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A new analysis of the Pascagoula abduction

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posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 05:58 AM
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The Pascagoula abduction of Calvin Parker and Charles Hickson is one of the best known abduction cases in the history of Ufology. One of the men, Calvin Parker, recently wrote a book after 45 years of mostly staying silent. The guy could of made a killing traveling with Hickson on the U.F.O. circuit but didn't want to say anything at first and retreated from the spotlight. He finally chose to tell his story 45 years later and it's as profound today as it was back then. Here's a video where Parker gives some detail as to what happened.



These guys were examined, polygraphed and they tried to trick them by recording their conversations unbeknownst to them.

Parker says some very interesting things. He says that the 3 creatures came out of the ship and these 3 creatures took them into the ship and into an examination room. He said these 3 creatures looked more mechanical. This is important because he notices mechanical movement vs. what he saw later.

He then says something came out of the ceiling and examined his head. After it examined his head, it went back up into the ceiling and another creature came into the examination room.

This is important, because while the others looked mechanical, this one looked biological. It looked like something he recognized because he said it was female. The female being talked to him telepathically and told him everything would be okay.

She also did some sort of examination around the throat area.

Again, these details are very important and here's what I surmise after studying this case over the years.

First, these beings were connected to us. This means they share are biology in some ways but they have obviously enhanced themselves genetically. This is why Parker saw familiarity when the female being entered the room. He didn't just recognize she was biological but possibly female.

Secondly, I asked, why were they doing what appeared to be a medical procedure on them? The answer is a simple one. These are post singularity humans.

Post singularity humans will be more advanced, genetically enhanced and connected to A.I. This means information for them has grown exponentially faster because of A.I. Once we have an A.I. that can reproduce more intelligent copies of itself and the same algorithms that can learn to play Atari can also teach themselves to spot cancer, then it's just a matter of time before we're in a post singularity world.

We can accelerate, in quick fashion, thousands of years ahead when it comes to science and technology. Just imagine, 10,000 years of understanding science and technology occurring in 10-20 years.

So, a post singularity human is still connected to our biology but just enhanced genetically. They could get a simple virus that spreads in their population and that's deadly but it's something buried in the data of pre singularity humans. You could run a bunch of simulations to try and figure it out but even then the cure could escape them. So the next best thing is to find a couple of pre singularity humans and get the data you need in order to cure this glitch.

I suspect post singularity humans don't get sick often but they live in a world that's maybe 10,000 or 100,000 years in accelerated data that pre singularity data can just get buried.

Here's a recent article about the sighting where you had eyewitnesses around the same time, who saw the ship around where Parker and Hickson saw it.


Others in town saw weird things around that same time.

Capt. Ryder said there were three sightings of an unexplained flash of light reported the night it happened, but he did not include those in the official police report.

Ryder said he later learned there had been sightings of unexplained lights all along the Coast in the nights before Hickson and Parker.

The Sun Herald found a retired professional from a local industry, who described in detail something she still can’t explain under the condition that she remain anonymous.

It was before Christmas 1973, about two months after Hickson and Parker.

She was standing outside her car at a gas station near Market Street and Ingalls Avenue in Pascagoula, when she and others saw a flaming object fly along the river.

“I was putting gas in my car and there were two or three others out of their cars. It was about 8 p.m., good and dark.

“For some reason, I was facing north and what I saw was on my left. We all looked … I don’t always remember things, but boy, I remember this.

“It started out up-river, at about the (U.S. 90) bridge and it came down to the beach, always over the river.”

She said it was just above the tree line and disappeared when it reached the beach. It lasted 3-4 seconds. But in that time, the object traveled more than a mile.

It flew over the spot where Hickson and Parker said they were abducted.

The image is so vivid that 45 years later, she can draw it — the shape of a hat with a stubby brim. It had flames all over it moving clockwise, not like a reentry trail. The object moved parallel to the river.

