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A new analysis of the Pascagoula abduction

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posted on Aug, 17 2019 @ 03:54 PM
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Pretty awesome tale.

These Police secret recording lends the story some credence....unless we find the copper was their drinking fishing buddy




posted on Aug, 20 2019 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

Good call Zazz, researcher Phil Mantle also makes some interesting comments in this vid citing a document found in the CUFON archives describing the witnesses having 'puncture wounds'.






originally posted by: neoholographic

He then says something came out of the ceiling and examined his head.


Very strange and does sound a bit similar to this freaky case from Scotland.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Cheers.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 02:18 AM
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originally posted by: neoholographic

On the other hand, Parker stayed out of the limelight for 45 years and this is his first book about the incident. The young man did see the abduction event. He was the one that was very scared and talked about the event when they went to Police.

Again, Parker has no motive to lie. Hickson passed a polygraph and Parker didn't seek to capitalize on this situation when Professional pseudoskeptic make a lot of money being skeptical about everything. They will probably question there name if they could make money off of it.

There were other eyewitnesses.


Some of their claims:

- 30 foot UFO with a little dome on top and two flashing blue lights.
- A door opens and 3 floating alien beings come out of the craft.
- 4 to 5 foot aliens that had elephant-like wrinkled skin, triangle shaped ears (Hickson says they must have been antennas), seemed mechanical like robots, and had claws instead of hands.
- They were taken aboard the craft and put on a examination table and Charles Hickson said a giant eyeball came out of the wall and examined him, he could see dials and gadgets moving around.
Parker claimed a female-featured alien placed her long fingers down his throat to examine the back.
And many other claims throughout the years.

The entire incident they describe reads more like a collection of bad Sci-Fi movies, UFO lore, and comic books than a real life event that can be taken seriously. What they describe seems to be reflective of the time they grew up and is unoriginal. Can you not see the human influences in their tale?
- A giant football-sized eyeball that moves around and examines Hickson - straight out of War of the Worlds.
- Robotic-like creatures with movements as if the aliens are carrying out orders - The Day the Earth Stood Still.
- Moving dials and gadgets - any sci-fi movie or TV show from the 50s on.
- UFO description - straight out of UFO lore complete with a dome on top (I guess observation domes aren't popular with alien ships these days? )
- Aliens with claws for hands - any UFO comic book of the 50s.
- Nonsensical flashing, attention grabbing, blue lights.
- Abduction and examination - Betty and Barney Hill case.
Yet you're arguing and pointing fingers at the skeptical? You should begin and approach any incident with a grounded and skeptical mind and point of view and work out from there. You don't approach it believing they're being truthful.

There's absolutely no basis to build a believable case on with either man. No proof with them nor within the entire 70+ year history of phenomenon to give an ounce of credibility to their abduction story. Unless you think the story in itself is proof enough, in which I'd like you to point out where and show the evidence. A light in the sky by other witnesses also doesn't make for a stronger case of their physical abduction, without evidence.

The threshold of evidence shouldn't be held to such low standards when tales like this are told. It's this type of nonsense mindset and thinking that give these silly cases any publicity.



posted on Aug, 21 2019 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: Ectoplasm8

The threshold of evidence shouldn't be held to such low standards when tales like this are told. It's this type of nonsense mindset and thinking that give these silly cases any publicity.


I've sought out and admired your work on ATS, Ectoplasm8 (your classic underrated Roswell thread is an abject lesson in practical scepticism).


In this case, there is no doubt that virtually every detail of their account can be compared to cultural moments in sci-fi film, TV and literature. I initially laughed my socks off at those surface details and how crass they sounded, but that is not what makes the case so fascinating.

Brush aside the pulp sci-fi and we're left with two blokes who genuinely seemed to experience a truly disturbing event. When J. Allen Hynek (still in his sceptical phase), James McDivitt (a sceptic who hasn't participated in the UFOtainment circuit like other astronauts we could mention) and others spoke to them personally, they had no shadow of a doubt that these men believed their own story. That doesn't prove anything of course, but it's food for thought.

I'm usually very cautious about these cases, but I don't sense confabulation at work here, either, so what DID happen to them if it wasn't an anomalous event? Why would those pulpy images be implanted within their memories and minds? And why did they discuss the event as if it were real during the secret police recording?

The degree of sheer absurdity in their account is interesting in itself. Perhaps Jacques Vallee would have a few theories about that aspect. As it is, this is a BIZARRE and rather unique case in many respects.



edit on 21-8-2019 by ConfusedBrit because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 23 2019 @ 01:34 AM
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a reply to: ConfusedBrit

When a fantastical claim of alien abduction like this is made, in lieu of actual evidence, you have to be skeptical. Those that support and buy into alien beings on Earth, seem to conveniently leave out parts of stories to make for a better case of aliens. It's done on this forum all of the time. They're less than genuine when telling the tale. Their view is skewed towards believing and this is why researching these cases for yourself is important. To come to your own conclusion, not someone elses. This incident is not without question.

