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Do oysters suffer?

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posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:19 AM
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I like oysters - in fact, I love them.
But now the question: do oysters suffer when they die?

That brief moment of clarity between coming out of your shell, and being eaten.
Should I as an apex predator (evolutionary speaking) care what an oyster thinks?
Well yeah, everything on the planet gives you a sign, and is connected.

Thank you, dear oyster, I appreciate your honesty.
Down the hatch, I say.




posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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What would an oyster think?
Screw you dear human, in my next life I make you eat crap.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: halfoldman

I doubt they have a brain capable of complex ideas pleasure and suffering.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:25 AM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
I like oysters - in fact, I love them.
But now the question: do oysters suffer when they die?

That brief moment of clarity between coming out of your shell, and being eaten.
Should I as an apex predator (evolutionary speaking) care what an oyster thinks?
Well yeah, everything on the planet gives you a sign, and is connected.

Thank you, dear oyster, I appreciate your honesty.
Down the hatch, I say.


If you were an oyster would you like it if someone took you out of your perfect watery environment, cracked open your unwilling shell, and then slowly pulled your flesh from the only home you've known. Then the only question that would be left, would be if you were going to be eaten alive, or cooked a slow, spicy death.

Yea, probably, but since you are human, gobble away. Don't worry, someday you'll be dust, and maybe even float in the ocean, and maybe an oyster will eat part of you, and I'm sure it will not give it a second thought.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
I like oysters - in fact, I love them.
But now the question: do oysters suffer when they die?

That brief moment of clarity between coming out of your shell, and being eaten.
Should I as an apex predator (evolutionary speaking) care what an oyster thinks?
Well yeah, everything on the planet gives you a sign, and is connected.

Thank you, dear oyster, I appreciate your honesty.
Down the hatch, I say.


Love me some good oysters. That burst of seawater, salt, and sweetness.

I guess I just never thought about them being alive when eaten. I think the shucking actually kills them though. I don't usually chew them, so I imagine their experience is like a Sarlacc... being digested slowly over a thousand years.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:42 AM
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Canned oysters.

The "chicken of the sea" indeed.

Very high in protein.




posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Im partial to clams...little neck, and chowder.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:16 PM
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Oysters in the army:

"There's a seven grams of fat, five grams of carbs, nine grams of protein and there is absolutely no fiber!"



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:24 PM
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Brother, all I can share with you is nine grams.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:31 PM
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Before you is Stalin, behind you is Hitler.

Like the oyster, I prefer to be immobilized for now.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:35 PM
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Helen - It's a great question and something that stirs up seafood lovers a lot. You've got your oyster there; you're shucking it away, adding a squeeze of lemon juice, and they say you should see the oyster twitching if you put lemon juice on it; this shows they can sense chemicals and they can sense things going on.

Do they feel pain? Great question. I think the answer has to be probably not, but we don't really know.

www.thenakedscientists.com...



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Sometimes, I find them in stores (and buy a lot of those yummy smoked oysters in tin boxes!).

It seems there is a rejection in shops around here or in Germany or EU generally against these, maybe there *are* some bad chemicals in them?

Usually I see them in above-average delicatessen stores. But I have found some in Aldi-like stores, too, and those are considered cheap but reliable stores in Germany. Discounter stores, but their quality control is usually above average.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:49 PM
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Everybody says McDonald's is so bad.

As far as fast-food goes, the cheapest and greenest company ever.

I only got cardboard and paper.

No plastic crap whatsoever.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 12:53 PM
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You do realize that in medieval times the "fork" was considered evil, and from the devil?

God gave you hands, why do need such a thing?

Not only is it pointless, but you are challenging the order of creation.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 01:31 PM
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Chinese toilet filters... used to be something, not now. Toxic right out of the can!



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 01:38 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

No but crabs and lobsters definitely do when being boiled or fried alive. That's why crabs try to climb out of the pot and pull each other back into the water in the process. They know it's bad, it hurts, and it's killing them.

I feel the same is true for roaches and other insects. They writhe in agony from getting sprayed with pesticide like raid. If you only hit them with a little bit of it, it takes longer for it to work, if it even completely kills them, and you can see that they do not like it one bit.

An osyter is just like a little blob thing that filters the trash out of ocean water, building itself physically off of trash and waste to plump up for you to eat. Kind of like shrimp. The bottom dwellers that are a staple of seafood are glorified roaches and the ocean equivalent of sewer creatures.

I don't eat shrimp either because it's a floating insect with a string of poo in it. And all of it smells horrible, I can never get over pungent seafood smell. And why do women who don't wash smell like that? It's supposed to be a bad smell to tell your brain not to go there. Instead, they eat it.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 01:42 PM
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Of course oysters suffer when you eat them. I had some raw oysters when I was in Florida one year, I won't do that again. I ate the first one like the other people said to do, loosen it from the shell and slip it down. Oh hell, I thought it was going to jump out my belly, if flopped around like a fish out of water when it hit my stomach acid. Worse than I would have ever suspected, as bad as the time I ate a whole live smelt, swallowing it down like a seagul.

I bought a half dozen of them, I stabbed the hell out of another one, that didn't flop but chewing it sucked. The rest I gave to one of the other customers there, he loved them. I ordered a fish and chips, making sure it was cooked and dead.



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:06 PM
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www.youtube.com...


now don't it sadden you ??



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

I'll eat certain fish, but I'm even picky on that. I had a blackened tuna steak, caught recently at an expensive restaurant in Murrell's Inlet, SC when I was there on a trip once.

That was good, really good. It cost almost $20 and this was 13 years ago but it was pretty good. When I was a kid in the St. Louis area, fried catfish was awesome.

Now that I live in VA, near the coast no less, the only seafood I eat is a Filet o' Fish sandwich from Mcdonalds or a piece of fried fish from Long John Silvers, although I like their chicken better.

It's shaped like the fish, fried in the same type of batter as the fish, hell almost tastes similar, but it's not fish. I think they use Alaskan Pollock but not sure anymore.



Compared with pollock, Alaska pollock has a milder taste, whiter color and lower oil content.

High-quality, single-frozen whole Alaska pollock fillets may be layered into a block mold and deep-frozen to produce fish blocks that are used throughout Europe and North America as the raw material for high-quality breaded and battered fish products. Lower-quality, double-frozen fillets or minced trim pieces may also be frozen in block forms and used as raw material for lower-quality, low-cost breaded and battered fish sticks and portions.

Single-frozen Alaska pollock is considered to be the premier raw material for surimi; the most common use of surimi in the United States is imitation crabmeat (also known as crab stick).[citation needed]

Alaska pollock is commonly used in the fast food industry, in products such as McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich and (now-discontinued) Fish McBites,[23] Arby's Classic Fish sandwich,[24] Long John Silver's Baja Fish Taco,[25]Birds Eye's Fish Fingers in Crispy Batter.[26] and Captain D's Seafood Kitchen.[27]


Milder taste no wonder it's good.

I remember going to a friends house as a teen, nice upper middle class house. I asked why it smelled like fish so bad, and this was a pungent ass all permeating smell. My friend said his mom cooked fish for dinner yesterday.
edit on 4/18/2019 by r0xor because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2019 @ 02:31 PM
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This entire topic is just wrong! I mean it should be posted in the Cooking forum for science sake.




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