“We just looked at each other, put our eyes down and kept doing what we were doing,” she said. “We were all embarrassed for some reason.

“And to this day, I think why would we be embarrassed?” she said. “It was like somebody walked up and flashed you, and you’re like, ‘No, we didn’t see that.’”


www.sunherald.com...

Why would this woman lie?

Here's a video of Hynek talking about the case and an interview with Hickson from a Reporter.





Hynek says something very important. He says in order to get answers you have to gauge the credibility of the witnesses. This is what's lacking in this area especially from pseudoskeptics, They want to treat all eyewitness accounts as equally invalid because humans can have faulty memories. This is exactly why we weigh the credibility of the witness and Lawyers will not put a witness on the stand if he/she isn't credible.

This is also why we have expert witnesses because it can bolster the account of the evidence and the eyewitnesses if there are any. So this is a very strong case and I would say A, they experienced something unique and B, it was extraterrestrial visitation. I'm 100% convinced of A and about 95% convinced of B. There's no other explanation that makes sense outside of post singularity visitation.
edit on 12-8-2019 by neoholographic because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: neoholographic

Interesting story, but why do you think they're "post singularity humans"? How would that have happened? And how can you be at the same time 95% sure they were ET? Isn't that mutually exclusive?
Did you ever hear about Levengood?
The only alien blood samples we have and they're clearly not related to us.



posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 11:22 AM
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The notion that a lot of UFO humanoids are humans from the future has been around for a while, and except for knowing exactly what kind of mechanism would allow that it's not a bad theory. It goes a long way toward answering the questions as to how they generally look like us, can breathe our air, why they would be interested in us at all, and why they try to keep themselves secret. It may even provide them with a kind of motive, which would be to collect "clean" DNA samples from the ancestors of the people who manage to survive into the future, possibly for repair, possibly because they might use DNA to travel through spacetime in some way.

But abductions are problematic to begin with. They generally seem crude and clumsy. If they were only looking for general information about our genetics, they could go to a proper time and look on the Internet. Which I suppose suggests that they're only abducting very specific people with very specific DNA. Somebody should do a test for that, to see if abductees have some kind of DNA trait in common.

I do like the stories like this one and the Travis Walton abduction where the abductees talk about seeing different kinds of aliens interacting with each other. It's either more friendly, or more conspiratorial, depending how you look at it.
edit on 12-8-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Either that or Aliens with a similar biology. If you accept Einsteins block universe, then post singularity humans might figure out how to visit the past through wormholes or warping space-time.

Remember, post singularity humans will be living in a world of accelerated information because of the explosion of intelligence.

This is only 5-10 years away maybe less. All that's needed is an A.I. that can teach itself using different data sets and it can make more intelligent versions of itself every second or every minute.

With humans, it takes us 9 months plus 25-30 years before most kids become more intelligent than their Parents and in many cases it never happens.

Imagine an A.I. that can make a more intelligent version of itself every minute. That would be a new version, smarter version 525,600 minutes per year or over 31 million seconds per year every second.

It's easy to see why there will be an explosion of intelligence, unless we Nuke ourselves first.

People living today could be the ones visiting us in some of these U.F.O.'s as post singularity humans.



posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 03:10 PM
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Despite all their tech, all they can do is suggest not to be scared while actually scaring the crap out of you. I don't know...meh. Just seems like they could abduct someone and actually not scare them if they really wanted to do so.
Am I wrong for thinking this?



posted on Aug, 12 2019 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: Stupidsecrets
Despite all their tech, all they can do is suggest not to be scared while actually scaring the crap out of you. I don't know...meh. Just seems like they could abduct someone and actually not scare them if they really wanted to do so.
Am I wrong for thinking this?

I saw a short YouTube video about the abduction of a band of musicians in Canada that I thought was interesting. They went through the abduction but had a very nice, friendly interaction with the aliens, who convinced them that they were doing something extremely important. The musicians were actually sad for it to be over, and they were proud to have participated in it. They got a memory wipe, of course, and only started to remember the abduction later. But it certainly implied that fear was not the only way the aliens could manipulate somebody. Here it is, if you'd like to watch it:



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 03:26 AM
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originally posted by: Stupidsecrets
Am I wrong for thinking this?


