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Brexit, Today is the Vote!

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posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: ipsedixit

You mean tax avoiders like these?

Labour Run Councils in £12M Tax Avoidance




You sound like you believe in politics as it is practiced in the US and the UK, that is oligarchical bought and paid for representation of the elite by and for the elite.


If that's how I sound like to you then may I respectfully suggest that you look into getting a hearing aid.




posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

I don't think so. You seem to want to score points off Labour, but this is a bipartisan problem in the UK.

Legislation in parliament has created tax havens in various places around the globe, places that are still controlled by the UK. The government, of whichever party could put finish to all of that if it wanted to, but it would have to go against the wishes of the wealthiest people in Britain and no party will do that because MPs of all parties depend on these people for donations to their campaigns.

This is a problem in the developed world. It just so happens that the current government in the UK is Tory, so the Tories get the flack for it, but until the issue of tax avoidance is tackled seriously, all are to blame for the budgetary problems of governments.
edit on 19-3-2019 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: ipsedixit

Well yes, that's pretty much stating the obvious. It's hypocrisy that I can't stand.

Unfortunately, Labour do have form for wrecking the UK economy regardless of any of that.
edit on 19-3-2019 by oldcarpy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:18 AM
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Corbyn and May are not much different. They are both playing the "game" of political posturing while staying well away from real solutions to tax avoidance, and tax avoidance and evasion is the real reason that Britain is hard pressed for cash and forced to cut services and go on the cheap in every way possible.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: ipsedixit

Corbyn and May are very, very different. Tax evasion/avoidance is far from the sole reason for our country's economic woes.

And, there may well be demonstrations - but the fact is the UK voted to leave the EU so remainers can demonstrate all they like, but they lost.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:28 AM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy
a reply to: ipsedixit

Corbyn and May are very, very different. Tax evasion/avoidance is far from the sole reason for our country's economic woes.

And, there may well be demonstrations - but the fact is the UK voted to leave the EU so remainers can demonstrate all they like, but they lost.


And look how happy your representives are to follow your vote. Somethings a bit... off, right?



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

No kidding?!!!

Yes, I had noticed that, thanks.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:42 AM
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Satire:




posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: ipsedixit
...the world leaders in tax havens and government assisted tax avoidance.


I think you are talking about Luxembourg and the Republic of Ireland who are the countries that have got (and continue to get) rich out of the big global concerns e.g. Amazon and Apple. These two countries collect tax from across Europe for their own ends. At least an independent UK will be able to levy taxes on business done in the UK and get the tax into the coffers.

This would be scam set up in Luxembourg by the (er) now President of the EU, a certain Jean-Claude Juncker. If you look into this you'll see he conspired with the Republic of Ireland to create a pan EU tax avoidance scheme that made both countries rich and the expense of other EU countries. There's a reason why Apple paid three quid in tax to the UK!



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy

Corbyn and May are very, very different.


They are both political posers.


Tax evasion/avoidance is far from the sole reason for our country's economic woes.


Your country can't tolerate the amount of tax avoidance going on and nobody else can tolerate the degree to which the UK helps a vast assortment of criminals and oligarchical types avoid taxes in their own countries.


And, there may well be demonstrations - but the fact is the UK voted to leave the EU so remainers can demonstrate all they like, but they lost.


Don't be quite so dismissive of 49% of the country. This wasn't a normal and reversible, election.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: ipsedixit




Don't be quite so dismissive of 49% of the country. This wasn't a normal and reversible, election.


It was not an election, it was a referendum. With a winner and a loser. The one with the most vote's wins. It's called democracy.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

If parliament authorizes another referendum there will be another referendum.
edit on 19-3-2019 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: oldcarpy



Austerity was the result of the last Labour govt near bankrupting the country.


Sorry mate, got to disagree with you on this.

It was the bankers who nearly bankrupt this country.
Blair, Brown et al decided to bail them out.

There was also a global financial crisis....hardly the fault of The Labour Party.

