruit.
This is exemplary of scientific stupidity, all the research done (CERN etc.) is basically just "you don't understand it - shoot it with as much force as you can muster". That's not research, or at least not very elegant.

So the key is to understand what spacetime is. There's already a formula circulating

The GOD equation, you can read more about it here.
The only problem I'm having with it is that behind it is the assumption everything is a particle, even if they call it "entity" it's still the wrong approach. Understandable sure, physics has problems imagining the non-physical.

My suggestion would be that someone starts to put together the GOD equation, with CMBR + Higg's Field - the particle fixation
The other thing is manipulation can be gentle,
pick the string to make it swing
That would take a lot less energy than shooting a hole in it.

And once you've cracked how to play the spacetime strings nothing is impossible, besides I'm sure it includes an eye-opener to what the 95% of the universe really are.


We're infants. Modern science is not even 100 years old. Therefore I would be careful with believing what is possible and what is not.



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck


Maybe the photons couldn't arrive before they are sent but if you could microscopically warp space time a significant amount you should achieve Faster than light communications.

If space time could be warped so that a photon that normally travels 186,000 miles per second could cover 372,000 miles per second. You could achieve a 50 percent increase in the distance a photon can cover in a second.

The photon doesn't break the speed of light barrier. It still travels the same speed it just cheats by having a device to bend spacetime so it doesn't have as far to travel.
edit on 19-9-2019 by BenjanonFranklin because: Misspelled word



posted on Sep, 19 2019 @ 12:09 PM
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originally posted by: BenjanonFranklin

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck


Maybe the photons couldn't arrive before they are sent but if you could microscopically warp space time a significant amount you should achieve Faster than light communications.

If space time could be warped so that a photon that normally travels 186,000 miles per second could cover 372,000 miles per second. You could achieve a 50 percent increase in the distance a photon can conver in a second.

The photon doesn't break the speed of light barrier. It still travels the same speed it just cheats by having a device to bend spacetime so it doesn't have as far to travel.


Photon propulsion can break the speed of light barrier, if it uses constant acceleration.



posted on Sep, 20 2019 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: BenjanonFranklin

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck


Maybe the photons couldn't arrive before they are sent but if you could microscopically warp space time a significant amount you should achieve Faster than light communications.

If space time could be warped so that a photon that normally travels 186,000 miles per second could cover 372,000 miles per second. You could achieve a 50 percent increase in the distance a photon can conver in a second.

The photon doesn't break the speed of light barrier. It still travels the same speed it just cheats by having a device to bend spacetime so it doesn't have as far to travel.


Photon propulsion can break the speed of light barrier, if it uses constant acceleration.

No, it can't. No propulsion-type drive can ever reach the speed of light.

Harte



posted on Sep, 20 2019 @ 08:06 PM
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As a technologically inferior species, we assume that E=MC2 and so on is the end-all, be-all to science and space travel. In reality that probably doesn't begin to scratch the surface of what is, and what is possible. Einstein called it spooky for a reason. Not even he could begin to fathom how it works. And in reality, quantum physics again, is probably Lego block complex when it comes to the reality of the science of space travel.

We can make vague guesses about the possibility of space travel that we would think would take millions of years, but that's all it would be - vague guesses. To species even thousands of years advanced it could seem much simpler. Tens of thousands? Hundreds? Millions of years of advancement over our speck of a world? Visiting Earth from another galaxy could be as simple as driving down the street for some tacos.



posted on Sep, 20 2019 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: BenjanonFranklin

But why warp space (assuming that is possible; we haven't actually done it yet) when all one need do to transmit data is to utilize an already-existing (albeit in its infancy) technology. Light velocity manipulation cannot be used to send objects, only data, so there is no upside to using light.

Entangled particles are already linked via wormholes through additional dimensions. If we can understand how that link works, it can be made as short as need be, resulting in practically simultaneous communication. No need to reinvent the wheel.