Who knows but as with most contact cases it doesn't seem to make sense - more of a show to get across a theme - the question being the purpose driving it.



posted on Aug, 13 2019 @ 06:06 PM
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I dont get one thing: Why should "post singularity humans" visit us if they have access to all the information they need?
Sorry I couldnt watch the video yet, is the other abductee still alive as well?

Finally, a fellow writer mentioned "Levengood", so much splash and so little evidence. I dont get that.



posted on Aug, 14 2019 @ 11:09 AM
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originally posted by: eiieu
I dont get one thing: Why should "post singularity humans" visit us if they have access to all the information they need?

I was speculating that perhaps they're looking for something more specific and less general. Libraries and the Internet are good places to get general information, but if you want something personal from a specific individual, that wouldn't be there. Your own DNA, for instance, is not in some file on the Internet. So they actually have to do the legwork and come back and physically get you if they need your special DNA.

Or maybe they need information that will be destroyed at some time in the future, and the only way to get it is to come back before it was destroyed and retrieve it.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 12:03 AM
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originally posted by: neoholographic
www.sunherald.com...

Why would this woman lie?
Why would the people on the bridges lie when they said they didn't see it?


They were between the U.S. 90 bridge and the CSX railroad bridge when it happened. Both bridges had bridge tenders that did not corroborate the story.



Here's a video of Hynek talking about the case and an interview with Hickson from a Reporter.


Hynek says something very important. He says in order to get answers you have to gauge the credibility of the witnesses.
Yes, but Hynek also says this starting at about half a minute in:

"I was never able to substantiate (the story) in any manner I would call a scientific manner...
I was completely disbelieving the story, and I still disbelieve it, because it's my nature not to believe unless I have firm evidence."

In essence the younger man passed out and didn't really see any abduction event, so there's really only one witness to that, the then 42 year old Hickson. Joe Nickell offers the idea that maybe Hickson was telling the truth about what he experienced, so it wasn't a lie or a hoax, but he also raises the possibility that that doesn't mean the only other option is that it really happened. There's a third option which he suggests here (which is similar to the proposed cause for many contactee experiences in which people also are not lying but maybe the experience didn't really happen):

skepticalinquirer.org...



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:11 AM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

The Skeptical Inquirer? Joe Nickell's the professional pseudoskeptic?

First, let's talk about Profit motive.

There's every reason to believe Parker over anything pseudoskeptic Nickell's say. It's funny how you guys are always screaming that the person with the U.F.O. story just wants to make money in UFO entertainment but you never question the motives of these pseudoskeptics who make a good living off of people like you. Let's look at what Nickell's have done by being a pseudoskeptic.

Nickell is Senior Research Fellow for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI) and writes regularly for their journal, the Skeptical Inquirer. He is also an associate dean of the Center for Inquiry Institute. He is the author or editor of over 30 books.

en.wikipedia.org...

Over 30 books! He's also on every other TV program being the pseudoskeptic. It was usually him or Michael Shermer. Another Professional pseudoskeptic.

Who knows, this guy could believe most of these stories in private but he has one hell of an incentive to be Mr. Pseudoskeptic in public.

Nickell is Senior Research Fellow for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI) and writes regularly for their journal, the Skeptical Inquirer. He is also an associate dean of the Center for Inquiry Institute. He is the author or editor of over 30 books.

Why don't you guys ever question the motives of these Professional pseudoskeptics? He makes one hell of a living being a pseudoskeptic so he has an incentive to be skeptical about everything. He would probably be skeptical of where he was born if he could write a book about it. 30 BOOKS!

On the other hand, Parker stayed out of the limelight for 45 years and this is his first book about the incident. The young man did see the abduction event. He was the one that was very scared and talked about the event when they went to Police.

