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New Galaxy Discovered By Accident

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posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 11:48 PM
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This is really interesting

New Dwarf Galaxy Discovered By Hubble


Hubble's sharp vision uncovered a never-before-seen dwarf galaxy located far behind the cluster's crowded stellar population. The loner galaxy is in our own cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away (approximately 2,300 times farther than the foreground cluster).The object is classified as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy because it measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent (barely 1/30th the diameter of the Milky Way), and it is roughly a thousand times dimmer than the Milky Way. Because of its 13-billion-year-old age, and its isolation — which resulted in hardly any interaction with other galaxies — the dwarf is the astronomical equivalent of a living fossil from the early universe.


Wouldn't that be an interesting Galaxy to visit.




posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

I have a question about the picture of the universe they use. I understand it to be a 360 degree view from Earth or the hubble telescope laid flat pretty much, right? More or less?

Ok, when you get to the faintest dots, the furthest objects measurable, and into the black spaces between them, is the theory that there's more objects beyond this but they're too far for the hubble to see? Or that there's really nothing beyond that point that we know of? Because I remember reading that the hubble could see all the way back to the early days of the universe.
edit on 2/1/2019 by r0xor because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

There are many ways to travel:




posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:20 AM
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originally posted by: r0xor
a reply to: Blue_Jay33

I have a question about the picture of the universe they use. I understand it to be a 360 degree view from Earth or the hubble telescope laid flat pretty much, right? More or less?

Ok, when you get to the faintest dots, the furthest objects measurable, and into the black spaces between them, is the theory that there's more objects beyond this but they're too far for the hubble to see? Or that there's really nothing beyond that point that we know of? Because I remember reading that the hubble could see all the way back to the early days of the universe.


The Hubble can only see as far as the light has traveled to us/it since the birth of the universe.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: r0xor

Some of the faintest stars are closer than some brighter ones due to obstruction, light pollution from neighboring stars, etc.

You're right that optical based resolution is pretty spotty the further out you look which is why we generally rely on infrared which allows us to see the 'observable limits' aka the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation.

There's also a lot of just empty space and the theoretical diameter of the universe is something like 97 billion light years, so if every possible light source was the same brightness from our viewpoint, the majority of the sky would be bright. Due to redshifting though, we only 'see' at most 13.7 billion light years. This limit is represented as the CMB radiation.

As to Hubble seeing the beginnings of the universe aka the CMB; that was challenged not too long ago which is why the theoretical size of the universe is now ~97 billion light years. We realized that 13.7 billion light years is just the furthest we'll ever be able to see using anything that follows the 'nothing faster than light' law and those distant stars have been moving away from us so in a few billion years, the sky will be darker and far fewer galaxies will be observable as they've moved past the observable limit.

I need to go to sleep lol




posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: r0xor

That's right, the Hubble can see to the edge of the observable galaxy - observable galaxy being: the light has had enough time to reach us.
And yes, the theory is that there are more objects beyond those faintest dots of light.
currently in the observable universe, there are 2 trillion galaxies.

I cant even picture that number



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 05:52 AM
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a reply to: r0xor

As odd as it sounds, our universe has a horizon, and that horizon changes depending on where we are, but the horizon is always the same distance wherever you are. The horizon is based on the speed of light, and the amount of time the light has had to travel. With the universe being 13.6 billion years old, the horizon is 13.6 billion light years. Light further away than that is unobservable except via means of redshift. It's an oddly self-gratifying thing because wherever you are in the universe seems like the center of the universe.

This shorts 5 minute video will change the way you understand observable space, it's very succinct.




posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 08:10 AM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: r0xor

...currently in the observable universe, there are 2 trillion galaxies.

I cant even picture that number


2 trillion and 1, as of this discovery



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 12:37 PM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: r0xor

currently in the observable universe, there are 2 trillion galaxies.


So what's the big deal that someone found one more?



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
So what's the big deal that someone found one more?

Exactly. Let's see. Three thousand light years away. That means if we started traveling to it tomorrow, it would take us roughly... forever to get there.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Just when you think you have enough Galaxies another one pops up , wonder how many other hidden Galaxies are out there waiting to be discovered.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: gortex

200 billion or more. Who know's what's out there - It's as incomprehensible as it is depressing.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

A star for the find..



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Oops , Nothing to See here . Oh , Wait ! WTF ?..................) The History of Maqnkind ......



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: wtfatta

A single universe isn't logical
similar to the expression of hubris in believing man is the most important.

Outside the universe, beyond the horizon, is unimagined space. I don't think it is one
of many bubbles but a fractal node in an infinite universes, not all are 97 billion light years in diameter some could be
100 times bigger than ours.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: ThatDidHappen
a reply to: wtfatta
A single universe isn't logical
similar to the expression of hubris in believing man is the most important.

Uh, excuse me... but humans are the best. No brag, just fact.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: ThatDidHappen

Who said anything about a singular universe? You assume so much just to adopt a "higher" ground. What other things can you assume I said? Aliens are lizard chickens? ET just wanted to call 1-900 numbers instead of home? Oh! I know! Santa Claus is real but he's tied up in my basement...

If you're going to speak, try to pay attention first lest you reveal yourself to be a fool.



posted on Feb, 1 2019 @ 10:06 PM
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2 trillion and 1 but I learned something! Knowing is half of the battle.

Up to 13.6 billion light years of distance can be observed because the universe is that old. Light older than that, if it existed, we wouldn't be able to see. If there were universes beyond 13.6 billion years (I know, I'm looking 13.6 billion years back in time as if I had a time travel viewing device of sorts in the wrong way), we wouldn't be able to see them because the light hasn't reached us yet? What if it reached us tomorrow? Would the telescope be able to see it then?



posted on Feb, 4 2019 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: r0xor

13.8 billion ly is the estimated age of the universe. It is not observed directly but calculated based on a model.

Due to expansion the radius of the currently observable universe is ~46 billion ly. This means that is how far the objects are away from us right now. The light we see is from the past though when those objects were much closer. So I am not sure how useful it is.

The total visibility limit would be at 62 billion ly. So in the future we might see some more stars and galaxies, extremely red-shifted. But anything past the limit is "gone", has no effect on our observable universe.
edit on 4-2-2019 by moebius because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 4 2019 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: schuyler
So what's the big deal that someone found one more?

Exactly. Let's see. Three thousand light years away. That means if we started traveling to it tomorrow, it would take us roughly... forever to get there.


30 million LY away.
The 3000 LY was its size (a dwarf galaxy).



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