TheRedneck



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: BenjanonFranklin

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck


Maybe the photons couldn't arrive before they are sent but if you could microscopically warp space time a significant amount you should achieve Faster than light communications.

If space time could be warped so that a photon that normally travels 186,000 miles per second could cover 372,000 miles per second. You could achieve a 50 percent increase in the distance a photon can conver in a second.

The photon doesn't break the speed of light barrier. It still travels the same speed it just cheats by having a device to bend spacetime so it doesn't have as far to travel.


Photon propulsion can break the speed of light barrier, if it uses constant acceleration.

No, it can't. No propulsion-type drive can ever reach the speed of light.

Harte


If an object --- like a starship --- can mimic no rest mass, say...with the means of a magnetic shield surrounding it, should be able to break the speed of light barrier while under constant acceleration from a propulsion unit.
edit on 21-9-2019 by Erno86 because: added a few words



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: sapien82


Yes my arguement is like the photon , its doesnt have mass but has lots of energy !

The thing is, E=mc^2 is not a one-way conversion. If E=mc^2, then it follows that m=E/c^2. If m=0, then E must equal zero as well, and we know that is not the case. If it were, there would be no such thing as solar energy; light would contain no energy.

TheRedneck


You are failing to account for Momentum, where light derives all of it's energy.

E=MC^2

Is a special use equation derived from:

E^2 = P^2C^2 + M^2C^4 , Where P is momentum.

The total (E)nergy of a particle is a COMBINATION of it's Momentum Energy (P^2C^2) AND it's Mass Energy (M^2C^4)

This leads to two simple conclusions.

1) If light has Zero Mass, then it derives all of it's energy from it's momentum (P)
2) If a particle had no mass (M=0) AND no Momentum (P=0) aka at rest, it would not exist. Thus for light to exist it can never be at rest and all of it's energy is in it's Momentum.

Also relativity tells us if an object travels less than the speed of light, it can be seen as at rest with a different reference frame and it must have mass, thus all objects that exist and have no mass must travel the speed of light and in all reference frames.




edit on 21-9-2019 by Extorris because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Erno86

originally posted by: BenjanonFranklin

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: BenjanonFranklin


If a photon left a transmitter.....traveled through a microscopic wormhole that warped spaced. Couldn't it be possible that the photon could arrive at a receiver before it was actually sent?

I don't know about before it was sent, but quantum entanglement holds great promise for faster-than-light communications. One interesting aspect of quantum entanglement is that the entanglement is not instantaneous as once believed... entangled particles have been shown to have a delay between them, but that delay is still much faster than what could be expected using speed of light calculations, and is also not regular. Different pairs of entangled particles exhibit different delays. My theories actually predicted this.

The information above is from a physics journal I no longer have access to since leaving school. It was published ca. 2015.

TheRedneck


Maybe the photons couldn't arrive before they are sent but if you could microscopically warp space time a significant amount you should achieve Faster than light communications.

If space time could be warped so that a photon that normally travels 186,000 miles per second could cover 372,000 miles per second. You could achieve a 50 percent increase in the distance a photon can conver in a second.

The photon doesn't break the speed of light barrier. It still travels the same speed it just cheats by having a device to bend spacetime so it doesn't have as far to travel.


Photon propulsion can break the speed of light barrier, if it uses constant acceleration.

No, it can't. No propulsion-type drive can ever reach the speed of light.

Harte


If an object --- like a starship --- can mimic no rest mass, say...with the means of a magnetic shield surrounding it, should be able to break the speed of light barrier while under constant acceleration from a propulsion unit.


I have always thought that once we can fully get a handle on the Higgs boson particle and Higgs Field and figure out a way to exploit it we should be able to travel at a minimum the speed of light and maybe even faster.

The Higgs field is what is responsible for assigning mass or in the case of light, energy.

simple.wikipedia.org...



posted on Sep, 21 2019 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: Extorris

I am impressed.

However, you fail to mention that momentum is a function of mass multiplied by velocity. A particle with no mass also has no momentum (which light demonstrably does).

TheRedneck




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