He's the one that didn't want to tell anyone because he didn't want to tell people he went into a spaceship. This is explained in the article:

Originally, Parker asked Hickson to keep it quiet. He said, “I felt this case was personal and no one needed to know.”

But Hickson was determined to talk about it. They agreed that they would tell the officials that Parker passed out and didn’t remember anything, leaving Hickson clear to tell the story without contradiction.

More recently, Parker said he let that lie stand because “I wasn’t sure what had happened or who it was, so I didn’t want to go back home and say to people … ‘I took a ride on a spaceship.’”

Besides, he said, “I was supposed to be married in November.”


www.sunherald.com...

This was an obvious lie because it was Parker who convinced authorities that they had an experience.

He was the one the sheriff’s deputies said was “climbing the walls” when left alone in an interrogation room to talk with Hickson.

It was Parker’s reaction that convinced law officers that something bad had happened. In the background, deputies could hear Parker begging Hickson, “Don’t talk to them Charlie, those people will come back and get us. They don’t want us to talk.”


Again, Parker has no motive to lie. Hickson passed a polygraph and Parker didn't seek to capitalize on this situation when Professional pseudoskeptic make a lot of money being skeptical about everything. They will probably question there name if they could make money off of it.

There were other eyewitnesses.

Others in town saw weird things around that same time.

Capt. Ryder said there were three sightings of an unexplained flash of light reported the night it happened, but he did not include those in the official police report.

He said the report was simple. He interviewed Hickson and Parker, checked out the site and found nothing.

Ryder said he later learned there had been sightings of unexplained lights all along the Coast in the nights before Hickson and Parker.


So the bridge tenders not seeing anything just means they didn't see anything. It has nothing to do with what Parker and Hickson experienced and the events that followed.

I believe the bridge tenders saw nothing but that's just their experience. I can believe all of the witnesses but the pseudoskeptic only wants to mention the bridge tenders as if they are 100% correct without question so everyone else must be lying. Typical pseudoskeptic nonsense.

Lastly, of course Hynek was a skeptic which makes Hynek such a powerful witness for the strength of Ufology. He couldn't deny what he was seeing and hearing.

Here's a great article on Hynek:

The Professional UFO Skeptic Who Believed in Aliens

'The Close Encounters Man' tells the unlikely story of how the government's astrophysicist debunker became the phenomenon's most expert defender.


www.vice.com...

Also, you just don't do your research like most pseudoskeptics, you jump to conclusions. Instead of listening to the audio, you heard Hynek say this:

"I was never able to substantiate (the story) in any manner I would call a scientific manner...
I was completely disbelieving the story, and I still disbelieve it, because it's my nature not to believe unless I have firm evidence."


Hynek wasn't talking about the Pascagoula case. He was talking about another case at Wright Patterson. The person that posted the video points this out in the description. If you would have bothered to actual research this event with an open mind, you wouldn't have made such an obvious faux pas!

Audio of the famous UFO incident in Pascagoula, Mississippi that J. Allen Hynek investigated and found two early abduction victims totally credible. The beginning of the audio has Dr. Hynek talking about an unrelated incident at Wright-Patterson AFB. Then the interview switches to the Pascagoula case

www.youtube.com...

When Hynek talked about the Pascagoula case, he said "THEY HAVE HAD AN EXPERIENCE, PERIOD!"

The same thing I said. He concluded they had an experience based on the evidence. When it comes to these cases you can determine the credibility of the witness and weigh the evidence. You can reach a conclusion:

1 - do you believe they had an experience as they described?

2 - what do you think can explain what they saw and experienced?

The Pseudoskeptic wants to act like all events are weighed equally which is ASININE!

edit on 15-8-2019 by neoholographic because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 04:37 AM
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a reply to: neoholographic

Would have to agree with you about Nickell, McGaha (and all other members of CSI / CSICOP) being 'true believer' agenda based pseudo-sceptics mate and there's a good definition here if you've not seen it before - there's also quite a number of other Pascagoula UFO eye-witness testimonies found on this thread.



