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The Earth's Magnetosphere Produces Radio Frequency Noise

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posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:01 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: rickymouse




Just be aware that we should shelter ourselves for part of the day from these frequencies so we can heal and repair right, constantly staying in an unnatural bubble is probably not good.


I have my tinfoil on. Did you pick up some more. I know you were getting low on it from what you said in another thread.


no, tinfoil was not on sale when we went to the store. We are on our last roll.
edit on 29-12-2018 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: Phage

That looks to have a repeating pattern



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Bouncy bouncy.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl
I just want to say that this a a horribly written article.

"...picked up by an antenna that lies beneath the earth's geomagnetic lines." Could that statement be any more vague? I know next to nothing about antennas and magnetic "field lines" and this sentence sounds EXACTLY like the type of thing I would write if I didn't do any real research on a topic but wanted to SOUND as if I know what I'm talking about.

"The earth's magnetosphere is the region of space surrounding the planet." Seriously?! The "region of space?" How far?

I feel DUMBER after having read this.

The sounds are cool though, so thank you for posting. Not your fault that the article author sucks.


Sorry, I think it was written for geomagnetic scientists, maybe. Anyway, yes the antenna would be just under the earth's magnetic lines as they enter and exit the magnetic pole located at the South Magnetic Pole, not to be confused with the actual geographic South Pole. Here is a Wiki article to thoroughly confuse you (JK). It is very comparable to to the lines created by a bar magnet in iron filings.

The Earth's Geomagnetic Poles



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 08:51 PM
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a reply to: NightFlight




Sorry, I think it was written for geomagnetic scientists, maybe.
Quite the opposite, actually.
There is no such thing as "magnetic lines." That's the point.


edit on 12/29/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:03 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: NightFlight




Sorry, I think it was written for geomagnetic scientists, maybe.
Quite the opposite, actually.
There is no such thing as "magnetic lines." That's the point.


So my compass works by magic? I knew it. Don't tell Tesla, his motors will quit working. You have to have magnetic lines to create a magnetic field.
edit on 29-12-2018 by NightFlight because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-12-2018 by NightFlight because: Just having fun...



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:05 PM
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a reply to: NightFlight




So my compass works by magic?
No, it works because Earth has a magnetic field. No lines, a field.



Don't tell Tesla, his motors will quit working,
Good thing he understood electricity and magnetism a bit better than he understood electromagnetic radiation.



You have to have magnetic lines to create a magnetic field.
No. While field strength can be depicted with "contour" lines, such lines don't actually exist. A topographic map has contour lines depicting elevation, but those lines are not real.

edit on 12/29/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:32 PM
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This Gizmodo article provides some more accurate information about these "space sounds."

It's interesting that these sounds are directly converted from their RF counterparts. The VLF receivers record RF signals in the range of 100 Hz to 10 kHz. Then those RF signals are converted directly into audio signals of the same frequency and amplitude.

British Antarctic Survey: Sounds of Space Project


-dex



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

Reminds me, I really need to check out Elite Dangerous. I got very involved with the original game.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

Thanks Dex there is a bit more info there. Not sure this is correct though. Humans can't hear radio waves as Phage has already pointed out.


But the radio waves collected at Halley also happen to fall within the frequency range of human hearing



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

See below.

(sorry Dexter, couldn't wait any longer)
edit on 12/29/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 10:02 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: DexterRiley

Thanks Dex there is a bit more info there. Not sure this is correct though. Humans can't hear radio waves as Phage has already pointed out.


But the radio waves collected at Halley also happen to fall within the frequency range of human hearing




That's true. We can't hear the RF signals directly. The VLF receivers detect the electromagnetic signals, then convert that frequency and amplitude information into an audio signal that can be played through a speaker. So there's a direct correlation.

In some other cases, the EM information has to be up-converted or down-converted to the audio frequency range in order for humans to appreciate the unique tones. One example of this that comes to mind is when ESA's Rosetta satellite was approaching Comet 67P/C-G.

The comet seems to be emitting a ‘song’ in the form of oscillations in the magnetic field in the comet’s environment. It is being sung at 40-50 millihertz, far below human hearing, which typically picks up sound between 20 Hz and 20 kHz. To make the music audible to the human ear, the frequencies have been increased by a factor of about 10,000.


However, in the case of the Halley Research Station recordings, the frequencies were already within the human hearing range and didn't require any scaling.


-dex



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 10:14 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

Ok, that makes sense. Thanks for the explanation.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: DexterRiley

Reminds me, I really need to check out Elite Dangerous. I got very involved with the original game.



I was thinking about getting into Elite Dangerous myself. Looks like it's a beautiful and captivating time-sink.


However, I learned my lesson years ago playing Doom in the early 1990's. Playing for hours on end, without sleep. Burning up sick-leave and vacation time. Royally pissing off the wife...

Even now I've been known to spend the better part of a day converting all of the matter in the universe into paperclips.


With Elite Dangerous infinite game play, I would probably end up dying of a stroke huddled in a cluttered corner of my man cave, surrounded by empty peanut butter jars and discarded Hot Pocket sleeves.

Then again... maybe it's worth another look... there are worse ways to go...



-dex



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 01:48 AM
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a reply to: Phage




No. While field strength can be depicted with "contour" lines, such lines don't actually exist. A topographic map has contour lines depicting elevation, but those lines are not real.



Sort of the same as an electron is not spinning around the nucleus. More like charged fields interacting with other fields.




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