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Would you accept a no-raise promotion?

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posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: strongfp

realistically what's going to happen is your going to move to another company for better pay at some point and they will have to retrain someone else




posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:23 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: schuyler

if that's true then wouldn't that drive wage/ incentive growth for those with the skills?


Sure, for "those with the skills." Last time I checked the starting salary for a chemical engineer was way over $100K per year. I'd say that has already happened. But those unemployed will remain so because the fact that a chemical engineer's salary has gone up die to scarcity has nothing in t for them.


yeah but there can't be 7 billion chemical engineers and our society remain functional



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy

originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: strongfp

so I hire you, give you a promotion without a raise, you acquire the skills and leave my company

how does that benefit me long term?
Why did they leave your company?
I've taken more responsibility for no extra pay in my life before now, it was a tactical move, and I ended up earning more with the same company.


so you took a position and got a raise



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

I've been self employed a decade+ now so I'm only going on memory and opinion lol



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: strongfp

realistically what's going to happen is your going to move to another company for better pay at some point and they will have to retrain someone else


I'm lucky and sort of unlucky that my career is rather a revolving door, I work in structural steel, and lay offs are often. But job offers are also often as well.

I get calls or emails or messages on Linkedin at least three times a week. Even repeat company's after only a month or so of declining or ignoring them.

But, I work for a great company right now, rarely lays off, very employee oriented and loves to involve everyone. I make also a little less than the industry usually calls for. But hey, when you treat your employees right they will stay.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Believe it or not, not everyone works solely for pay.

I've taken a promotion out of one position to move into another one without raise. I was getting more advantageous hours and the chance to add a wider array of experience to my resume along with the chance to say I had proofed and edited promotional materials for a national chain store over simply being one random floor proofer.

My husband has also taken promotions out of one area and into another for the benefit of broadening his experience and the chance to work on different projects that no one else wanted to tackle that he felt he could handle. Those were risks, yes, but since he made them work, in these days, they have paid off richly and continue to do so.

Other people I know of have taken promotions without pay raises to get out of poor situations and into better ones.

There are plenty of reasons that money falls off your list of priorities when it comes to considering a job offer.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:32 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

First off, I think your analysis is probably quite close to the truth. ". People will literally do anything to get ahead including taking promotions with no corresponding increase income. "

This applies particularly to the Milinials.

However, I think there's another correlation your missing.
64% of employees said they would, according to a survey by staffing firm OfficeTeam.

I think that pretty much corresponds to the idea that about 60% of the population is considerably.......dimmer, than the 40% that's pretty intelligent.

That said, whether its wise to take a promotion without a raise sort of depends on the circumstances. If your told your taking it or else, you'd probably better take it and then start immediatley looking for a new job because you're probably being set up to take the fall for the previous holder of the job.

If you're "offered" the promotion but with no more money and can decline; my bet would be on declining and then looking for a new job.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

So you had incentives???



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: strongfp

realistically what's going to happen is your going to move to another company for better pay at some point and they will have to retrain someone else


I don't know about the person you're talking about, but the company my husband works for has an excellent environment and good benefits with great time off. So even if a job he moves to doesn't come with a pay raise, the steady increasing benefits that will follow him inside the company are often enough to make him think more than twice about seeking a job outside.

For my part, the scheduling is what keeps me around. It just plain fits with my requirements as the mother of a school age child. So even if I don't get a raise all the time, the reality is that my income is a supplement anyhow, and the schedule frees me up to go and be where I need to be when I need to be there.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

That's actually closer to my position although I totally get what others are saying.

With incentives or if it leads to more career growth down the line yea will of course but the only reason this even exist now is due to the fact that there are so many dumbas*** out there that would do it for no more pay for what's essentially bragging rights.

Discounting other incentives such as what Ketsuko or other members list.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

Your OP just said a no-raise promotion. It said nothing about no incentives.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:38 PM
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Become self employed. Problem solved.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

A job title is an incentive. It generally implies that you are getting and taking on more responsibility, so it will reflect on your resume.

When I mentioned my husband, he was moving sideways a lot and taking on projects solely for his own personal growth and to polish his resume.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: strongfp

realistically what's going to happen is your going to move to another company for better pay at some point and they will have to retrain someone else


Realistically, that may very well happen if the employer chooses to not offer any incentives at a future date to retain that employee. the employer most likely has decided the risk is much more financially viable for their business model at the time of offering such a promotion.

For the employee, the promotion can be an incentive to stay and continue. Benefits of new skills and experience added to their resume or simply acquired to request a salary raise effectively in the future with that same employer after they have proven their worth.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:48 PM
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Would you accept a no-raise promotion?



As owner and CEO of a couple LLCs, I give myself a raise when ever I want; the perks of having the accounts in your name.

With my side gigs, it's union scale, which ain't to shabby!!




edit on 9-6-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

my niece just this last month...no diploma, dropout..hired to deliver pizzas at minimum wage...week later...go inside instead...make pizzas, no breaks..same delivery pay.

don't like it dropout? Get out...tried to tell her about dropping out...

I think I may have once or twice taken a promotion...but within the same-grouped union scale pay grade
edit on 9-6-2018 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults

originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: toysforadults
a reply to: schuyler

if that's true then wouldn't that drive wage/ incentive growth for those with the skills?


Sure, for "those with the skills." Last time I checked the starting salary for a chemical engineer was way over $100K per year. I'd say that has already happened. But those unemployed will remain so because the fact that a chemical engineer's salary has gone up die to scarcity has nothing in t for them.


yeah but there can't be 7 billion chemical engineers and our society remain functional


7 billion?? Not the point, of course. You really should understand that my use of "chemical engineer" was an EXAMPLE of the problem. I'm actually quite surprised that you don't seem to get that. Let me try this one more time. The idea here is that for the first time job openings exceed the (so-called) number of unemployed and therefore this should drive up wages. My contention here is that there is a massive DISPARITY between the jobs that are open and the skill sets of the unemployed. The unemployed, by and large, DO NOT QUALIFY for the positions that are open. That there exist more openings than people to fill them is an interesting statistic, but an irrelevant one in the real world of job seeking.

We really have two pools of workers here. One consists of the well-educated qualified for positions of which there are more than the labor pool to fill them. These tend to be in technical and scientific areas where there is a great need and many unfilled positions. The second pool of workers consist of the uneducated (or wrongly-educated in the case of a B.A. in English) where the number of job openings for which THEY qualify is less than the number of unemployed. This pool of jobs is shrinking due to the encroachment of automation. These people wind up "under-employed" (hence the English major flinging fries) or not employed at all.

Now the "obvious" solution is to "re-train" all the unemployed and under-employed in fields that do have a demand. The most common area here is in "IT" with many private schools purporting to "retrain" people so they can be "IT Professionals." Unfortunately this usually results in a surplus of beginning IT people who lack experience and often do not have an affinity for the jobs that are available. Meanwhile these fly-by-night schools make off with the tuition. The Bottom Line here is that you simply CANNOT train an English Major into a Chemical Engineer. They don't have the brains to cut it. They can't hack the math. So they will remain disappointed and resentful while they work at McDonalds.



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 03:01 PM
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To quote Kevin Spacey in my favorite movie of all time (American Beauty).

“I want the job with the least responsibility possible.”




posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 03:03 PM
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If you really want to succeed get a good education at Trump University. Just can't beat that degree and credentials for the mobile upward entrepreneur or businessman.

www.businessinsider.com...
edit on 9-6-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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What, thinking they will do less ? They will certainly be required to do more and be responsible for others. It works out to a loss in wages in reality.







 
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