"Everybody was seeing UFOs," recalled retired Mississippi Press Managing Editor Don Broadus.

A Pascagoula city councilman said he saw a luminous UFO the same night of Hickson's and Parker's report on the way to a church service in Vancleave.

"That's our story and we're stuck with it," E. P. Sigalas said.

Pascagoula Patrolman Bill Gennaro stopped on Beach Boulevard to talk with a group of people and they saw an oblong-shaped, blue-haze object zip to the north.

About 3,000 motorists from Mobile blocked Interstate 10 when they heard of a possible rendezvous with UFOs at the Mississippi line.

A cab driver in Biloxi said a UFO caused his taxi to stall out on U.S. 90..


link


Cheers.
edit on 15-8-2019 by karl 12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 06:33 AM
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originally posted by: karl 12
a reply to: neoholographic

Would have to agree with you about Nickell, McGaha (and all other members of CSI / CSICOP) being 'true believer' agenda based pseudo-sceptics mate and there's a good definition here if you've not seen it before - there's also quite a number of other Pascagoula UFO eye-witness testimonies found on this thread.



"Everybody was seeing UFOs," recalled retired Mississippi Press Managing Editor Don Broadus.

A Pascagoula city councilman said he saw a luminous UFO the same night of Hickson's and Parker's report on the way to a church service in Vancleave.

"That's our story and we're stuck with it," E. P. Sigalas said.

Pascagoula Patrolman Bill Gennaro stopped on Beach Boulevard to talk with a group of people and they saw an oblong-shaped, blue-haze object zip to the north.

About 3,000 motorists from Mobile blocked Interstate 10 when they heard of a possible rendezvous with UFOs at the Mississippi line.

A cab driver in Biloxi said a UFO caused his taxi to stall out on U.S. 90..


link


Cheers.


Great post!


Thanks for the links and there were a lot of eyewitnesses who saw a similar U.F.O. in the area around the time of Parker and Hickson's experience. Sadly, pseudoskeptics look at a couple of people that didn't see anything and that's supposed to invalidate all eyewitnesses. Twisted logic!

Also, Nickell's is a Professional pseudoskeptic that makes really good money being skeptical of everything. Yet, people on this board accuse everyone around Ufology of having ulterior motives but these Professional skeptics are 100% pure with no motive yet there making a really good living being Professional pseudoskeptics.



posted on Aug, 15 2019 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: neoholographic

For me, this case remains one of the most extraordinary examples in ufology. What it IS remains a mystery, but what seems beyond a shadow of a doubt is that Parker and Hickson had both experienced a disturbing, potentially anomalous incident that genuinely terrified them. The secret police audio recording of them speaking together is quite a unique piece of evidence in itself, but even that doesn't compare to the aura of honesty projected by them when confronted in person. Hynek palpably felt that, as did NASA astronaut James McDivitt.

McDivitt himself witnessed and photographed a still-unexplained UFO (even Jim Oberg tentatively accepts that conclusion) from Gemini IV during a 4-day mission in 1965 - the pic was subsequently lost, presumed dumped by developers rather than part of a sinister conspiracy. Anyway, in a delightfully cheesy but at times compelling 1970s documentary, Journeys From Beyond Earth, McDivitt had this to say about meeting Hickson:


I know all kinds of people who claim to have seen [UFOs]. Some of them are very legitimate, and I think some of them are having fun. I had an opportunity recently to meet a gentleman from Mississippi who claims to have been taken in a spacecraft, and quite frankly I believe that that gentleman is telling what he considers to be the truth.

He wasn't looking for publicity, he wasn't trying to be funny, he was trying to be very honest. He was very sincere and, quite frankly, I walked away from the whole conversation with him believing that what he said is true as far as he is concerned.



