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The First woman....

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posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 03:49 PM
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saw an article celebrating the first woman thunderbird pilot, and all the people that responded seemed to be either hating a strong woman or wanting to worship at her feet.

So I made a mistake and tossed my 2 cents into the mix, I pointed out that every time we hold up someone and say the first woman/black person/trans whatever we are focusing on the wrong thing.

by putting the race or gender or whatever front and center on the headline we are celebrating everything except what they are excelling at. So why not instead focus on what they actually did, you know judge them by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin/gender etc.

so of course people lost their minds attacking what I said, and either calling me a [snipped], or saying I hate women for not wanting to hold up the fact she is a woman, or because I didn't say she should be barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen.

I don't get it how did such a simple concept get lost, when ever I am wearing the uniform the only thing I care about is can the person I am working with do the job.

There is literally nothing else I care about, how did I become the dinosaur when it comes to dealing with people... once again I find myself hating people and preferring the company of dogs and cats.
edit on Tue Mar 27 2018 by DontTreadOnMe because: profanity T&C




posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

We live in the age of identity politics.


Weaponize yours or step aside.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:12 PM
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Any time I hear something being celebrated as "The first woman to..." I disregard it. It's not important to me. In fact, to me as a woman, it completely diminishes their contribution down to a cooter and boobs. Some "First", eh?

Not worth hailing as anything monumental. The body is just a body, the skin is just skin, the origin point is just an origin point. I don't give a rat's ass about who was first to do what and why their genitals supposedly matter, I give a rat's ass about how important their contributions were to their field. If the only thing that matters is that some woman did something as a First, that's a pretty low bar to me. Like, so low you're walking on it. That kind of groveling trivialization should be as beneath us as the low bar is.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

To me, it’s important when you consider the history of women. It wasn’t really all that long ago when women weren’t allowed to go to college or vote or run a business or participate in any industry dominated by men (and most industries were dominated by men).

Every time a barrier is broken, I think it’s great to note it. After that, it doesn’t matter anymore. When the first women became CEO’s of large corporations, it was a big deal - now it’s not anymore, so no one says “ 34th woman to become CEO”.

When we get our first woman president, I will think it’s a pretty big deal after 200+ years of only male presidents. But after that first woman, it won’t be a big deal anymore and not worth noting for the subsequent women presidents.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf


You are literally Hitler.





posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

So?

When I was doing the things I did, I was doing it because I wanted to do it and do it well. I didn't care about being a woman. I cared about earning it to show I could. I as in me, not I as in woman. You don't get to ride my coattails. You want to do it; go do it yourself.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:39 PM
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So I was active duty Air Force for 28 years and retired as a Senior Master Sergeant (and am male). Years of service were 1976-2004. I spent time in units across the spectrum, including an operational flying unit. Those years I was in, it was quite difficult for women to succeed in traditionally male roles. Some of it was mistreatment by male counterparts, some of it was unrealistic expectations (on both sides), and some of it was because women and men are different biologically. Those that succeed at “firsts” should be celebrated as they are usually the ones that had to prove the barriers didn’t apply. That includes first woman Thunderbird pilot, first person of color to hold various positions of authority, or even the first male nurse. These people become role models for others and the proof that you can do anything regardless of your starting point.

It’s really nothing to lose your mind over. You say to them congratulations, well done, now get back to work. Just like I’m sure people told you as you were promoted or received awards.

Now those that think women are just to be in a kitchen barefoot and pregnant...I have had the pleasure of working with and for many women that would put those people to shame in any endeavor!
edit on 27-3-2018 by Lab4Us because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-3-2018 by Lab4Us because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: kaylaluv

So?

When I was doing the things I did, I was doing it because I wanted to do it and do it well. I didn't care about being a woman. I cared about earning it to show I could. I as in me, not I as in woman. You don't get to ride my coattails. You want to do it; go do it yourself.


And you also set examples for those young girls that came after you that heard their whole life that “girls can’t do that”. A role model whether you wanted that or not...



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Who’s talking about riding anyone’s coattails?

Let’s substitute kid for woman. The first kid under the age of 12 who gets a Nobel prize is going to be noted as such. Does it matter? Well, sure, it’s worthy to note such an accomplishment. The next time a kid under the age of 12 gets a Nobel prize, it doesn’t mean they didn’t do the work to get it - but they won’t be the first, so it won’t be as big a deal, and so on with the 3rd, 4th or 54th time a kid gets a Nobel prize. All of them still have to do the work to get it.
edit on 27-3-2018 by kaylaluv because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf



once again I find myself hating people


Sorry dude, I'm not quite getting my head around that whole "once again" malarkey.

