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CNN:Hundreds of migrants cross Arizona border after 'several busloads' dropped off in Mexico

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posted on Jan, 30 2019 @ 01:35 PM
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I recently saw a clip of several tons of "slime eels" (Hagfish) sliming up a highway after a mishap in the US.

I couldn't help but think, why not slime the southern US border, and especially the routes towards it?
Make it several miles of slime.

Perhaps these critters could even be "milked" for their slime.





posted on Jan, 30 2019 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: pavil

originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: pavil
a reply to: chr0naut


Your President declared people, who had not entered your country, as illegal. That is prejudicial and a lie.


What are you talking about? There is a legal way to enter the country. If people don't follow those ways, what would you call it?

What country are you from if I may ask?


There are many legal ways to enter the US, not just one.

Crossing the border, surrendering to border patrols and requesting asylum, IS a legal way to enter the country.

I am an Australian citizen. I live in New Zealand. I can commute when I feel like it. My passport is good in both countries.



So how do you feel about Australia's policy of people claiming Asylum who arrive in Australia illegally?

The hearings for people who enter illegally in the US should be quick and a determination to deport or grant asylum should follow. That doesn't happen currently.

Our system is broken as we release those people into our country while they wait for their court date. A significant proportion of those people never show up for that hearing.

Only 20 to 30% of people claiming asylum are granted that and the rate of people claiming asylum has gone up over 1,600% the last decade or so. People have figured out how to abuse our immigration policies.

The immigration courts here are backlogged by over 800,000 cases and it's been as high as a Million.


Australia complies with UN agreements on asylum seekers.

Most are detained until the can be granted asylum and integrated into Australian society.

The greatest concern for the Australian government is that refugees and asylum seekers often do not survive the ocean journey to reach our shores. It is a safety and humanitarian issue.

Here's some Statistics on people in detention in Australia.



posted on Jan, 30 2019 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Yes they are detained in Australia. Per your link:


There is no time limit on immigration detention in Australia. This means that, under Australian law, a person can be detained indefinitely – theoretically for the course of their natural life – unless the Australian Government decides to grant them a visa, or they agree to leave the country. Even in cases where a person has been found to pose no risk to the community, or where continued detention is causing a person serious harm, the Australian Government is under no legal obligation to release them from detention.

Most detention sites aren't even in Australia as they outsource it to islands nearby.

That's not how it is in the US as I've just explained above and you see the Clusterf%×# that's happens as the abuse of the system happens.



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: chr0naut

Guess you gave up when I used your own source to show how caring Australia is with Illegal Immigrants who try to enter huh?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 05:11 PM
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originally posted by: pavil
a reply to: chr0naut

Guess you gave up when I used your own source to show how caring Australia is with Illegal Immigrants who try to enter huh?


No, I'm still here I just had some server issues to sort out.

Nor did I deny that Australia detains immigrants until they can be granted a visa or be repatriated. I actually stated it just a few posts above.

edit on 31/1/2019 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: pavil
a reply to: chr0naut

Yes they are detained in Australia. Per your link:


There is no time limit on immigration detention in Australia. This means that, under Australian law, a person can be detained indefinitely – theoretically for the course of their natural life – unless the Australian Government decides to grant them a visa, or they agree to leave the country. Even in cases where a person has been found to pose no risk to the community, or where continued detention is causing a person serious harm, the Australian Government is under no legal obligation to release them from detention.

Most detention sites aren't even in Australia as they outsource it to islands nearby.

That's not how it is in the US as I've just explained above and you see the Clusterf%×# that's happens as the abuse of the system happens.


Australia has 10 operational detention centers (a lot are closed). Only one of them, Naruru, is an island.

The US has 373 operational detention centers and two of them (the Monroe County Detention Center in Key West and the Hudson County Correctional Center) are on islands.

Your point?



posted on Jan, 31 2019 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: chr0naut

originally posted by: pavil
a reply to: chr0naut

Yes they are detained in Australia. Per your link:


There is no time limit on immigration detention in Australia. This means that, under Australian law, a person can be detained indefinitely – theoretically for the course of their natural life – unless the Australian Government decides to grant them a visa, or they agree to leave the country. Even in cases where a person has been found to pose no risk to the community, or where continued detention is causing a person serious harm, the Australian Government is under no legal obligation to release them from detention.

Most detention sites aren't even in Australia as they outsource it to islands nearby.

That's not how it is in the US as I've just explained above and you see the Clusterf%×# that's happens as the abuse of the system happens.


Australia has 10 operational detention centers (a lot are closed). Only one of them, Naruru, is an island.

The US has 373 operational detention centers and two of them (the Monroe County Detention Center in Key West and the Hudson County Correctional Center) are on islands.

Your point?


My point is we don't detain every illegal immigrant like Australia and that is the problem with the backlog of cases. People who enter illegally, then only claim Asylum when they get caught have been abusing the system.

We need to stop them from entering out country except at designated ports of entry, not crossing over Illegally. Hence the need for a physical barrier as well as more manpower and technology on the border barrier system.

It would help if Mexico did more on their side of the border to help as well.

I started this thread to show that without a barrier in the first place to stop people, it's only making the problem worse as more and more people just walk across the border with no barrier to speak of. The sensors, cameras and drones will not stop them from arriving on US soil Illegally.



We don't have mandatory immigration detention for everyone who enters our country illegally. Australia detains them till their case is heard.



posted on Feb, 4 2019 @ 03:09 AM
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originally posted by: grey580
Build a wall they said.

Stop people it would they said.



Our wall will have a few feet of razor wire on top of it, nice try though.




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