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The Faster Than Light Issue

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posted on Oct, 15 2019 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Friction is quite dissimilar to inertia though. Friction converts kinetic energy into heat. Inertia does not. Friction is dissipative, inertia is conservative. Friction acts when matter moves against matter. Inertia acts when a force is applied to matter.

Inertia is not a force, it is a property. A property which resists acceleration. It is only experienced when an actual force is applied to mass.

edit on 10/15/2019 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 15 2019 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: Phage


Friction is quite dissimilar to inertia though. Friction converts kinetic energy into heat. Inertia does not. Friction is dissipative, inertia is conservative. Friction acts when matter moves against matter. Inertia acts when a force is applied to matter.

I didn't say they are the same thing, Phage. I simply said that inertia manifests itself as a resistance to velocity change similarly to how friction presents itself as a resistance to position change. In that respect, yes, inertia can be considered a repelling force, although there is not any real benefit mathematically from considering it such.


Inertia is not a force, it is a property. A property which resists acceleration. It is only experienced when an actual force is applied to mass.

Friction is a property as well.

Yet, it is modeled as a force.

Gravity is a property of matter.

Yet, it is modeled as a force.

Go figure.

TheRedneck



posted on Oct, 15 2019 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck



A good example is the traditional explanation of the gravitational well around a black hole being described as an indention in the space-time surrounding it - objects orbit because their centrifugal energy counters the force pulling them down into the indention.


"Down" in space? Sure, why not?

According to Orson Scott Card in his novel "Ender's Game" - the enemy's gate is *down*. And that was in zero G space too.

The movie wasn't half bad either - all things considered. I've seen many other sci-fi movie "hack jobs" that simply butchered the author's intent.


This one did not.



edit on 10/15/2019 by Riffrafter because: (no reason given)



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