People who are prepared to put their gender, sexuality or whatever it is that identifies their location on the human spectrum on a pedestal for every one to kneel before, is an a$$hole.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: Lab4Us

And that's fine, but what I don't like is the breaking glass ceiling talk.

It shouldn't matter. The "first" has to use motivators that already exist, and obviously they work just fine.

It's about your personal motivation, and if you let a little thing like whether or not someone who looks enough like you did it before you stop you, then how motivated were you really? You are doing it in the first place because it's something you really want, and when it gets hard, gets "un-fun" you find reasons to keep going and if you really want it, then you'll find those reasons. Not having a pin-up role model is the last thing that should kill your motivation and ability to believe in yourself.
edit on 27-3-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: Lab4Us

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: kaylaluv

So?

When I was doing the things I did, I was doing it because I wanted to do it and do it well. I didn't care about being a woman. I cared about earning it to show I could. I as in me, not I as in woman. You don't get to ride my coattails. You want to do it; go do it yourself.


And you also set examples for those young girls that came after you that heard their whole life that “girls can’t do that”. A role model whether you wanted that or not...


My older sister rocks. President of her own company. Great at math. Had a black belt at 14. Hockey player in college.

If your sister is like mine, you don't expect anything except excellence from women. Oh, and she was born in 1960, so she broke a few glass ceilings.


You go gals!



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Miss?

If you're going to break any glass ceiling, break out the vacuum cleaner afterwards.


Then sandwiches.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:58 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: ketsuko

Miss?

If you're going to break any glass ceiling, break out the vacuum cleaner afterwards.


Then sandwiches.



No soup for you!



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
a reply to: Irishhaf

We live in the age of identity politics.


Weaponize yours or step aside.


This is one of the best things I've ever seen someone post.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

How bout I do the laundry instead?



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: kaylaluv
a reply to: Nyiah

To me, it’s important when you consider the history of women. It wasn’t really all that long ago when women weren’t allowed to go to college or vote or run a business or participate in any industry dominated by men (and most industries were dominated by men).

Every time a barrier is broken, I think it’s great to note it. After that, it doesn’t matter anymore. When the first women became CEO’s of large corporations, it was a big deal - now it’s not anymore, so no one says “ 34th woman to become CEO”.

When we get our first woman president, I will think it’s a pretty big deal after 200+ years of only male presidents. But after that first woman, it won’t be a big deal anymore and not worth noting for the subsequent women presidents.

It's really not a big deal, though. Does having breasts and a vagina make the contributions superior?

Just like a penis and testicles not making a contribution better or more important historically, they also do not.

Celebrate & acknowledge the individual monumental accomplishments such as what Marie Curie brought chemistry, not that she was a woman doing it. Her genitals didn't make a lick of difference in those monumental discoveries.
Focusing on her being the first to win the Nobel makes her work less pivotal to chemistry and physics than it was. It just makes it a mundane crotch competition.



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
You are literally Hitler.


How's that possible when we're literally Hitler?




edit on 27-3-2018 by AugustusMasonicus because: Armaments 2:9-21 And the people did feast upon the lambs, and sloths, and carp, and anchovies, and orangutans, and breakfast cereals, and fruit bats...



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 05:25 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: DBCowboy
You are literally Hitler.


How's that possible when we're literally Hitler?





All will be explained in Our Manifesto, "Breaking Wind".



posted on Mar, 27 2018 @ 05:51 PM
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originally posted by: Nyiah

originally posted by: kaylaluv
a reply to: Nyiah

To me, it’s important when you consider the history of women. It wasn’t really all that long ago when women weren’t allowed to go to college or vote or run a business or participate in any industry dominated by men (and most industries were dominated by men).

Every time a barrier is broken, I think it’s great to note it. After that, it doesn’t matter anymore. When the first women became CEO’s of large corporations, it was a big deal - now it’s not anymore, so no one says “ 34th woman to become CEO”.

When we get our first woman president, I will think it’s a pretty big deal after 200+ years of only male presidents. But after that first woman, it won’t be a big deal anymore and not worth noting for the subsequent women presidents.



Celebrate & acknowledge the individual monumental accomplishments such as what Marie Curie brought chemistry, not that she was a woman doing it.


I guess I can’t understand why we can’t do both. Celebrate her individual accomplishments and acknowledge that she was the first woman to do it. I guess I come from a history buff’s perspective. I like to know if someone was the first black person to do something, or the first American to do something, or the first woman to do something, or the first disabled person to do something...




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