I don't think confabulation applies here, either. Their account seemed immediate and spontaneous rather than planned, contrived and subsequently infused with genuine self-belief.

It remains a chilling case to this day.


edit on 15-8-2019 by ConfusedBrit because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2019 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: neoholographic

A few weeks/months back there was a thread on the Hickinson/Parker encounter relating something about a plaque or something commemorating the whole thing. That’s when I first read about Parker’s apprehension and reluctance to discuss the encounter and why he now feels comfortable discussing it. It stands to reason — at least to me — that some people will naturally acquiesce to the perceived (and very real) skepticism and ridicule and simply not mention it or report it. Parker’s reasoning is sound.

And those were some very salient points regarding the Joe Nickell’s of the world and their gainful employment prospects...

One thing about your premise on medical examinations in abduction encounters: I would suggest that any entity, endowed with the information and computing resources you have suggested, would use those resources to simply recreate the past — and any and all information — to find the ‘cure’.

At any rate, thanks for the thread



posted on Aug, 16 2019 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: Cravens
One thing about your premise on medical examinations in abduction encounters: I would suggest that any entity, endowed with the information and computing resources you have suggested, would use those resources to simply recreate the past — and any and all information — to find the ‘cure’.

Not everything can be recorded or reconstructed. If they needed a DNA sample specifically from Alexander the Great for some crazy reason, do you think they could reconstruct it?

And just who were those "strangers" hanging out at Jesus's tomb, anyway?
edit on 16-8-2019 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2019 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: neoholographic

The day we finaly make a genuinely powerful A. I. that can accelerate its own learning and intelligence is the beginning of the end of the human race potentialy.
At some point its going to figure out it doesn't need humans, and if it excapes out of our control we will be in massive trouble.
edit on 16-8-2019 by Rhombus101 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2019 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Maybe not recorded contemporaneously but available for transcription at some ‘future’ date. And your either naive or not up to date on the resourcefulness of 21st century genealogical libraries because your DNA is there whether you offered it up.

Not to mention both Einstein’s and quantum physics are governed by irrevocable probabilities which a sufficiently capable computer could recreate the past using. Don’t know what the p-value would have to be to ‘guarantee’ an exact replica but given the premise those computing resources are available it would be achieved.

Got nothing for the riff-raff loitering outside some guy’s tomb.



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 12:34 AM
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I knew them both but more though family and mutual friends. Charlie was a heavy drinker at times so a lot of people discounted his story. Parker was not. I believe he may have Spent some time on a mental faculty or something, as he really had a hard time with all this. Locally this is what gave this credibility. Charlie may be just screwing around but everyone could tell something traumatic happened that screwed Parker out.

No for the rest of the story. Charlie claimed that they told both of them they they would be watching both of them. They were powerless to stop them from that or grabbing them again. This is what Charlie said screwed up Parker. The “watchers” are well known in North Jackson County and George Country and stories go back hundreds of years among Indian populations etc. I have had a few encounters and Mufon was hot on the continuation of this story until they were bought out.

I dont think these things have gone anywhere and are still here. I have pretty good idea where, if anyone wants to go alien hunting. (Lol) I doubt you will ever be seen again, and I am not ready to disappear yet, they have made their point with me.

a reply to: neoholographic



posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 12:43 AM
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And this bull# about bridge tenders is a joke, one was horrible alcoholic and both were probably sleeping. Me and my buddies used to fish on the wooden railroad bridges all the time as they were loaded with barnacles and hence black drum, sheepshead, redfish and flounder. It was of course trespassing. I think these acutely aware bridge tenders ran us off once in maybe 50 times and that was in the day. They apparently never saw us the other 49 times even though it was daylight, we were there for hours each time, making noise and catching fish and waived to the trains that passed. So give me a break, if they can’t see a group of kids fishing in the daytime 100 yards away 4 dozen times then what chance do they have to see some lights 1/2 a mile away.

a reply to: Jackfish28



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