Austerity was sold on the premise that we needed to reduce The National Debt.
National Debt has consistently increased since The Tories came into power in 2010.
www.ukpublicspending.co.uk...

Tory claims were, as is usual with all political parties, a manipulation of facts - being a sort of statistician in another life I know full well how easy it is to manipulate figures in order to fit a desired agenda.
fullfact.org...

Austerity was/is nothing more than the pursuit of a political ideology mis-sold as a financial necessity.
It deliberately targets the most needy and vulnerable in our society.

I have absolutely no doubt that The Labour Pary have been guilty of such practices in the past and wouldn't think twice about doing so in the future, especially considering the unscrupulous and insidious nature of Jeremy Corbyn.

But we digress.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: ipsedixit



If parliament authorizes another referendum there will be another referendum.


That may well be true.

But parliament and more or less all who infest it have absolutely zero credibility in the eyes of a very high percentage of the public.
A second referendum carries no legal or moral weight whatsoever.

If the result of the referendum can be so casually dismissed how can any other referendum have any sort of legitimacy?



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: ipsedixit

They should let the weans vote if there is another referendum this time around.
After all it's there future about to be quite possibly flushed down the toilet.
Not ours.


Lol!!!
The majority of those who rule and make the laws are *pensioners*



*There are more over 70s in parliament than ever

before. The number of pensioners on the green benches is now higher than

at any other time since records began,Parliament has more pension-age

politicians than ever before, a new study has found.*



AND Those who you want to decide which pensioners to vote in at 16 years old

A new report out today states.......



*You may think you're grown up at 18, but our brains don't fully mature

until after we hit 30. Experts say it's difficult to pinpoint exactly when the

brain stops maturing.Evidence suggests that the brain changes significantly

until at least 30 This raises questions over when people should legally be

considered 'mature' While they may be old enough to drive, vote, marry and

join the army people younger than 30 are still not fully mature, say experts.

On the basis of research the answer to the question when the average brain

reaches a ‘threshold of maturity’‘From what I’ve reviewed, the answer might

lie somewhere between “the 30s” and “never”.


Your future in their hands!!!!









edit on 19-3-2019 by eletheia because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: eletheia

Naw i meant the actual weans.

Probably make more sense. LoL

I'm aware of the demographics responsible for Brexit.

Its been swings and roundabouts since the beginning, a complete and utter cluster four letter word and then some.

Either way and whatever the outcome, i don't expect things to get better with the track record this shower of bastards have.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 02:54 PM
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Can we just get to hanging the buggers seeing they have all cocked it up?.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: Freeborn

The first referendum wasn't binding. It was an advisory referendum. It was won in ways that are suspicious. i think a close result in a second referendum would be a problem. If Brexit really is the will of the people, it should increase its majority in a second referendum. That would settle the issue, I think. A significant number of people think another referendum is necessary.



posted on Mar, 19 2019 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: ipsedixit



The first referendum wasn't binding. It was an advisory referendum.


Perhaps not legally - I'm sure there's some that might argue it was but I'm certainly no legal or constitution expert - but it definitely was morally binding.
Ignoring the result is an affront to the democratic process, pretty simply really.



It was won in ways that are suspicious.


Really?
In what way?
There certainly were a lot of lies, mis-representations and outright bull# spouted, by both sides.

Remainers persist with the lie that Brexit supporters didn't know what they voted for.
I did, I knew full well what I was voting for and what to expect.
And so did at least 99% of other people I know who voted to leave the EU.

I do know that there's more than a few Remainers who are pissed off with the attempts to derail the democratic vote and just want us to get the hell out of the EU as soon as possible and get on with moving this country forward.
All this delaying is doing the country more harm than any other scenario.



i think a close result in a second referendum would be a problem.


I think any result of a second referendum would be a problem....how can any result be considered valid when the result of the first referendum has been so casually dismissed by those who didn't get the vote they wanted.
The very principle of democratic referendums will be under-mined and devalued forever.



A significant number of people think another referendum is necessary.


And an even greater number of people don't think another referendum is possible.




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