Some questionable points:

Both Hickson and Parker initially went to the local newspaper that night with this story. They were closed and they ended up going to the sheriffs office. This doesn't sound like two men hiding from the limelight, seems like they were looking for publicity.

While both men agreed, only Hickson took the polygraph test. At the time of the polygraph, their lawyer refused testing by local experienced polygraph operators or by a respected tester from Mobile. Instead, he requested a polygraph operator 100+ miles away in New Orleans. This tester happened to work for a friend of the lawyer and had not completed his polygraph training and wasn't certified. You have to question why he was used.

In later interviews, Parker expanded on his story. He also claimed the same craft visited him 19 years later. He goes on to describe walking aboard the craft and coming in contact with the same feminine featured alien he did in 1973. This time the alien spoke to him about religion telling him they share the same god and the Bible is genuine text. She also said her species wanted to live on Earth but couldn't because of our own self-destructive behavior. This speaks to Parkers character.

Two 24-hour toll booths were in view of the abduction. Why didn't either operator report seeing flashing blue lights or a blinding white light as described by Hickson? He claimed the abduction lasted from 20 minutes to an hour, plenty of time to view these lights. Flashing blue lights would be attention grabbing to anyone. There's a reason they're used by police departments.

Piggybacking on the creative minds of others, such as writers, artists, film makers, etc. makes coming up with a visual story easy, in particular for those lacking much originality and imagination. Besides the total lack of evidence, the descriptions seem to me to be too closely influenced by human interpretations of aliens. 



posted on Aug, 23 2019 @ 05:09 PM
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Posts like that are what can cause threads like this to screech to a halt.



originally posted by: Ectoplasm8
... and this is why researching these cases for yourself is important. To come to your own conclusion, not someone elses. This incident is not without question.


Agreed. Roswell being a prime example, and one of the first monoliths of ufology to tumble as soon as I joined ATS exactly a year ago this week after a 20-year hiatus from reading up on this kooky subject.

I freely admit that I hadn't dug deep into THIS case beyond the most well-known points - eg the police recording being the main headline grabber - which naturally leaves out...


Some questionable points:


And I'm all ears...


Both Hickson and Parker initially went to the local newspaper that night with this story. They were closed and they ended up going to the sheriffs office. This doesn't sound like two men hiding from the limelight, seems like they were looking for publicity.


And there ya go - news to me. That they went to the press the same night rather than initially calling the cops first is like a red flag flapping in a hurricane. I didn't know that. Suddenly even the potential for confabulation gives way to more fundamental suspicions.

(Off-topic, but a current thread I created about the 1952 Stock UFO photos includes mitigating circumstances such as Stock's friend 'betraying' him by selling the pics to the press without his permission, supporting the theory that Stock wasn't a publicity-seeker. But who's to say that this wasn't the grand plan from the start?)


While both men agreed, only Hickson took the polygraph test. At the time of the polygraph, their lawyer refused testing by local experienced polygraph operators or by a respected tester from Mobile. Instead, he requested a polygraph operator 100+ miles away in New Orleans. This tester happened to work for a friend of the lawyer and had not completed his polygraph training and wasn't certified. You have to question why he was used.


That flag's flapping even more violently, my friend. And we've seen that kind of behaviour in other 'classic' cases.


In later interviews, Parker expanded on his story. He also claimed the same craft visited him 19 years later. He goes on to describe walking aboard the craft and coming in contact with the same feminine featured alien he did in 1973. This time the alien spoke to him about religion telling him they share the same god and the Bible is genuine text. She also said her species wanted to live on Earth but couldn't because of our own self-destructive behavior. This speaks to Parkers character.


Oh Jeezus... Parker started suffering from a severe case of Pennistonitus... and a heavy dose of the God Squad.

Add in the 24/7 toll booths and, mannnn, you sure know how to spoil the party, Ecto - but such info is crucial, so I tip my hat to you. Your mighty Roswell thread again springs to mind.


Even if I harbour a slightly lingering sense of...



But that's my fault for being lazy and not researching further.

Are we now considering a couple of men who could pocket Oscars without breaking into a sweat? And does this bring the 'secrecy' of the police recording into a more serious round of questioning?

And if these two fellas were still Brando-ing it to the full even whilst believing they were alone, that sure is dedication to their art - if not also an indication of a few loose marbles into the bargain if this whole case was indeed a hoax from the start.




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